LeBron James: Chasing Jordan

Kyle Strittholt@Man0fSteel94Correspondent IFebruary 12, 2009

Everyone knows LeBron James, either from all the commercials he does, the posters he's on, or the fact that he is one of the best basketball players in the world. There’s no doubt when it comes to LeBron and his ability to put up big numbers in those 48 minutes on the court.  

A lot of times you hear that college basketball is more exhilarating than professional. In some cases, that's true. It's true that they get more regular TV time and everything, but I’m sure a lot of you will agree that watching LeBron is more exciting than just any other basketball player.

Without LeBron, the NBA would be more boring to watch because it's pretty much the same teams—the Celtics, Pistons, Lakers, Spurs, and Suns—moving towards the finals. Still, I'd take watching LeBron James over Duke vs. North Carolina any day of the year. He's so amazing and athletic that sometimes you sit there and think, "How in the world did he do that?"

LeBron is not the only one with the No. 23 that's done this before. So the question pops up: How close is LeBron James to being as good as Michael Jordan?

Since LeBron was in high school, the papers have been calling him "The One" or "King James." Is he on the way or already better than MJ? 

There is nothing you can say that hasn't been said about Jordan. You have the numbers, the championships, and the legend. He was so good that he came out of retirement over and over just to prove again that he was the best ever to step on a basketball court. He’s been the icon of basketball for over 20 years. Everyone wants to dunk, shoot, and be like Mike.  

So, the comparison of statistics for James and Jordan is where you have to look. They are both very similar in some categories, and each has a strength the other one doesn't.

Out of all the games played, LeBron has started all but two of the games he’s played in. Jordan didn’t start in 33 of the games he’s played in. LeBron stays on the court an average of two minutes longer than Jordan had to.

Their field goal percentages are almost identical, but Jordan has the slight edge over LeBron. Jordan was a lot better than LeBron is at free throw shots. LeBron beats Jordan in assists and rebounds, but Jordan wins in the scoring statistic.

OK, so some would say Jordan’s better when you look at him and how much he put on the score board. I mean, with years like 1986, in which Jordan averaged 37 points a game, you could very well get away with the argument that he is the better player.

I did go by career averages, but there is a statistic that stuck out at me. Out of Jordan’s long career, he had 51 double-doubles. He only had one triple-double in his whole career. Then you look at LeBron. He’s been in the league six years, compared to Jordan’s 15, and he already has 120 double-doubles, including 20 triple-doubles. 

That could get you thinking, who is the best complete player?

I think LeBron James is closer to Jordan than everyone thinks. He’s less selfish with the ball, and he makes sure his teammates are involved. I don’t think there is a player in the league today as good as LeBron.

Kobe Bryant scores major points, but he has been selfish with the ball too. I do not think LeBron is the best ever yet, but I think he will by the end of his career.

Best, or not though, these two are the definition of athletes. In the end of the argument, you can’t deny that LeBron James and Michael Jordan are the most fun basketball players to watch.

Related

    Jimmy Butler (Knee) Carried Off Court

    NBA logo
    NBA

    Jimmy Butler (Knee) Carried Off Court

    Adam Wells
    via Bleacher Report

    Jimmy Challenges LouWill to $100K 1-on-1 Game

    NBA logo
    NBA

    Jimmy Challenges LouWill to $100K 1-on-1 Game

    Maurice Moton
    via Bleacher Report

    Report: NBA Players Linked to CBB Scandal

    NBA logo
    NBA

    Report: NBA Players Linked to CBB Scandal

    Adam Wells
    via Bleacher Report

    KD: NCAA Players Should Be Paid

    NBA logo
    NBA

    KD: NCAA Players Should Be Paid

    Mike Chiari
    via Bleacher Report