Hoops Legends: Top 100 Men's College Basketball Players of All-Time

Doug BrodessCorrespondent IJanuary 4, 2011

Hoops Legends: Top 100 Men's College Basketball Players of All-Time

0 of 100

    http://newsroom.ucla.edu

    College basketball has a long and storied history.

    Collegehoopsnet.com gives the following account of the beginning of the college game:

    "The first recorded game involving a college basketball team took place in Beaver Falls, Pennsylvania on April 8, 1893 when a team from Geneva College defeated the New Brighton YMCA.

    "The first intercollegiate game was played on February 9, 1895 when Minnesota State School of Agriculture defeated Hamline College by a score of 9 to 3.

    "The first intercollegiate game involving the now familiar five-player format occurred in Iowa City, Iowa on January 18, 1896 when the University of Chicago defeated the University of Iowa 15 to 12. Before that time, there were usually seven to nine players on each team."

    Over the years, the style of the college game has changed considerably, going from a deliberate, low-scoring battle to a fast-paced, wide-open contest involving some of the best athletes in the world.

    While current players continue to take the game to new heights, there have been exceptional players bringing their best for many decades.

    The following list (with representatives from eight decades) ranks the 100 best college basketball players of all-time. One of the only requirements to make the list is that an individual had to have been selected as a first team All-American during at least one of his seasons.

    The unfortunate truth is that many outstanding players are left off this list...that is unavoidable.

    As a fan and a reader, you might view the omission of a certain player as an injustice. I invite your input and feedback. Don't just tell me that I made a mistake. Tell me why and where "your player" deserves to be inserted into this list.

    The first several players have their basic statistics and awards listed. As you continue through this catalog of the class of collegiate hoops, I have supplied more details for you.

    Enjoy!

100. Travis Grant, Kentucky State

1 of 100

    http://www.allkyhoops.com

    Travis Grant (Machine Gun, The Machine)

    Position: Forward
    Height: 6'7" ▪ Weight: 215 lbs.
    College: Kentucky State

    Career Scoring Average: 33.4 ppg

    Grant is college basketball's all-division leading scorer. In 131 games, he scored 4,045 points.

    ESPN.com wrote a great article on Grant and his amazing college career.

99. Stephen Curry, Davidson

2 of 100

    http://www.theepochtimes.comStreeter Lecka/Getty Images

    Wardell Stephen Curry II

    Position: Guard
    Height: 6'3" ▪ Weight: 185 lbs.
    College: Davidson

    Career Scoring Average: 25.3 ppg

    Rebounding Average: 4.5 rpg

    Assists Average: 3.7 apg

    2007-08 NCAA AP All-America (2nd)
    2008-09 NCAA AP All-America (1st)

98. Mateen Cleaves, Michigan State

3 of 100

    http://i.cdn.turner.com

    Mateen Cleaves

    Position: Guard
    Height: 6'2" ▪ Weight: 205 lbs.
    College: Michigan State

    College Career Scoring Average: 12.5 ppg

    Assists: 6.6 apg

    1997-98 NCAA AP All-America (2nd)
    1998-99 NCAA AP All-America (1st)
    1999-00 NCAA AP All-America (2nd)

    1999-00 NCAA Final Four Most Outstanding Player

97. Keith Lee, Memphis

4 of 100

    http://media.commercialappeal.com

    Keith DeWayne Lee

    Position: Forward-Center
    Height: 6'10" ▪ Weight: 215 lbs.
    College: Memphis

    College Career Scoring Average: 18.8 ppg

    Rebounds: 10.4 rpg

    1981-82 NCAA AP All-America (2nd)
    1982-83 NCAA AP All-America (1st)
    1983-84 NCAA AP All-America (3rd)
    1984-85 NCAA AP All-America (1st)

96. Spencer Haywood, Detroit

5 of 100

    Spencer Haywood

    Position: Forward-Center
    Height: 6'8" ▪ Weight: 225 lbs.
    College: University of Detroit Mercy 1968-69

    Career Scoring Average: 32.1 ppg

    Rebounding Average: 22.1 rpg

    1968-69 NCAA AP All-America (1st)

95. Rod Hundley, West Virginia

6 of 100

    (WVU Sports Communications)

    Rodney Clark Hundley (Rod, Hot Rod)

    Position: Guard
    Height: 6'4" ▪ Weight: 185 lbs.
    College: West Virginia 1954-1957

    Career Scoring Average: 24.5 ppg

    Rebounds: 10.6 rpg

    1955-56 NCAA AP All-America (2nd)
    1956-57 NCAA AP All-America (1st)

94. Ray Allen, Connecticut

7 of 100

    Jamie Squire/Getty Images

    Walter Ray Allen (Ray)

    Position: Guard
    Height: 6'5" ▪ Weight: 205 lbs.
    College: Connecticut

    Career Scoring Average: 19.0 ppg

    Rebounding Average: 6.0 rpg

    Assists Average: 2.4 apg

    1994-95 NCAA AP All-America (3rd)
    1995-96 NCAA AP All-America (1st)

93. Cliff Hagan, Kentucky

8 of 100

    http://www.bigbluehistory.net

    Clifford Oldham Hagan (Cliff, Li'l Abner)

    Position: Forward-Guard
    Height: 6'4" ▪ Weight: 210 lbs.
    College: Kentucky

    Career Scoring Average: 19.2 ppg

    Rebounding Average: 13.5 rpg

    1951-52 NCAA AP All-America (1st)
    1953-54 NCAA AP All-America (1st)

92. Richard Hamilton, UConn

9 of 100

    Ezra Shaw/Getty Images

    Richard Clay Hamilton (Rip)

    Position: Guard-Forward
    Height: 6'6" ▪ Weight: 185 lbs.
    College: Connecticut

    Career Scoring Average: 19.8 ppg

    Rebounding Average: 4.5 rpg

    Assists Average: 2.6 apg

    1997-98 NCAA AP All-America (2nd)
    1998-99 NCAA AP All-America (1st)

    1998-99 NCAA Final Four Most Outstanding Player

91. Terry Cummings, DePaul

10 of 100

    http://i.cdn.turner.com

    Robert Terrell Cummings (Terry, T.C.)

    Position: Forward
    Height: 6'9" ▪ Weight: 220 lbs.
    College: DePaul

    College Career Scoring Average: 16.4 ppg

    Rebounds: 10.1 rpg

    1981-82 NCAA AP All-America (1st)

90. Otis Birdsong, Houston

11 of 100

    www.chron.com

    Otis Lee Birdsong (Bird)

    Position: Guard
    Height: 6'3" ▪ Weight: 190 lbs.
    College: Houston

    Career Scoring Average: 24.4 ppg

    Rebounding Average:4.9 rpg

    1976-77 NCAA AP All-America

    One of the greatest pure shooters ever to play, the 6'3" Birdsong was a consensus All-American in 1977 and ranks second on the Cougars’ career scoring charts (2,832 points, 24.4 per game).

    As a senior, Birdsong became the only player in Southwest Conference history to average 30 points per game (30.1), the year he was named SWC Player of the Year.

89. Sidney Wicks, UCLA

12 of 100

    Sidney Wicks

    Position: Forward-Center
    Height: 6'8" ▪ Weight: 225 lbs.
    College: UCLA

    Career Scoring Average: 15.8 ppg

    Rebounding Average: 9.9 rpg

    1969-70 NCAA AP All-America (3rd)
    1970-71 NCAA AP All-America (1st)

    1969-70 NCAA Final Four Most Outstanding Player

88. Kenyon Martin, Cincinnati

13 of 100

    Jonathan Daniel/Getty Images

    Kenyon Lee Martin (K-Mart)

    Position: Forward
    Height: 6'9" ▪ Weight: 234 lbs.
    College: Cincinnati

    Career Scoring Average: 11.0 ppg

    Rebounding Average: 7.5 rpg

    1999-00 NCAA AP All-America (1st)

    1999-00 NCAA AP Player of the Year
    1999-00 NCAA John R. Wooden Award
    1999-00 NCAA Naismith Men's College Player of the Year Award

87. Marcus Camby, Massachusetts

14 of 100

    Al Bello/Getty Images

    Marcus D. Camby

    Position: Center-Forward
    Height: 6'11" ▪ Weight: 220 lbs.
    College: Massachusetts

    Career Scoring Average: 15.1 ppg

    Rebounding Average: 7.0 rpg

    Blocks: 336

    1995-96 NCAA AP All-America (1st)

    1995-96 NCAA AP Player of the Year
    1995-96 NCAA John R. Wooden Award
    1995-96 NCAA Naismith Men's College Player of the Year Award

86. Chet Walker, Bradley

15 of 100

    Chet Walker

    Position: Forward-Guard
    Height: 6'6" ▪ Weight: 212 lbs.
    College: Bradley

    Career Scoring average: 24.4 ppg

    Career Rebounding average: 12.8 rpg

    1959-60 NCAA AP All-America (2nd)
    1960-61 NCAA AP All-America (1st)
    1961-62 NCAA AP All-America (1st)

85. Jason Kidd, California

16 of 100

    Getty Images/Getty Images

    Jason Frederick Kidd

    Position: Guard
    Height: 6'4" ▪ Weight: 205 lbs.
    College: Cal

    Career Scoring Average: 14.9 ppg

    Rebounding Average: 5.9 rpg

    Assists Average: 8.4 apg

    1993-94 NCAA AP All-America (1st)

    

84. Jameer Nelson, St. Joseph's

17 of 100

    Rick Stewart/Getty Images

    Position: Guard
    Height: 6'0" ▪ Weight: 190 lbs.
    College: Saint Joseph's University

    Career Scoring Average: 16.8 ppg

    Rebounding Average: 4.6 rpg

    Assists Average: 5.7 apg

    2003-04 NCAA AP All-America (1st)

    2003-04 NCAA AP Player of the Year
    2003-04 NCAA John R. Wooden Award
    2003-04 NCAA Naismith Men's College Player of the Year Award

83. Frank Selvy, Furman

18 of 100

    Franklin Delano Selvy (Frank)

    Position: Guard-Forward
    Height: 6'3" ▪ Weight: 180 lbs.
    College: Furman

    1952-53 NCAA AP All-America (2nd)
    1953-54 NCAA AP All-America (1st)

82. Emeka Okafor, Connecticut

19 of 100

    Doug Pensinger/Getty Images

    Chukwuemeka Noubuisi Okafor

    Position: Center-Forward
    Height: 6'10" ▪ Weight: 252 lbs.
    College: University of Connecticut

    Career Scoring Average: 13.8 ppg

    Rebounding Average: 10.6 rpg

    2003-04 NCAA AP All-America (1st)

    2003-04 NCAA Final Four Most Outstanding Player

81. Raef LaFrentz, Kansas

20 of 100

    Jonathan Daniel/Getty Images

    Raef Andrew LaFrentz

    Position: Forward-Center
    Height: 6'11" ▪ Weight: 240 lbs.
    College: Kansas

    Career Scoring Average: 15.8 ppg

    Rebounding: 9.1 rpg

    1996-97 NCAA AP All-America (1st)
    1997-98 NCAA AP All-America (1st)

80. Elton Brand, Duke

21 of 100

    Craig Jones/Getty Images

    Elton Tyron Brand

    Position: Forward
    Height: 6'8" ▪ Weight: 275 lbs.
    College: Duke

    Career Scoring Average: 16.2 ppg

    Rebounding: 8.9 rpg

    1998-99 NCAA AP Player of the Year
    1998-99 NCAA John R. Wooden Award

79. Jason Williams, Duke

22 of 100

    Jason Williams (Jay)

    Position: Guard
    Height: 6'2" ▪ Weight: 195 lbs. 
    College: Duke

    Career Scoring Average: 19.3 ppg

    Assists: 6.0 apg

    2000-01 NCAA AP All-America (1st)
    2001-02 NCAA AP All-America (1st)

    2001-02 NCAA AP Player of the Year
    2001-02 NCAA John R. Wooden Award
    2001-02 NCAA Naismith Men's College Player of the Year Award

    Williams became one of the few freshmen in Duke's history to average double figures in scoring (14.5 ppg) and was named ACC Rookie of the Year and National Freshman of the Year by The Sporting News.

    As a sophomore, Williams led the Blue Devils to the 2001 NCAA National Championship, earning NABC Player of the Year honors.

78. Glenn Robinson, Purdue

23 of 100

    http://dimemag.com

    Glenn A. Robinson (Big Dog)

    Position: Forward
    Height: 6'7" ▪ Weight: 225 lbs.
    College: Purdue

    Career Scoring Average: 27.5 ppg

    Rebounds: 9.7 rpg

    1992-93 NCAA AP All-America (2nd)
    1993-94 NCAA AP All-America (1st)

    1993-94 NCAA AP Player of the Year
    1993-94 NCAA John R. Wooden Award
    1993-94 NCAA Naismith Men's College Player of the Year Award

    Robinson left Purdue after becoming the only Boilermaker to have more than 1,000 points, 500 rebounds, 100 steals, 100 assists and 50 blocked shots in a career during his two seasons at Purdue.

77. Dan Issel, Kentucky

24 of 100

    http://www.ukathletics.com

    Daniel Paul Issel (Dan, Horse)

    Position: Center-Forward
    Height: 6'9" ▪ Weight: 235 lbs.
    College: Kentucky

    Career Scoring Average: 25.8 ppg

    Rebounds: 13.0

    1968-69 NCAA AP All-America (2nd)
    1969-70 NCAA AP All-America (1st)

    During his senior, Issel averaged an incredible 33.9 points and 13.2 rebounds per game.

76. Artis Gilmore, Jacksonville University

25 of 100

    Artis Gilmore (The A-Train)

    Position: Center
    Height: 7'2" ▪ Weight: 240 lbs.
    College: Jacksonville University

    Career Scoring Average: 23.3 ppg

    Rebounding Average: 22.7 rpg

    1969-70 NCAA AP All-America (2nd)
    1970-71 NCAA AP All-America (1st)

75. Chris Webber, Michigan

26 of 100

    Todd Rosenberg/Getty Images

    Mayce Edward Christopher Webber III (Chris)

    Position: Forward-Center
    Height: 6'9" ▪ Weight: 245 lbs.
    College: Michigan

    Career Scoring Average: 17.4 ppg

    Rebounding: 10.0

    1992-93 NCAA AP All-America (1st)

    

74. Bob McAdoo, North Carolina

27 of 100

    Robert Allen McAdoo Jr. (Bob)

    Position: Center-Forward
    Height: 6'9" ▪ Weight: 210 lbs.
    College: North Carolina

    Career Scoring Average: 19.5

    Rebounding: 10.1

    1971-72 NCAA AP All-America

73. Bernard King, Tennessee

28 of 100

    Bernard King (B)

    Position: Forward
    Height: 6'7" ▪ Weight: 205 lbs.
    College: Tennessee

    Career Scoring Average: 25.8 ppg

    Rebounding: 13.2 rpg

    1975-76 NCAA AP All-America (3rd)
    1976-77 NCAA AP All-America (1st)

72. Antawn Jamison, North Carolina

29 of 100

    Doug Pensinger/Getty Images

    Antawn Cortez Jamison

    Position: Forward
    Height: 6'8" ▪ Weight: 223 lbs.
    College: North Carolina

    Career Scoring Average: 19.9 ppg

    Rebounding: 9.9 rpg

    1996-97 NCAA AP All-America (2nd)
    1997-98 NCAA AP All-America (1st)

    1997-98 NCAA AP Player of the Year
    1997-98 NCAA John R. Wooden Award
    1997-98 NCAA Naismith Men's College Player of the Year Award

71. Allen Iverson, Georgetown

30 of 100

    Al Bello/Getty Images

    Allen Ezail Iverson (The Answer)

    Position: Guard
    Height: 6'0" ▪ Weight: 165 lbs.
    College: Georgetown

    Career Scoring Average: 23.0 ppg

    Rebounding: 3.6 rpg

    Assists: 4.6 apg

    1995-96 NCAA AP All-America (1st)

    During his sophomore year at Georgetown, Iverson had 124 steals.

70. Walt Hazzard, UCLA

31 of 100

    Walter Raphael Hazzard (Walt)

    Position: Guard
    Height: 6'2" ▪ Weight: 185
    College: UCLA

    1962-63 Consensus NCAA AP All-American
    1963-64 Consensus NCAA AP All-American

    UCLA's undefeated season, 1963-64, was in no small part due to Hazzard. The team won the NCAA Championship, and Hazzard was selected by the AP as the tournament's MVP.

    Hazzard was chosen as an All-American and also selected as College Player of the Year by the United States Basketball Writer's Association.

69. Jim Jackson, Ohio State

32 of 100

    James Arthur Jackson (Jim, Jimmy)

    Position: Guard
    Height: 6'6" ▪ Weight: 220 lbs.
    College: Ohio State

    Career Scoring Average: 19.2 ppg

    Rebounds: 5.9 rpg

    Assists: 4.0 apg

    1990-91 NCAA AP All-America (2nd)
    1991-92 NCAA AP All-America (1st)

    

68. Hersey Hawkins, Bradley

33 of 100

    Hersey R. Hawkins Jr.

    Position: Guard
    Height: 6'3" ▪ Weight: 190 lbs.
    College: Bradley

    Career Scoring Average: 24.1 ppg

    Rebounding: 6.5 rpg

    Assists: 3.2 apg

    1987-88 NCAA AP All-America (1st)

    1987-88 NCAA AP Player of the Year

    Hawkins, a prolific scorer, averaged 27.2 points per game in his junior year..

    In his senior year, Hawkins led the nation in scoring with 36.3 points per game and was named AP Player of the year.

67. Dale Ellis, Tennessee

34 of 100

    http://www.utsports.com

    Dale Ellis (Lamar Mundane)

    Position: Guard-Forward
    Height: 6'7" ▪ Weight: 205 lbs.
    College: Tennessee

    Career Scoring Average: 19.3 ppg

    Rebounding: 6.3 rpg

    1981-82 NCAA AP All-America (2nd)
    1982-83 NCAA AP All-America (1st)

    Senior year average: 34.5 ppg

    Ellis helped lead the Volunteers to three 20-win seasons and the 1982 SEC championship. That same season, Ellis earned first-team All-America honors and was the SEC Player of the Year after ranking second in the nation in field goal percentage, hitting on 65.4 percent of his shots.

    Ellis repeated as a first-team All-America performer and the SEC Player of the Year in 1982-83, as he guided Tennessee to its school-record fifth straight NCAA Tournament appearance. That season, he became just the third Vol ever to reach the 2,000-point milestone.

66. Danny Ainge, BYU

35 of 100

    Daniel Ray Ainge (Danny)

    Position: Guard-Forward
    Height: 6'4" ▪ Weight: 175 lbs.
    College: BYU

    Career Scoring Average: 20.9 ppg

    Rebounding: 4.6 rpg

    Assists: 4.6 apg

    1980-81 NCAA AP All-America (1st)

    1980-81 NCAA John R. Wooden Award; Eastman Award

    Ainge was a four-time All-WAC selection and a two-time First Team Academic All-American

    A four-year starter for the Cougars, Ainge averaged 21 points, 5.8 rebounds and 5.3 assists as a freshman.

    Ainge became a household name after hitting one of the greatest shots in NCAA March Madness history against Notre Dame in 1981. His coast-to-coast drive with only seven seconds remaining gave the Cougars a one-point win.

65. Johnny Dawkins, Duke

36 of 100

    Johnny Earl Dawkins Jr. (Pooh)

    Position: Guard
    Height: 6'2" ▪ Weight: 165 lbs.
    College: Duke (1982-86)

    Career Scoring Average:19.2 ppg

    Rebounding: 4.0 rpg

    Assists: 4.2 apg

    1984-85 NCAA AP All-America (2nd)
    1985-86 NCAA AP All-America (1st)

    1985-86 NCAA Naismith Men's College Player of the Year Award

    In his senior season, Dawkins became Duke's all-time leading scorer with 2,556 points, a mark that stood until 2006, when J.J. Redick surpassed it.

    In 2002, Dawkins was named to the ACC 50th Anniversary men's basketball team, honoring the 50 greatest players in Atlantic Coast Conference history.

64. Terry Dischinger, Purdue

37 of 100

    Terry Gilbert Dischinger

    Position: Forward-Guard
    Height: 6'7" ▪ Weight: 189 lbs.
    College: Purdue

    Career Scoring Average: 28.3

    Rebounding: 13.7

    1959-60 NCAA AP All-America (2nd)
    1960-61 NCAA AP All-America (1st)
    1961-62 NCAA AP All-America (1st)

    As a sophomore, Dischinger led the Boilermakers by averaging 26.3 points and 14.3 rebounds a game.

    During his junior season, Dischinger led the Big Ten in scoring with 28.2 points and 13.4 rebounds a game.

    In his senior season, Dischinger again led the Big Ten in scoring, averaging 30.3 points, and in rebounds, with 13.4 rebounds a game.

63. Danny Ferry, Duke

38 of 100

    Daniel John Willard Ferry (Danny)

    Position: Forward
    Height: 6'10" ▪ Weight: 230 lbs.
    College: Duke (1985-89)

    Career Scoring Average: 15.1 ppg

    Rebounding: 7.0 rpg

    Assists: 3.5 apg

    1987-88 NCAA AP All-America (2nd)
    1988-89 NCAA AP All-America (1st)

    1988-89 NCAA Naismith Men's College Player of the Year Award

    Ferry became the first player in ACC history to collect more than 2,000 points, 1,000 rebounds and 500 assists in his collegiate career.

    In 2002, Ferry was named to the ACC 50th Anniversary men's basketball team, honoring the 50 greatest players in Atlantic Coast Conference history.

62. Paul Arizin, Villanova

39 of 100

    Paul Joseph Arizin (Pitchin' Paul)

    Position: Forward-Guard
    Height: 6'4" ▪ Weight: 190 lbs.
    College: Villanova

    Career Scoring Average: 20 ppg

    1949-50 NCAA AP All-America (1st)

    In his senior season, Arizin was named the collegiate player of the year after leading the nation with 25.3 points per game.

61. Steve Alford, Indiana

40 of 100

    Stephen Todd Alford (Steve)

    Position: Guard
    Height: 6'2" ▪ Weight: 183 lbs.
    College: Indiana

    Career Scoring Average: 19.5 ppg

    Assists: 3.1 apg

    1885-86 AP All-America (1st Team)

    1986-87 AP All-America (1st Team)

    During each of his final three seasons, Alford earned first team all-Big Ten honors, including the Big Ten Player of the Year Award during the 1986-87 season.

    In his senior season, Alford led Indiana to the fifth national championship in program history

    Alford became the university's all-time leading scorer with 2,438 points—a record later eclipsed by Calbert Cheaney (who eventually went on to become the Big Ten's all-time leading scorer).

60. Keith Wilkes, UCLA

41 of 100

    Jamaal Abdul-Lateef Wilkes (Silk, Keith)

    Position: Forward-Guard
    Height: 6'6" ▪ Weight: 190 lbs. 
    College: UCLA

    Career Scoring Average: 15.0 ppg

    Rebounding: 7.4 rpg

    1972-73 NCAA AP All-America (2nd)
    1973-74 NCAA AP All-America (1st)

    Wilkes teamed with Bill Walton to bring UCLA the 1972 and 1973 NCAA titles and a third place finish in 1974.

    Wilkes was part of UCLA teams that won a record 88 consecutive games.

    He was also a first-team Academic All-American in 1972, 1973 and 1974.

59. Rick Barry, Miami (FL)

42 of 100

    Richard Francis Dennis Barry III (Rick)

    Position: Forward
    Height: 6'7" ▪ Weight: 205 lbs.
    College: Miami

    Career Scoring Average: 29.8 ppg

    Rebounds: 16.5 rpg

    1964-65 NCAA AP All-America (1st)

    As a senior, Barry led the NCAA with a 37.4 points per game average.

    Barry is on the elite list of college players who have scored 2,000 points and grabbed 1,000 rebounds

58. J.J. Redick, Duke

43 of 100

    Streeter Lecka/Getty Images

    Jonathan Clay Redick (J.J.)

    Position: Guard
    Height: 6'4" ▪ Weight: 190 lbs.
    College: Duke

    Career Scoring Average: 19.9 ppg

    Assists: 2.2 apg

    ACC Men's Basketball Player of the Year (2004-05, 2005-06)

    2004-05 NCAA AP All-America (1st)
    2005-06 NCAA AP All-America (1st)

    2005-06 NCAA AP Player of the Year
    2005-06 NCAA John R. Wooden Award
    2005-06 NCAA Naismith Men's College Player of the Year Award

    Redick finished his career with an NCAA-record 457 three-point field goals, shooting 40.4 percent from three-point range.

    Redick is currently the all-time leading scorer for Duke.

57. Bob Pettit, LSU

44 of 100

    Robert Lee Pettit Jr. (Bob)

    Position: Forward-Center
    Height: 6'9" ▪ Weight: 205 lbs.
    College: LSU

    Career Scoring Average: 27.4 ppg

    Rebounds: 14.6 rpg

    1951-52 NCAA AP All-America (2nd)
    1952-53 NCAA AP All-America (2nd)
    1953-54 NCAA AP All-America (1st)

    He was a three-time All-SEC selection.

    During his junior year, Pettit led the Tigers to their second SEC title (their first came in 1935) and their first NCAA Final Four.

    In his senior season, Pettit averaged 31.4 points and 17.3 rebounds per game and once again led LSU to an SEC championship.

56. Alonzo Mourning, Georgetown

45 of 100

    Getty Images/Getty Images

    Alonzo Mourning (Zo)

    Position: Center
    Height: 6'10" ▪ Weight: 240 lbs.
    College: Georgetown

    Career Scoring Average: 16.7 ppg

    Rebounds: 8.6 rpg

    Mourning, a defensive force in the paint, led the nation in blocked shots his freshman year (169)  and ended up with 453 blocks over his four-year collegiate career.

    Mourning averaged 21.3 points and 10.7 rebounds per game his senior season.

    1988-89 NCAA AP All-America (3rd)
    1989-90 NCAA AP All-America (2nd)
    1991-92 NCAA AP All-America (1st)

55. Darrell Griffith, Louisville

46 of 100

    Darrell Steven Griffith (Dr. Dunkenstein)

    Position: Guard
    Height: 6'4" ▪ Weight: 190 lbs.
    College: Louisville (1976-80)

    Career Scoring Average: 20.1 ppg

    Rebounds: 5.0 rpg

    1979-80 NCAA AP All-America (1st)

    1979-80 NCAA Final Four Most Outstanding Player
    1979-80 NCAA John R. Wooden Award

    Griffith led the Cardinals to the 1980 NCAA Men's Basketball Championship by scoring 23 points in the Cardinals' 59-54 win over UCLA.

    With over 2,333 career points, he left college as Louisville's all-time career scoring leader.

54. Sean Elliott, Arizona

47 of 100

    Robert Laberge/Getty Images

    Sean Michael Elliott (Ninja)

    Position: Forward
    Height: 6'8" ▪ Weight: 205 lbs.
    College: Arizona

    Career Scoring Average: 19.2 ppg

    Rebounds: 6.1 rpg

    Assists: 3.4 apg

    1987-88 NCAA AP All-America (1st)
    1988-89 NCAA AP All-America (1st)

    1988-89 NCAA AP Player of the Year
    1988-89 NCAA John R. Wooden Award

    A pure shooter, Elliott shot a smoking .456 from beyond the arc for his college career.

    In his senior year, Elliott averaged 22.3 points, 7.2 rebounds and 4.1 assists on his way to winning multiple player of the year awards.

    During his career at Arizona, Elliott surpassed Lew Alcindor as the Pac-10's all-time leading scorer.

53. Kent Benson, Indiana

48 of 100

    Michael Kent Benson (Kent, Benny)

    Position: Center
    Height: 6'10" ▪ Weight: 235 lbs.
    College: Indiana

    Career Scoring Average: 15.3 ppg

    Rebounds: 9.0 rpg

    1975-76 NCAA AP All-America (1st)
    1976-77 NCAA AP All-America (1st)

    1975-76 NCAA Final Four Most Outstanding Player

    In his sophomore season, Benson helped lead the Hoosiers to an undefeated conference record (18-0) and on to an Elite Eight appearance.

    In Benson's junior season, he, along with Quinn Buckner and Scott May, took the Hoosiers to the NCAA Division I men's basketball championship.

    In that season, they were undefeated throughout the entire regular season and postseason. That team was the last Division I men's basketball team to accomplish that feat.

52. Gail Goodrich, UCLA

49 of 100

    Gail Charles Goodrich Jr. (Stumpy)

    Position: Guard
    Height: 6'1" ▪ Weight: 170 lbs. 
    College: UCLA

    Career Scoring Average: 19.0 ppg

    Rebounding: 4.7 rpg

    1964-65 NCAA AP All-America (1st)

    Goodrich finished his collegiate career as the school's all-time leading scorer and played on the school's first two national championship teams in 1964 and 1965.

    In the 1965 NCAA championship game, he scored a record 42 points as UCLA beat favored Michigan. This record stood until 1973, when Bill Walton scored 44 in the finals vs. Memphis State.

51. Bobby Hurley, Duke

50 of 100

    Jonathan Daniel/Getty Images

    Robert Matthew Hurley (Bobby)

    Position: Guard
    Height: 6'0" ▪ Weight: 165 lbs.
    College: Duke (1989-93)

    Career Scoring Average: 12.4 ppg

    Assists: 7.7 apg

    1991-92 NCAA AP All-America (3rd)
    1992-93 NCAA AP All-America (1st)

    1991-92 NCAA Final Four Most Outstanding Player

    Hurley went to the Final Four three times and led the Blue Devils to back-to-back national championships in 1991 and 1992.

    Hurley remains the NCAA all-time assists leader with 1,076 assists.

    In 2002, Hurley was named to the ACC 50th Anniversary men's basketball team as one of the 50 greatest players in Atlantic Coast Conference history.

50. John Lucas, Maryland

51 of 100

    John Harding Lucas Jr. (Luke)

    Position: Guard
    Height: 6'3" ▪ Weight: 175 lbs.
    College: Maryland

    Career Scoring Average: 18.3 ppg

    Rebounds: 3.4 rpg

    1973-74 NCAA AP All-America (2nd)
    1974-75 NCAA AP All-America (2nd)
    1975-76 NCAA AP All-America (1st)

    Lucas finished his career as the Terrapins' all-time leader in points (2,015) and assists (514).

    Lucas also was All-American in tennis his junior and senior years.

49. Rick Mount, Purdue

52 of 100

    Richard Carl Mount (Rick, The Rocket)

    Position: Guard
    Height: 6'3" ▪ Weight: 175 lbs.
    College: Purdue

    Career Average Scoring: 32.3 ppg

    1967-68 NCAA AP All-America (3rd)
    1968-69 NCAA AP All-America (1st)
    1969-70 NCAA AP All-America (1st)

    Mount was one of the best pure shooters in college basketball history.

    In his sophomore year, Mount averaged 28.4 points a game and was named third team All-American and First Team All-Big Ten.

    In his junior year, Mount averaged 33.3 ppg and was selected as a first team All-American and Big Ten Player of the Year.

    His senior year, Mount scored 35.4 ppg and took second his straight first team All-American and Big Ten Player of the Year honors.

    He also still holds the conference career scoring average record with 32.3 points per game, which is seventh all-time nationally.

48. Marques Johnson, UCLA

53 of 100

    Marques Kevin Johnson (M.J.)

    Position: Forward-Guard
    Height: 6'7" ▪ Weight: 218 lbs.
    College: UCLA (1973-77)

    Career Scoring Averages: 14.4 ppg

    Rebounding: 7.8 rpg

    1976-77 NCAA AP All-America (1st)

    1976-77 NCAA AP Player of the Year
    1976-77 NCAA John R. Wooden Award
    1976-77 NCAA Naismith Men's College Player of the Year Award

    In his sophomore year in college (1974-75), Johnson helped to lead the Bruins to what was John Wooden's 10th and final NCAA men's Division I basketball championship. 

    In his senior season, Johnson averaged 21.1 points and 11.1 rebounds per game, which led to his winning multiple player of the year awards.

47. Grant Hill, Duke

54 of 100

    Doug Pensinger/Getty Images

    Grant Henry Hill

    Position: Forward
    Height: 6'8" ▪ Weight: 225 lbs.
    College: Duke

    Career Scoring Average: 14.9 ppg

    Rebounding: 6.0 rpg

    Assists: 3.6 apg

    1992-93 NCAA AP All-America (3rd)
    1993-94 NCAA AP All-America (1st)

    Hill demonstrated his versatility by being the first player in ACC history to collect more than 1,900 points, 700 rebounds, 400 assists, 200 steals and 100 blocked shots.

    While Hill played for the Blue Devils, they won national titles in 1991 and 1992, where Duke became the first Division I program to win consecutive titles since UCLA in 1973.

46. Wes Unseld, Louisville

55 of 100

    Westley Sissel Unseld (Wes)

    Position: Center-Forward
    Height: 6'7" ▪ Weight: 245 lbs.
    College: Louisville (1965-68)

    Career Scoring Averages: 20.6 ppg

    Rebounds: 18.9 rpg

    1966-67 NCAA AP All-America (1st)
    1967-68 NCAA AP All-America (1st)

    Unseld led the Missouri Valley Conference in rebounding in 1966, 1967 and 1968, grabbing 1,551 rebounds over his three years.

45. Clyde Lovellette, Kansas

56 of 100

    Clyde Edward Lovellette

    Position: Center-Forward
    Height: 6'9" ▪ Weight: 234 lbs.
    College: Kansas (1949-52)

    1949-50 NCAA AP All-America (3rd)
    1950-51 NCAA AP All-America (1st)
    1951-52 NCAA AP All-America (1st)

    1951-52 Helms College Player of the Year

    1951-52 NCAA Final Four Most Outstanding Player

    Lovellette led the Big Seven in scoring in each of his three seasons and led the nation in scoring his senior year (28.4 ppg).

    He led Jayhawks to the 1952 NCAA title, capturing MOP honors and scoring a then-NCAA-record 141 points.

    He is still the only college player to lead the nation in scoring and win the NCAA title in the same year.

    One of Lovellette's teammates at Kansas was college basketball coaching legend Dean Smith.

44. Cazzie Russell, Michigan

57 of 100

    Cazzie Lee Russell Jr.

    Position: Forward-Guard
    Height: 6'5" ▪ Weight: 218 lbs.
    College: Michigan

    Career Scoring Average: 27.1 ppg

    1963-64 NCAA AP All-America (2nd)
    1964-65 NCAA AP All-America (1st)
    1965-66 NCAA AP All-America (1st)

    1965-66 NCAA AP Player of the Year

    Russell averaged 30.8 points per game, in his senior season, and was named the College Basketball Player of the Year.

    He led the Wolverines to three consecutive Big Ten titles (1964-66) and to Final Four appearances in 1964 and 1965.

    Russell finished his career with 2,163 points, breaking Bill Buntin's mark by 439 points. He set a new single-season scoring record in each of his three seasons.

    His career 27.1 points per game average is still tops in Michigan history.

44. Chris Mullin, St. John's

58 of 100

    johnnyjungle.com

    Christopher Paul Mullin (Chris)

    Position: Forward-Guard
    Height: 6'6" ▪ Weight: 200 lbs.
    College: St. Johns (1981-85)

    Career Scoring Average: 19.5 ppg

    Rebounds: 4.1

    1983-84 NCAA AP All-America (2nd)
    1984-85 NCAA AP All-America (1st)

    1984-85 NCAA John R. Wooden Award

    Mullins was named Big East Player of the Year three times.

    He is also one of only two players in history to win the Haggerty Award (given to the best college player in the New York City area) three times (1983-1985).

42. Earl Monroe, Winston-Salem State University

59 of 100

    Jason Kempin/Getty Images

    Vernon Earl Monroe (Earl, The Pearl, Black Jesus)

    Position: Guard
    Height: 6'3" ▪ Weight: 185 lbs.
    College: Winston-Salem State University

    Career Scoring Average: 26.7 ppg

    Rebounds: 6.9 rpg

    In his senior season, Monroe scored an amazing 41.5 points per game. Because of his outstanding performance, Monroe earned NCAA College Division II Player of the Year honors.

    Monroe led the Rams to the 1967 NCAA College Division II Championship.

41. Adrian Dantley, Notre Dame

60 of 100

    Jonathan Daniel/Getty Images

    Adrian Delano Dantley (A.D.)

    Position: Forward-Guard
    Height: 6'5" ▪ Weight: 208 lbs.
    College: Notre Dame

    Career Scoring Average: 25.8 ppg

    Rebounds: 9.8 rpg

    1974-75 NCAA AP All-America (1st)
    1975-76 NCAA AP All-America (1st)

    1976 National Player of the Year

    As a freshman, he played an important role in one of the biggest games in college basketball history, Notre Dame's stunning 1973 upset to end UCLA's record 88-game winning streak.

    Dantley was a prolific scorer, averaging 30.4 ppg his junior year and 28.6 ppg his senior season.

    Being a smaller shooting forward didn't stop Dantley from pulling down his share of rebounds. He averaged 10.2 rpg his junior year and 10.1 rpg his senior season.

40. Larry Johnson, UNLV

61 of 100

    Ken Levine/Getty Images

    Larry Demetric Johnson (Grandmama)

    Position: Forward
    Height: 6'6" ▪ Weight: 250 lbs.
    College: UNLV

    Career Scoring Average: 21.6 ppg

    Rebounds: 11.2 rpg

    1989-90 NCAA AP All-America (1st)
    1990-91 NCAA AP All-America (1st)

    1990-91 NCAA John R. Wooden Award
    1990-91 NCAA Naismith Men's College Player of the Year Award

    Johnson was a big part of one of the most dominant teams in NCAA history.

    Johnson helped lead UNLV to the 1990 NCAA Championship, defeating Duke 103-73, setting records for the highest score in a championship game and the largest margin of victory.

    As a senior, Johnson led the Running Rebels to a regular season sweep of opponents (27-0) by an average of 26.7 points a game. UNLV fell short of repeating as national champions in 1991, being defeated in the Final Four semifinals by eventual champion Duke.

39. Hakeem Olajuwon, Houston

62 of 100

    Tim DeFrisco/Getty Images

    Hakeem Abdul Olajuwon (The Dream)

    Position: Center
    Height: 7'0" ▪ Weight: 255 lbs.
    College: Houston

    Career Scoring Average: 13.3 ppg

    Rebounds: 10.7 rpg

    1983-84 NCAA AP All-America (1st)

    1982-83 NCAA Final Four Most Outstanding Player

    Olajuwon did not play basketball until the age of 15. He had been a soccer goalie, which no doubt helped his footwork and agility.

    In his sophomore and junior years at Houston, Olajuwon helped the Cougars advance to consecutive NCAA championship games: North Carolina State (1983) and Georgetown (1984).

    Olajuwon has the distinction of being the last player on the losing team to win the Final Four Most Outstanding Player award.

38. Austin Carr, Notre Dame

63 of 100

    http://www.und.com

    Austin George Carr

    Position: Guard
    Height: 6'4" ▪ Weight: 200 lbs.
    College: Notre Dame

    Career Scoring Average: 34.6 ppg

    Rebounds: 7.3 rpg

    1969-70 NCAA AP All-America (2nd)
    1970-71 NCAA AP All-America (1st)

    1970-71 NCAA AP Player of the Year
    1970-71 NCAA Naismith Men's College Player of the Year Award

    Carr finished his collegiate career with 2,560 points, ranking him fifth all-time in college basketball history at the time of his departure.

    During his final two seasons, Carr became only the second college player (along with Pete Maravich) ever to tally more than 1,000 points in a season.

37. Bob Cousy, Holy Cross

64 of 100

    Robert Joseph Cousy (Bob, Cooz, Houdini of the Hardwood)

    Position: Guard
    Height: 6'1" ▪ Weight: 175 lbs.
    College: Holy Cross

    College Career Scoring Average: 15.2 ppg

    1947-48 NCAA AP All-America (3rd)
    1948-49 NCAA AP All-America (2nd)
    1949-50 NCAA AP All-America (1st)

    Cousy was instrumental in transforming the position of point guard and the game of college basketball with his wide-open, inventive style of play. He became known for his behind-the-back dribbling and no-look, behind-the-back and half-court passes.

    Cousy led Holy Cross to 26 consecutive wins and a second place finish in the NIT (the primary postseason tournament in that era).

36. Blake Griffin, Oklahoma

65 of 100

    Joe Murphy/Getty Images

    Blake Austin Griffin

    Position: Forward
    Height: 6'10" ▪ Weight: 251 lbs.
    College: Oklahoma

    Career Scoring Average: 18.8 ppg

    Rebounds: 11.8 rpg

    2008-09 NCAA AP All-America (1st)

    2008-09 NCAA AP Player of the Year
    2008-09 NCAA John R. Wooden Award
    2008-09 NCAA Naismith Men's College Player of the Year Award

    While Griffin was only around two years, he left his imprint on college basketball.

    During his freshman year, Griffin was named to the Big 12 Conference First Team, as well as the "All Rookie First Team." No Sooner had made the conference "All-Rookie" team since Wayman Tisdale in 1983.

    During his sophomore year, Griffin finished the 2008-09 season with a Big 12 Conference record of 30 double-doubles, which was one short of the NCAA record of 31 set by David Robinson in 1986-1987.

    Griffin also set a record for the most rebounds in Big 12 Conference history in a single season with 504.

    He is only the third player in OU men's basketball history to score at least 40 points and grab 20 rebounds in a game: 40 points and 23 rebounds against Texas Tech (Wayman Tisdale: 61 points, 22 rebounds against Texas-San Antonio in 1983; and Alvan Adams: 43 points, 25 boards against Iowa State in 1975).

35. John Wooden, Purdue

66 of 100

    John Robert Wooden (The Indiana Rubber Man)

    Position: Guard
    College: Purdue

    Most people know about John Wooden because of his legendary success as the head coach of UCLA.

    Before he was chalking up championships on the sidelines in Westwood, he was a huge success on the hardwood as a player for Purdue (1930-32).

    He won his first national championship not as a coach, but as a player at Purdue in 1932.

    Wooden averaged 8.9 and 8.2 points per game in his first two years playing for the Boilermakers.

    Wooden established a new scoring standard with an unheard-of 12.1 points per game his senior season.

    In his last game as a Boilermaker, he equaled his own single-game record with 21 points in a 53-18 victory over Chicago.

    Wooden was the first guard ever to lead the Big Ten Conference in scoring.

    The Helms Foundation also named Wooden the Player of the Year for 1932.

    Wooden was the first player ever to be named basketball All-American three times.

    Wooden was named a member of the Basketball Hall of Fame as a player (inducted in 1961) and as a coach (in 1973), the first person ever honored in both categories.

34. David Robinson, Navy

67 of 100

    David Maurice Robinson (The Admiral)

    Position: Center
    Height: 7'1" ▪ Weight: 235 lbs.
    College: Navy

    College Career Scoring Average: 21.0 ppg

    Rebounds: 10.3 rpg

    1985-86 NCAA AP All-America (3rd)
    1986-87 NCAA AP All-America (1st)

    1986-87 NCAA AP Player of the Year
    1986-87 NCAA John R. Wooden Award
    1986-87 NCAA Naismith Men's College Player of the Year Award

    Robinson is widely considered the best basketball player in U.S. Naval Academy history.

    During his senior year, Robinson averaged 28.2 points and 11.8 rebounds per game.

    For his four-year college career, Robinson connected on .613 shooting from the field and blocked 516 shots.

    "The Admiral" holds the NCAA record for double-doubles in a season (1986-87) with 31.

    After graduating from the Naval Academy, Robinson became a civil engineer officer at the King's Island submarine base in Georgia. The Navy excused him from three years of the normal five years of his military commitment following graduation from the Naval Academy. He served two years before being able to begin his NBA career with the San Antonio Spurs.

33. Mark Aguirre, DePaul

68 of 100

    Mark Anthony Aguirre

    Position: Forward-Guard
    Height: 6'6" ▪ Weight: 232 lbs.
    College: DePaul

    Career Scoring Average: 24.5 ppg

    Rebounds: 7.9 rpg

    Assists: 3.3 apg

    1979-80 NCAA AP All-America (1st)
    1980-81 NCAA AP All-America (1st)

    1979-80 NCAA AP Player of the Year
    1979-80 NCAA Naismith Men's College Player of the Year Award

    Mark Aguirre averaged 24.0 points as a freshman in 1978-79 and led the Blue Demons to the NCAA Final Four.

    In the next two seasons, the Blue Demons had identical 26-2 records but were upset in the first round of the tournament both years.

    Aguirre was a long-distance sharpshooter, connecting on .546 from the field over his three-year career at DePaul.

32. George Mikan, DePaul

69 of 100

    George Lawrence Mikan Jr. (Mr. Basketball)

    Position: Center
    Height: 6'10" ▪ Weight: 245 lbs.
    College: DePaul

    Career Scoring Average: 19.1 ppg

    Mikan is seen as one of the pioneers of professional basketball, redefining it as a game for big men. This idea was revolutionary because at the time it was believed that tall players were too awkward to ever play basketball well.

    Mikan surprised the basketball world with his exceptional scoring prowess and his unique ability of goaltending (in Mikan's time it was legal because it was rare that anyone could reach that high).

    When DePaul won the 1945 National Invitation Tournament, Mikan was named MVP for scoring 120 points in three games, including 53 points in a 97-53 win over Rhode Island, equalling the score of the entire Rhode Island team.

    Mikan was named an All-American three times and the Helms NCAA College Player of the Year twice, in 1944 and 1945.

31. Sam Perkins, North Carolina

70 of 100

    Joe Patronite/Getty Images

    Samuel Bruce Perkins (Sam, Big Smooth)

    Position: Forward-Center
    Height: 6'9" ▪ Weight: 235 lbs.
    College: North Carolina

    Career Scoring Average: 15.9 ppg

    Rebounds: 8.6 rpg

    1981-82 NCAA AP All-America (2nd)
    1982-83 NCAA AP All-America (1st)
    1983-84 NCAA AP All-America (1st)

    Alongside Michael Jordan and James Worthy, Perkins was a member of the 1982 NCAA champion North Carolina Tar Heels.

    Perkins is on the elite list of college players who have scored 2,000 points and amassed 1,000 rebounds (2,145/1,167).

    In 2002, Perkins was named to the ACC 50th Anniversary men's basketball team as one of the 50 greatest players in Atlantic Coast Conference history.

30. James Worthy, North Carolina

71 of 100

    James Ager Worthy

    Position: Forward
    Height: 6'9" ▪ Weight: 225 lbs.
    College: North Carolina

    Career Scoring Average: 14.5 ppg

    Rebounds: 7.4 rpg

    1981-82 NCAA AP All-America (1st)

    1981-82 NCAA Final Four Most Outstanding Player

    As a sophomore, he was a key member of UNC's 1981 NCAA runner-up team.

    As a junior power forward, Worthy was the leading scorer (15.6 points per game) of a Tar Heel NCAA championship team that featured future NBA stars Sam Perkins and freshman Michael Jordan.

    In the championship game, Worthy shot 13-of-17 from the field, scored 28 points and had four rebounds.

    Worthy, known for his strong inside and mid-range game, shot .541 from the floor over his three years in Chapel Hill.

    In 2002, Worthy was named to the ACC 50th Anniversary men's basketball team as one of the 50 greatest players in Atlantic Coast Conference history.

29. Calvin Murphy, Niagara

72 of 100

    Calvin Jerome Murphy (Cal)

    Position: Guard
    Height: 5'9" ▪ Weight: 165 lbs.
    College: Niagara (1966-70)

    Career Scoring Average: 33.1 ppg

    Rebounding: 4.0 rpg

    1967-68 NCAA AP All-America (2nd)
    1968-69 NCAA AP All-America (1st)
    1969-70 NCAA AP All-America (1st)

    Murphy is one of the top scorers in NCAA history.

    In three years at Niagara, Murphy scored 2,541 points in a mere 77 games.

    During his freshman year (in this time, freshmen played a separate schedule), Murphy scored 48 points per game.

    During his sophomore season,  Murphy scored an incredible 38.2 points per game, which in most years would have been the highest in the nation by far. However, Murphy finished second to Pete Maravich in scoring that season.

    Murphy followed that up by scoring 32.4 and 29.4 in his junior and senior seasons, respectively.

    While Murphy was a great overall shooter, he was particularly known for his free throw shooting ( .849 for his college career).

    Murphy tallied 30 or more points in 42 of 77 games, 30-39 points 23 times, 40-49 points 13 times and 50 or more points six times.

28. Scott May, Indiana

73 of 100

    Scott Glenn May

    Position: Forward
    Height: 6'7" ▪ Weight: 215 lbs.
    College: Indiana (1973-76)

    Career Scoring Average: 17.7 ppg

    Rebounds: 6.6 rpg

    1974-75 NCAA AP All-America (1st)
    1975-76 NCAA AP All-America (1st)

    1975-76 NCAA AP Player of the Year
    1975-76 NCAA Naismith Men's College Player of the Year Award

    During May's sophomore year, he led them to an undefeated regular season. However, May broke his arm in the last week of the season, and Indiana was beaten in the regional finals of the NCAA Tournament.

    May averaged 23.6 points and 7.7 rebounds during his junior year in which Indiana went undefeated en route to winning the 1976 NCAA national championship.

    During his three years at Indiana, the Hoosiers went 86-6.

27. Tyler Hansbrough, North Carolina

74 of 100

    Gregory Shamus/Getty Images

    Andrew Tyler Hansbrough

    Position: Forward
    Height: 6'9" ▪ Weight: 250 lbs.
    College: North Carolina

    Career Scoring Average: 20.2 ppg

    Rebounds: 8.6 rpg

    2005-06 NCAA AP All-America (3rd)
    2006-07 NCAA AP All-America (2nd)
    2007-08 NCAA AP All-America (1st)
    2008-09 NCAA AP All-America (1st)

    2007-08 NCAA AP Player of the Year
    2007-08 NCAA John R. Wooden Award
    2007-08 NCAA Naismith Men's College Player of the Year Award

    Tyler Hansbrough was the first freshman ever to lead the University of North Carolina in scoring with an average of 18.9 points per game. He was unanimously selected as the 2006 ACC Freshman of the Year.

    Hansbrough led the ACC in scoring both his junior and senior seasons.

    During Hansbrough's junior season, North Carolina lost in the national semifinals of the 2008 NCAA tournament to Kansas.

    During his senior year, the Tar Heels won their fifth NCAA title by defeating Michigan State.

    Hansbrough became the fifth player in ACC history to lead his school in scoring in four straight seasons (with Virginia's Jeff Lamp 1978-81, Georgia Tech's Mark Price 1983-86, Duke's Johnny Dawkins 1983-86 and Clemson's Greg Buckner 1995-98).

    Hansbrough holds the NCAA all-time record for career made free throws with 968.

    He is the first player in ACC history to be unanimously selected four times to the ACC All-Conference Team.

    Hansbrough is on the elite list of college players who have scored 2,000 points and compiled 1,000 rebounds (2,872/1,219 in 142 games).

26. Shaquille O'Neal, LSU

75 of 100

    Getty Images/Getty Images

    Shaquille Rashaun O'Neal (Shaq)

    Position: Center
    Height: 7'1" ▪ Weight: 325 lbs.
    College: LSU

    Career Scoring Average: 21.6 ppg

    Rebounds: 13.5 rpg

    1990-91 NCAA AP All-America (1st)
    1991-92 NCAA AP All-America (1st)

    1990-91 NCAA AP Player of the Year

    O'Neal, a dominant force on both ends of the court, was a two-time SEC Player of the Year.

    He holds the NCAA record for blocked shots in a game with 17 blocks against Mississippi State on December 3, 1990.

    For his three-year college career, O'Neal shot .610 from the field.

25. Tim Duncan, Wake Forest

76 of 100

    Doug Pensinger/Getty Images

    Timothy Theodore Duncan (Tim, The Big Fundamental)

    Position: Forward-Center
    Height: 6'11" ▪ Weight: 248 lbs.
    College: Wake Forest (1993-97)

    Career Scoring Average: 16.5 ppg

    Rebounds: 12.3 rpg

    1994-95 NCAA AP All-America (3rd)
    1995-96 NCAA AP All-America (1st)
    1996-97 NCAA AP All-America (1st)

    1996-97 NCAA AP Player of the Year
    1996-97 NCAA John R. Wooden Award
    1996-97 NCAA Naismith Men's College Player of the Year Award

    Tim Duncan did so many things incredibly well beyond simply scoring points.

    He was a National Association of College Basketball Coaches pick as Defensive Player of the Year an unprecedented three times—1995, 1996 and 1997.

    Duncan left college as the all-time leading shot-blocker in ACC history with 481 blocks and was second in NCAA history at that time.

    Duncan is on the elite list of college players who have scored 2,000 points and grabbed 1,000 rebounds (2,117/1,570 in 128 games)

    Tim Duncan was the first player in NCAA history to reach 2,000 points, 1,500 rebounds, 400 blocked shots and 200 assists.

24. Phil Ford, North Carolina

77 of 100

    Phil Jackson Ford Jr.

    Position: Guard
    Height: 6'2" ▪ Weight: 175 lbs.
    College: North Carolina

    Career Scoring Average: 18.6 ppg

    1975-76 NCAA AP All-America (2nd)
    1976-77 NCAA AP All-America (1st)
    1977-78 NCAA AP All-America (1st)

    1977-78 NCAA John R. Wooden Award

    Phil Ford was the key to coach Dean Smith's groundbreaking Four Corners offense, which revolutionized the game and eventually brought on the establishing of the shot clock in college basketball.

    Ford was the No. 1 all-time scorer in UNC history until Tyler Hansbrough broke the mark.

    He was a three-time All-ACC Player, twice ACC Player of the Year and 1978 National Player of the Year.

    Ford finished his career as the only player in ACC history to score over 2,000 points and register at least 600 assists (a record now shared with Travis Best of Georgia Tech and Greivis Vasquez of Maryland).

    In 2002, Ford was named to the ACC 50th Anniversary men's basketball team as one of the 50 greatest players in Atlantic Coast Conference history.

23. Danny Manning, Kansas

78 of 100

    Getty Images/Getty Images

    Daniel Ricardo Manning (Danny, D)

    Position: Forward-Center
    Height: 6'10" ▪ Weight: 230 lbs.
    College: Kansas

    Career Scoring Average: 20.1 ppg

    Rebounding: 8.1 rpg

    1985-86 NCAA AP All-America (2nd)
    1986-87 NCAA AP All-America (1st)
    1987-88 NCAA AP All-America (1st)

    1987-88 NCAA Final Four Most Outstanding Player
    1987-88 NCAA John R. Wooden Award
    1987-88 NCAA Naismith Men's College Player of the Year Award

    Manning left KU as its men's basketball program's all-time leading scorer (2,951, as well as the Big Eight all-time scoring leader) and rebounder (1,187) after leading the Jayhawks to the 1986 Final Four and winning the 1988 NCAA championship.

    The Jayhawks' championship run was one of the most unlikely paths to a championship because of Kansas' less than spectacular season record of 21-11.

    Manning was named the Big Eight Player of the Decade—1980s.

    Manning is on the elite list of college players who have scored 2,000 points and pulled down 1,000 rebounds (2,951/1,187 in 147 games).

22. Tom Gola, La Salle

79 of 100

    Thomas Joseph Gola (Tom, Mr. All-Around)

    Position: Guard-Forward
    Height: 6'6" ▪ Weight: 205 lbs.
    College: LaSalle

    Career Scoring Average: 20.9 ppg

    Rebounds: 18.7 rpg

    1952-53 NCAA AP All-America (1st)
    1953-54 NCAA AP All-America (1st)
    1954-55 NCAA AP All-America (1st)

    1954 Helms Foundation College Basketball Player of the Year

    1952 NIT Championship, Co-MVP

    1953-54 NCAA Final Four Most Outstanding Player

    Tom Gola was one of the few players in his era capable of playing all five positions.

    At 6'6", Gola undoubtedly serves as an NCAA unlikely career rebounding record holder, averaging a jaw-dropping 18.7 boards per game.

    Gola led the Explorers to win the 1954 NCAA championship.

    Gola is on the elite list of college players who have scored 2,000 points with 1,000 rebounds (2,462/2,201 in 118 games).

21. Shane Battier, Duke

80 of 100

    Jamie Squire/Getty Images

    Shane Courtney Battier

    Position: Forward
    Height: 6'8" ▪ Weight: 220 lbs.
    College: Duke

    Career Scoring Average: 13.6 ppg

    Rebounds: 6.1 rpg

    1999-00 NCAA AP All-America (2nd)
    2000-01 NCAA AP All-America (1st)

    2000-01 NCAA AP Player of the Year
    2000-01 NCAA Final Four Most Outstanding Player
    2000-01 NCAA John R. Wooden Award
    2000-01 NCAA Naismith Men's College Player of the Year Award

    Shane Battier is easily the player on this list with the least spectacular numbers. If you only saw his basic stats of scoring, rebounds and assists, you wouldn't vote him for the All-ACC team in an individual year, let alone a Top 100 College Players of all time. 

    Battier has been called by Russell Huebsch "the ultimate glue guy" for playing sound, fundamental, team-oriented basketball, making his teammates more effective without flash or padding his own stats.

    Battier was a three-time awardee of the NABC Defensive Player of the Year.

    He led the Blue Devils to two Final Fours, in 1999 and 2001. The Blue Devils lost to the Connecticut Huskies in the 1999 finals but came back to win the national championship by defeating the Arizona Wildcats two years later.

    In 2002, Battier was named to the ACC 50th Anniversary men's basketball team as one of the 50 greatest players in Atlantic Coast Conference history.

20. Wayman Tisdale, Oklahoma

81 of 100

    Wayman Lawrence Tisdale

    Position: Forward-Center
    Height: 6'9" ▪ Weight: 240 lbs. 
    College: Oklahoma

    Career Scoring Average: 25.6 ppg

    Rebounds: 10.1 rpg

    1982-83 NCAA AP All-America (1st)
    1983-84 NCAA AP All-America (1st)
    1984-85 NCAA AP All-America (1st)

    Tisdale was a three-time Big Eight Conference Player of the Year.

    He was the first player in collegiate history to be named a first-team All American by the Associated Press in his freshman, sophomore and junior seasons

    Tisdale is the Sooners' all-time leader in scoring and rebounds

    Oklahoma posted a 84-20 record during Tisdale's three years.

    Tisdale is on the elite list of college players who have scored 2,000 points along with 1,000 rebounds (2,661/1,048 in 104 games).

19. Bill Bradley, Princeton

82 of 100

    William Warren Bradley (Bill, Dollar Bill)

    Position: Forward-Guard
    Height: 6'5" ▪ Weight: 205 lbs.
    College: Princeton

    Career Scoring Average: 30.2 ppg

    1962-63 NCAA AP All-America (2nd)
    1963-64 NCAA AP All-America (1st)
    1964-65 NCAA AP All-America (1st)

    1964-65 NCAA AP Player of the Year
    1964-65 NCAA Final Four Most Outstanding Player

    Bradley scored 2,503 points at Princeton. He was awarded the 1965 James E Sullivan award, presented annually to the United States' top amateur athlete, the first basketball player to win the honor.

    To this day, Bradley still holds several Ivy League records, including individual year and career scoring, as well as free throws attempted and made.

    In 1965, Bradley led Princeton to the Final Four. Princeton lost in the semifinals, but Bradley scored a record 58 points in the consolation game to lead them to victory against Bradley and earn himself the Final Four MVP.

    Bradley is on the elite list of college players who have scored 2,000 points and amassed 1,000 rebounds (2,503/1,008 in 83 games).

18. Christian Laettner, Duke

83 of 100

    Getty Images/Getty Images

    Christian Donald Laettner

    Position: Forward-Center
    Height: 6'11" ▪ Weight: 235 lbs.
    College: Duke

    College Career Scoring Average: 16.6 ppg

    Rebounds: 7.8 rpg

    1990-91 NCAA AP All-America (2nd)
    1991-92 NCAA AP All-America (1st)

    1990-91 NCAA Final Four Most Outstanding Player
    1991-92 NCAA AP Player of the Year
    1991-92 NCAA John R. Wooden Award
    1991-92 NCAA Naismith Men's College Player of the Year Award

    Christian Laettner is another example of a great player whose contributions extended far beyond his scoring and rebounding stats.

    Laettner is the only college player in history to start in four consecutive Final Fours. He also owns the record for most tournament games played, with 23 out of a maximum possible of 24 in four years (excluding the play-in game for the lowest seeds in one bracket).

    Other NCAA Tournament Records that Laettner holds:

    • Most points scored: 407
    • Most free throws made: 142
    • Most free throw attempts: 167

    Laettner, for a "big man," had a great outside shot. He connected on .485 of his shots beyond the arc in his four years at Duke.

    He is especially known for his game-winning last-second jump shot on March 28 in Duke's dramatic 104-103 victory over Kentucky in the East regional final.

    Laettner is on the elite list of college players who have scored 2,000 points and pulled down 1,000 rebounds (2,460/1,149 in 148 games).

    In 2002, Laettner was named to the ACC 50th Anniversary men's basketball team as one of the 50 greatest players in Atlantic Coast Conference history.

17. Ralph Sampson, Virginia

84 of 100

    Ralph Lee Sampson

    Position: Center-Forward
    Height: 7'4" ▪ Weight: 228 lbs.
    College: Virginia

    Career Average Scoring: 16.9 ppg

    Rebounds: 11.4 rpg

    1980-81 NCAA AP All-America (1st)
    1981-82 NCAA AP All-America (1st)
    1982-83 NCAA AP All-America (1st)

    1980-81 NCAA AP Player of the Year
    1980-81 NCAA Naismith Men's College Player of the Year Award
    1981-82 NCAA AP Player of the Year
    1981-82 NCAA John R. Wooden Award
    1981-82 NCAA Naismith Men's College Player of the Year Award
    1982-83 NCAA AP Player of the Year
    1982-83 NCAA John R. Wooden Award
    1982-83 NCAA Naismith Men's College Player of the Year Award

    The 7'4" Sampson was perhaps the most dominant individual player in ACC history, racking up three ACC Player of the Year Awards and an amazing three National Player of the Year Awards.

    Sampson blocked an amazing 462 shots in his four years at Virginia.

    Sampson led the Cavaliers to an NIT title in 1980, an NCAA Final Four appearance in 1981 and an NCAA Elite Eight appearance in 1983.

    Sampson is on the elite list of college players who have scored 2,000 points and grabbed 1,000 rebounds (2,225/1,511 in 132 games)

    In 2002, Sampson was named to the ACC 50th Anniversary men's basketball team as one of the 50 greatest players in Atlantic Coast Conference history.

16. David Thompson, North Carolina State

85 of 100

    theolist.blogspot.com

    David O'Neil Thompson (Skywalker)

    Position: Guard-Forward
    Height: 6'4" ▪ Weight: 195 lbs.
    College: North Carolina State

    College Career Scoring Average: 26.8 ppg

    Rebounds: 8.1 rpg

    1972-73 NCAA AP All-America (1st)
    1973-74 NCAA AP All-America (1st)
    1974-75 NCAA AP All-America (1st)

    1973-74 NCAA AP Player of the Year
    1973-74 NCAA Final Four Most Outstanding Player
    1974-75 NCAA AP Player of the Year
    1974-75 NCAA Naismith Men's College Player of the Year Award

    Thompson played at a time when the "slam dunk" was outlawed, though he made one anyway (and got a technical foul for it).

    His incredible vertical leap (purportedly 48 inches) allowed him to rise above most of his defenders.

    Thompson led NC State to an undefeated season and the 1974 NCAA championship as a sophomore.

    Thompson's best season was his senior year, in which he averaged 29.9 points and 8.1 rebounds per game.

    In 2002, Thompson was named to the ACC 50th Anniversary men's basketball team as one of the 50 greatest players in Atlantic Coast Conference history.

15. Patrick Ewing, Georgetown

86 of 100

    blog.mitchellandness.com

    Patrick Aloysius Ewing

    Position: Center-Forward
    Height: 7'0" ▪ Weight: 240 lbs.
    College: Georgetown

    Career Scoring Average: 15.3 ppg

    Rebounds: 9.2 rpg

    1982-83 NCAA AP All-America (1st)
    1983-84 NCAA AP All-America (1st)
    1984-85 NCAA AP All-America (1st)

    1983-84 NCAA Final Four Most Outstanding Player
    1984-85 NCAA AP Player of the Year
    1984-85 NCAA Naismith Men's College Player of the Year Award

    From his first games at Georgetown, Patrick Ewing established himself as a force in the middle.

    Over his four-year Hoya career, Ewing blocked a remarkable 493 shots and altered countless others.

    Ewing shot a smoking .620 percent, many coming from ferocious dunks.

    Ewing was one of the best college basketball players of his era, as Georgetown reached the championship game of the NCAA Tournament three out of four years.

    He is on the elite list of college players who have scored 2,000 points and grabbed 1,000 rebounds (2,184/1,316 in 143 games).  

14. Michael Jordan, North Carolina

87 of 100

    http://www.shoptradition.com

    Michael Jeffrey Jordan (Air Jordan, M.J.)

    Position: Guard-Forward
    Height: 6'6" ▪ Weight: 195 lbs. 
    College: North Carolina

    Career Scoring Average: 17.7 ppg

    Rebounds: 5.0 rpg

    1982-83 NCAA AP All-America (1st)
    1983-84 NCAA AP All-America (1st)

    1983-84 NCAA AP Player of the Year
    1983-84 NCAA John R. Wooden Award
    1983-84 NCAA Naismith Men's College Player of the Year Award

    Few players have made more of an impact on the sport of basketball than Michael Jordan.

    As a freshman in coach Dean Smith's team-oriented system, he was named ACC Freshman of the Year after he averaged 13.4 points per game. He made the game-winning jump shot in the 1982 NCAA championship game against Georgetown,

    In his junior year, Jordan won nearly every major player of the year award in the country.

    In 2002, Jordan was named to the ACC 50th Anniversary men's basketball team as one of the 50 greatest players in Atlantic Coast Conference history.

13. Isiah Thomas, Indiana

88 of 100

    Isiah Lord Thomas III

    Position: Guard
    Height: 6'1" ▪ Weight: 180 lbs. 
    College: Indiana

    Career Scoring Average: 15.4 ppg

    Rebounds: 3.5 rpg

    Assists: 5.7 apg

    1980-81 NCAA AP All-America (1st)

    1980-81 NCAA Final Four Most Outstanding Player

    In his two years of playing point guard for Bob Knight at Indiana, the Hoosiers were a combined 47-17, and Thomas was an all-Big Ten selection both years.

    In 1981, Thomas led the Hoosiers to the NCAA Tournament National Championship, where he earned the tournament's Most Outstanding Player award.

12. Larry Bird, Indiana State

89 of 100

    Larry Joe Bird (Larry Legend, The Hick from French Lick)

    Position: Forward
    Height: 6'9" ▪ Weight: 220 lbs.
    College: Indiana State University

    Career Scoring Average: 30.3 ppg

    Rebounds: 13.3 rpg

    Assists: 4.6 apg

    1977-78 NCAA AP All-America (1st)
    1978-79 NCAA AP All-America (1st)

    1978-79 NCAA AP Player of the Year
    1978-79 NCAA John R. Wooden Award
    1978-79 NCAA Naismith Men's College Player of the Year Award

    Larry Bird was one of the most unique players in college basketball history. For a player of size, he combined great shooting ability with an uncanny ability to find the open man.

    While Bird wasn't known for his quickness or leaping ability, he was an excellent rebounder and defender.

    Bird elevated Indiana State from being an also-ran mid-major program to an NCAA championship contender. Before Bird's time at ISU, the Sycamores had never been to the NCAA tournament.

    Bird led the team to the NCAA championship game in 1979, his senior season, only to lose to Michigan State.

    After his three seasons at Indiana State, he left as the fifth-highest scorer (2,850 points) in NCAA history.

    Bird is on the elite list of college players who have scored 2,000 points and pulled down 1,000 rebounds (2,850/1,247 in 94 games).

11. Elvin Hayes, Houston

90 of 100

    http://blogs.chron.com

    Elvin Ernest Hayes (The Big E)

    Position: Forward-Center
    Height: 6'9" ▪ Weight: 235 lbs.
    College: University of Houston

    Career Scoring Average: 31.0 ppg

    Rebounds: 17.2 rpg

    1966-67 NCAA AP All-America (1st)
    1967-68 NCAA AP All-America (1st)

    1967-68 NCAA AP Player of the Year

    In 1967, he led the Cougars to the Final Four of the 1967 NCAA Men's Division I basketball tournament. He would score 25 points and grab 24 rebounds in a semifinal loss to the eventual champion UCLA Bruins.

    His rebounding total is second to Bill Russell's Final Four record of 27.

    On January 20, 1968, Hayes and Houston faced the UCLA Bruins again in the first-ever nationally televised regular season college basketball game. In front of a record 52,693 fans at the Houston Astrodome, Hayes scored 39 points and had 15 rebounds while limiting Lew Alcindor to just 15 points, as Houston beat UCLA 71-69 to snap the Bruins' 47-game winning streak in what has been called the "Game of the Century".

    Hayes' senior year was one of the best seasons of any individual player in college basketball history. He averaged 36.8 points and 18.9 rebounds per game.

    Hayes and Don Chaney were the University of Houston's first African-American basketball players in 1966.

    Hayes is on the elite list of college players who have scored 2,000 points with 1,000 rebounds (2,888/1,602 in 93 games).

10. Jerry West, West Virginia

91 of 100

    http://www.bigbluehistory.net

    Jerry Alan West (Mr. Clutch, Zeke from Cabin Creek)

    Position: Guard-Forward
    Height: 6'2" ▪ Weight: 175 lbs.
    College: West Virginia

    College Career Scoring Average: 24.8 ppg

    Rebounds: 13.3 rpg

    1957-58 NCAA AP All-America (3rd)
    1958-59 NCAA AP All-America (1st)
    1959-60 NCAA AP All-America (1st)

    1958-59 NCAA Final Four Most Outstanding Player

    Jerry West, from the time he stepped on the West Virginia campus, excelled throughout his college basketball career. West combined great scoring with great rebounding.

    As impressive as his point totals were, his rebounding statistics were even more impressive considering his height.

    In his first varsity year, West scored 17.8 points per game and averaged 11.1 rebounds.

    For that, West was named to the first team All-Southern Conference, and he was selected as the Southern Conference Tournament Most Valuable Player.

    The next season (1958-59) was even more successful. West scored 26.6 points per game and grabbed 12.3 rebounds.He tied the NCAA five-game tournament record of 160 points (32.0 points per game) West was named Most Outstanding Player of that year's Final Four He was named also All-American, Southern Conference Tournament MVP and Southern Conference Player of the Year and Athlete of the Year.

    In West’s final collegiate season (1959-60), he averaged career highs in scoring (29.3 ppg) and rebounding (16.5 rpg).

     West is on the elite list of college players who have scored 2,000 points and compiled 1,000 rebounds (2,309/1,240 in 93 games).

     To this day, West still holds 12 West Virginia all-time records.

9. Elgin Baylor, Seattle

92 of 100

    Elgin Gay Baylor

    Position: Forward
    Height: 6'5" ▪ Weight: 225 lbs.
    College: Seattle University

    Career Scoring Average: 31.3 ppg

    Rebounds: 19.5 rpg

    1956-57 NCAA AP All-America (2nd)
    1957-58 NCAA AP All-America (1st)

    1957-58 NCAA Final Four Most Outstanding Player

    Elgin Baylor was an incredible all-around player. He regularly dazzled the fans at Seattle University with his acrobatic moves and his trademark hanging jump shot.

    Baylor, from his small forward position, ruled the court. In his first year, he averaged an eye-popping 29.7 points and 20.3 rebounds per game.

    In his final season, he scored 32.5 points and grabbed 19.3 boards per game.

    Baylor led the Seattle Chieftains to the NCAA championship game in 1958, falling to the Kentucky Wildcats.

    Baylor is on the elite list of college players who have scored 2,000 points and amassed 1,000 rebounds (2,500/1,559 in only 80 games).

8. Wilt Chamberlain, Kansas

93 of 100

    Wilton Norman Chamberlain (Wilt, Wilt the Stilt, the Big Dipper)

    Position: Center
    Height: 7'1" ▪ Weight: 275 lbs. 
    College: University of Kansas

    College Career Scoring Average: 29.9 ppg

    Rebounds: 18.3 rpg

    1956-57 NCAA AP All-America (1st)
    1957-58 NCAA AP All-America (1st)

    1956-57 NCAA Final Four Most Outstanding Player

    Few players changed the game of basketball more than Wilt Chamberlain. His sheer size and athleticism made him a dominant force throughout his career.

    More than just a player of size, Chamberlain was also skilled as a track and volleyball athlete. He ran the 100-yard dash in 10.9 seconds, shot put 56 feet, triple jumped more than 50 feet and won the high jump in the Big Eight track and field championships three straight years.

    Few players had as dramatic an entrance into college basketball as Chamberlain did. In his first varsity game, the center scored 52 points and grabbed 31 rebounds.

    Chamberlain led the Jayhawks to the 1957 NCAA championship game only to come up short against North Carolina. Chamberlain, in spite of being on the losing team, was still voted the Final Four Most Outstanding Player.

    In his second and final varsity year, Chamberlain averaged 30.1 points for the season and led the Jayhawks to an 18-5 record, with three games lost when he was out with an illness.

    Because KU came in second in the league and at the time only conference winners were invited to the NCAA tourney, the Jayhawks' season ended without Chamberlain having another chance to take Kansas to the championship game.

7. Magic Johnson, Michigan State

94 of 100

    Earvin Johnson Jr. (Magic)

    Position: Guard-Forward
    Height: 6'8" ▪ Weight: 215 lbs.
    College: Michigan State University

    College Career Scoring Average: 17.1 ppg

    Rebounds: 7.6 rpg

    Assists: 7.9 apg

    1977-78 NCAA AP All-America (3rd)
    1978-79 NCAA AP All-America (1st)

    1978-79 NCAA Final Four Most Outstanding Player

    A few players influence the game of basketball by their talent. Magic Johnson changed the position of point guard by the fact that he played with such skill and dexterity while being 6'8".

    As a freshman, Johnson averaged 17.0 points, 7.9 rebounds and 7.4 assists per game and led the Spartans to a 25-4 record and the Big Ten title. Michigan State narrowly lost in the Elite Eight to eventual champion Kentucky.

    As a sophomore, Johnson again led the Spartans in all facets of the game, averaging 17.1 points, 7.6 rebounds and 7.9 assists per game.

    Johnson led Michigan State to the NCAA championship game against Larry Bird and Indiana State. In what was the most watched college game in history, Michigan State won the championship, and Johnson was named Final Four Most Outstanding Player.

    While many players throughout the history of college basketball had better stats, few made as great of an impact on the sport as Magic Johnson did.

6. Jerry Lucas, Ohio State

95 of 100

    Jerry Ray Lucas (Luke)

    Position: Forward-Center
    Height: 6'8" ▪ Weight: 230 lbs. 
    College: Ohio State University

    Career Scoring Average: 24.3 ppg

    Rebounds: 17.2 rpg

    1959-60 NCAA AP All-America (1st)
    1960-61 NCAA AP All-America (1st)
    1961-62 NCAA AP All-America (1st)

    1959-60 NCAA Final Four Most Outstanding Player
    1960-61 NCAA AP Player of the Year
    1960-61 NCAA Final Four Most Outstanding Player
    1961-62 NCAA AP Player of the Year

    Its not too difficult for an outstanding player to excel when he is the focus of the team's strategy.

    It's another matter when a player can stand out significantly when surrounded by a collection of talented players. Jerry Lucas' career at Ohio State can be described as the latter of these two.

    Lucas came to Ohio State in the fall of 1958 with what some still say was the best college recruiting class ever (which included Mel Nowell, Bobby Knight and John Havlicek).

    Lucas, in order to prioritize his education, insisted on receiving an academic scholarship. This did not reduce Lucas' drive and work ethic to achieve greatness on the hardwood.

    Lucas, the consummate team player who took pride in the fact that all of his teammates also averaged double figures, still accomplished great individual achievements.

    Lucas didn't need time to adjust to the college game. In his first varsity season, Lucas averaged 26 ppg and 16.4 rpg.

    Lucas shot a scorching .624 from the field for his three-year career at Ohio State

    The Buckeyes went 78-6 over three years, winning the NCAA championship in Lucas' first year and making it to the finals in his remaining years, only to come up short both times.

    He was a three-time first team AP All-American, a two-time AP Player of the Year, two-time Final Four Most Outstanding Player and three-time Big Ten Player of the Year.

    In 1999, Lucas was named to Sports Illustrated's five-man College All-Century Team.

5. Pete Maravich, LSU

96 of 100

    http://theselvedgeyard.files.wordpress.com

    Peter Press Maravich (Pete, Pistol Pete)

    Position: Guard
    Height: 6'5" ▪ Weight: 197 lbs. 
    College: Louisiana State University

    Career Scoring Average: 44.2 ppg

    Rebounds: 6.5 rpg

    1967-68 NCAA AP All-America (1st)
    1968-69 NCAA AP All-America (1st)
    1969-70 NCAA AP All-America (1st)

    1969-70 NCAA AP Player of the Year
    1969-70 NCAA Naismith Men's College Player of the Year Award

    Pete Maravich was an extraordinary basketball player who combined an unparalleled talent to score with unbelievable ball-handling wizardry.

    He is the all-time leading NCAA Division I scorer with 3,667 points scored in only 83 games.

    In only three years playing for his father at LSU, Maravich averaged 43.8, 44.2 and 44.5 points per game. He, without question, led the NCAA in scoring in each of his three seasons.

    An amazing factor in his scoring average is that his career predated the three-point shot.

    Former LSU head basketball coach Dale Brown charted every college game Maravich played, taking into consideration all shots he took. Brown calculated that (at the NCAA rule of a three-point line at 19 feet (5.8 m), nine inches from the rim) Maravich would have averaged 13 three-point scores per game, increasing his career average to an absolutely ridiculous 57 points per game.

4. Bill Russell, San Francisco

97 of 100

    http://members.cox.net/bngolden1/basketballsnapshots8.htm

    William Felton Russell (Bill)

    Position: Center
    Height: 6'9" ▪ Weight: 215 lbs.
    College: San Francisco

    Career Scoring Average: 20.7 ppg

    Rebounds: 20.3 rpg

    1954-55 NCAA AP All-America (1st)
    1955-56 NCAA AP All-America (1st)

    1954-55 NCAA Final Four Most Outstanding Player

    Bill Russell set the gold standard by which every big man has been and is evaluated.

    While most people associate Russell's career success with his role as the centerpiece of the Celtics dynasty (won 11 championships in 13 years), he was just as successful in his three years in college.

    Russell led the University of San Francisco to two consecutive NCAA championships (1955, 1956), including a string of 55 consecutive victories.

    One of the things that sets Russell apart from other players is that he was more known for his shot-blocking and defense than his offense. UCLA coach John Wooden called Russell "the greatest defensive man I've ever seen."

    More than just using size and bulk to stop his opponents, Russell utilized quickness, positioning and footwork to dominate games on defense.

    In 1999, Russell was named to Sports Illustrated's five-man College All-Century Team.

3. Bill Walton, UCLA

98 of 100

    http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com

    William Theodore Walton III (Bill)

    Position: Center-Forward
    Height: 6'11" ▪ Weight: 210 lbs.
    College: UCLA

    Career Scoring Average: 20.3 ppg

    Rebounds: 15.7 rpg

    1971-72 NCAA AP All-America (1st)
    1972-73 NCAA AP All-America (1st)
    1973-74 NCAA AP All-America (1st)

    1971-72 NCAA AP Player of the Year
    1971-72 NCAA Final Four Most Outstanding Player
    1971-72 NCAA Naismith Men's College Player of the Year Award
    1972-73 NCAA AP Player of the Year
    1972-73 NCAA Final Four Most Outstanding Player
    1972-73 NCAA Naismith Men's College Player of the Year Award
    1973-74 NCAA Naismith Men's College Player of the Year Award

    Bill Walton was one of the great college basketball players of all time.

    He played at UCLA from 1971 to 1974, winning the national title in 1972 over Florida State and again in 1973 with an 87-66 win over Memphis State.

    In the Memphis State game, Walton made an impressive 21 of 22 field goal attempts and scored 44 points.

    The Walton-led 1971-72 UCLA team had a record of 30-0, winning its games by an average margin of more than 30 points. He was the backbone of two consecutive 30-0 seasons and was also part of UCLA's NCAA men's basketball record 88-game winning streak.

    From the standpoint of individual honors, Walton was selected as the Naismith Player of the Year Award winner all three of his varsity years with the Bruins.

    He was selected as the Final Four Most Outstanding Player for both of the times when UCLA won it all in Walton's three years.

    He was named to the Pacific 8 All-Conference first team three times and was conference player of the year for three consecutive years.

    Walton also earned Academic All-American honors three times.

    For his three years, Walton shot .651 from the field.

2. Oscar Robertson, Cincinnati

99 of 100

    http://www.sportswriters.net

    Oscar Palmer Robertson (The Big O, Horse, Donut)

    Position: Guard-Forward
    Height: 6'5" ▪ Weight: 205 lbs. 
    College: University of Cincinnati

    Career Scoring Average: 33.8 ppg

    Rebounds: 15.2 rpg

    Assists: 4.8 apg

    Without question, Oscar Robertson was one of the elite college basketball players of all time.

    In each of his three years, he won the national scoring title (35.1 ppg in 1958; 32.6 ppg in 1959; and 33.7 ppg in 1960), was named a first team All-American and was chosen College Player of the Year.

    He was the first player to lead the NCAA in scoring three straight years or to win National College Player of the Year honors three times.

    Robertson set 14 NCAA scoring records, 16 Missouri Valley Conference records and 19 University of Cincinnati school records.

    When Robertson finished his college career, he was the all-time leading NCAA scorer.

    He led the Bearcats to led Cincinnati to a 79-9 overall record during his three varsity seasons and to the Final Four in 1959 and '60.

    In 1999, Robertson was named to Sports Illustrated's five-man College All-Century Team.

    Robertson is on the elite list of college players who have scored 2,000 points and grabbed 1,000 rebounds (2,973/1,338 in 88 games).

1. Lew Alcindor, UCLA

100 of 100

    Ferdinand Lewis Alcindor Jr. (later Kareem Abdul-Jabbar)

    Position: Center
    Height: 7'2" ▪ Weight: 225 lbs.
    College: UCLA

    Career Scoring Average: 26.4 ppg

    Rebounds: 15.5 rpg

    1966-67 NCAA AP All-America (1st)
    1967-68 NCAA AP All-America (1st)
    1968-69 NCAA AP All-America (1st)

    1966-67 NCAA AP Player of the Year
    1966-67 NCAA Final Four Most Outstanding Player
    1967-68 NCAA Final Four Most Outstanding Player
    1968-69 NCAA AP Player of the Year
    1968-69 NCAA Final Four Most Outstanding Player
    1968-69 NCAA Naismith Men's College Player of the Year Award

    Lew Alcindor is the best college basketball player of all-time.

    Alcindor played three seasons for the UCLA Bruins from 1966-69, contributing to the team's three-year record of 88 wins and only two losses. UCLA won the national championship in all three of Alcindor's varsity years.

    Alcindor's dominant play changed the rules of the college game. The dunk was banned in college basketball after the 1967 season, primarily because of Alcindor's use of the shot. It was not allowed again until 1976.

    Alcindor is on the elite list of college players who have scored 2,000 points and grabbed 1,000 rebounds (2,325/1367 in 88 games)

    In 1999, Alcindor was named to Sports Illustrated's five-man College All-Century Team.