Tour De France Prize Money 2014: Known Purse Payouts for Triple-Crown Race

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Tour De France Prize Money 2014: Known Purse Payouts for Triple-Crown Race
Bryn Lennon/Getty Images

The 2014 edition of the Tour de France begins in Leeds on Saturday, July 5, as British rider Chris Froome begins the defence of his title on home soil.

If he is successful in completing the three-week race in the quickest time of all the 198 riders taking part, he will land a €450,000 slice of the total prize purse of €2.2 million.

Well, that's not strictly true, as tradition dictates that the winner of the yellow jersey hands his Tour winnings back to the team as a thank you for all their hard work, but in theory, it's his.

Below we take a look at the further breakdown of the prize money, allocated to winners of the various stages and jerseys on offer at the most famous grand tour of the season.

Key Prize Money For Tour de France 2014
Category Winner Runnerup 3rd Place 4th 5th
Overall Standings €450,000 €200,000 €100,000 €70,000 €50,000
Stage Winners €8000 €4000 €2000 €1000 €500
Green Jersey €25,000 €15,000 €10,000 €5000 €2500
King of the Mountains €25,000 €15,000 €10,000 €5000 €2500
Super Combative rider €20,000 - - - -
Best Team €50,000 - - - -
Best Young Rider (White Jersey) €25,000 €15,000 €10,000 €5000 €2500

tsmplug.com

 

The Battle For Yellow

Laurent Cipriani/Associated Press

Of course, Froome will not have it all his own way in the General Classification battle for overall winner and will face stiff competition from Spain's Alberto Contador and Italy's Vincenzo Nibali.

Froome himself expects the biggest challenge to come from 31-year-old Saxo-Tinkoff team leader Contador, per the BBC, who won the Tour in 2007 and 2009 and finished fourth in 2013.

Last year Contador was struggling to get back to fitness but this time Saxo-Tinkoff team-mate Nicolas Roche, who will help pace his leader through the mountains, predicts an "epic" battle with Froome that will go right to the wire, per Velo News.

To have the sport's top two riders, at their very best, backed by two very good teams, I think it’s going to be a very exciting Tour.

Nibali, who didn't race the Tour last year after winning the Giro d'Italia, is seen as a rung below Contador and Froome in the battle for the yellow jersey, per Velo News, but he did claim his first win of 2014 on Saturday at the Italian national road race championship.

He will enter the Tour wearing the Italian tricolour jersey and than could be just the motivation he needs to make that final surge in quality.


The Race For Green

Laurent Rebours/Associated Press

Cannondale's Peter Sagan claimed the green jersey as leader of the points classification in 2013 and he is the favourite to do so again, per oddschecker.com, this year.

The points are won on the intermediate sprints and at the final-stage sprint, per Letour.com, and he will be pushed all the way by 2012 winner Mark Cavendish and Germany's Marcel Kittel.

And Kittel is hoping to get of to a flyer on Stage One from Leeds to Harrogate, which is expected to end in a bunch sprint:

On the flat stages, pure sprinters like Omega Pharma-Quick Step's Cavendish and Giant-Shimano's Kittle should have the edge on Sagan, but when the road rises, the Classic's specialist comes into his own.

The Slovakian has the ability to dominate on rolling territory, which comes as early as stage two in this year's Tour, and he used it to his advantage in 2013, claiming green on stage three and keeping it all the way to the finish in Paris.

 

King Of The Mountains

Christophe Ena/Associated Press

Pierre Rolland carries the hopes of the French nation after winning the polka-dot jersey in 2013 and this year only Contador is ahead of him the betting, per oddschecker.com.

But with the Spaniard's focus on the overall victory, Rolland's most likely challenger might come from within his own Europecar team in the shape of Thomas Voeckler, who loves to attack.

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