College Basketball Recruiting: Comparing Harrison Twins to NBA Players

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College Basketball Recruiting: Comparing Harrison Twins to NBA Players
photo appears on kentuckysportsradio.com

When most people hear about enticing and unique package deals, perhaps vacation packages come to mind. You know, something like the Priceline Negotiator getting you a great price on a hotel and airline combination.

However, college basketball fans (and certainly coaches) may think of something else entirely. I’m talking, of course, about the Harrison twins.

Specifically, Andrew and Aaron Harrison, who are twin brothers and just happen to be the best basketball recruits in the class of 2013 this side of Jabari Parker. As if that wasn’t enough to get college coaches salivating, they are reportedly a package deal.

Scout.com ranks Andrew as the top point guard and second best overall prospect and Aaron as the top shooting guard and third best overall prospect. Whichever program is able to land these two will immediately have a formidable backcourt.

Baylor, Maryland, Texas, Villanova and, in perhaps the biggest case of the rich potentially getting richer, Kentucky are listed as the five finalists for the twins' services.

But, for the time being, I am less interested in where Andrew and Aaron will be lacing it up next year and more intrigued by the type of players college basketball fans who don’t scour the Internet for high school highlights will see for the first time in 2013.

Let’s start with Andrew Harrison, the point guard. It’s basically an impossible task for high school defenders to keep him out of the lane thanks to his playmaking abilities off the dribble and overall size for the position. While he gets others involved as well, Andrew is in constant attack mode.

Jonathan Daniel/Getty Images

The only real issue with Andrew’s game is his suspect jump shot, whether it is from mid-range or behind the three-point line.

In large part due to his tremendous ability to beat defenders off the dribble and finish in the lane, Andrew Harrison has been compared to a similarly sized Tyreke Evans. While this parallel makes sense, I see someone else in Andrew—Derrick Rose.

Rose also has decent size for his point guard spot, but it is his playmaking abilities that make the comparison pertinent. When describing Rose’s game, it sounds incredibly similar to Andrew’s. Rose beats people off the dribble, finishes in the lane as well as anybody and occasionally struggles with his jump shot.

So, if Andrew’s NBA counterpart is Rose, what about twin brother Aaron?

Just like his brother, Aaron is an aggressive scorer who is in constant attack mode and rarely struggles to finish in the lane. However, unlike his brother, Aaron has the ability to be absolutely lethal from behind the three-point line.

Reportedly, Aaron occasionally has a problem with his emotions, but I would bet college coaches will be willing to overlook this detail when they see Aaron’s jumper and dribbling skills.

Thanks to this jumper and ability to carry a team on his back for stretches when he gets hot, Aaron has been compared to Joe Johnson. I happen to agree with that selection but, in the interest of originality, Aaron also reminds me of O.J. Mayo.

While Aaron’s ceiling may be higher if and when he reaches the NBA, both players are deceptively quick with the dribble and have that killer three-point ability. What’s more, the argument can be made that there is some concern with the emotional aspects of Aaron's game, but again, I feel as if this is something that will be sorted out when he receives college coaching.

So there you have it. I think that the Harrison twins have similar games to Derrick Rose and O.J. Mayo. Not a bad tandem.

What about you? Which NBA players are you reminded of when watching highlights of the Harrison brothers? And where do you think they eventually end up? Feel free to let me know in the comments section. 

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