Seattle Seahawks

Seattle Seahawks' 2014 Draft: The Good, the Bad and the Baffling

Tyson LanglandNFC West Lead WriterMay 11, 2014

Seattle Seahawks' 2014 Draft: The Good, the Bad and the Baffling

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    JACK DEMPSEY/Associated Press

    With the 2014 NFL draft in the books, we will be taking a look at all nine of the Seattle Seahawks draft picks. Some were good, some were bad and some were downright baffling. But that's the beauty of the NFL. General spectators, media members and NFL teams all have a different perspective on the draft.

    Let's take a look at all nine draftees and the respective categories they each fall into.

List of All 2014 Draft Selections

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    USA TODAY Sports

    Here's a complete look at who became a member of the Seahawks over the last three days: 

     

    Paul Richardson, WR (second round, No. 45 overall)

    Justin Britt, OT (second round, No. 64 overall)

    Cassius Marsh, DE (fourth round, No. 108 overall)

    Kevin Norwood, WR (fourth round, No. 123 overall)

    Kevin Pierre-Louis, OLB (fourth round, No. 132 overall)

    Jimmy Staten, DT (fifth round, No. 172 overall)

    Garrett Scott, OT (sixth round, No. 199 overall)

    Eric Pinkins, SS (sixth round, No. 208 overall)

    Kiero Small, FB (seventh round, No. 227 overall) 

The Good

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    Here's a look at the picks we liked:

     

    Paul Richardson, WR (second round, No. 45 overall)

    Some will hate this pick based on the fact Richardson's frame is so small, but the truth is he's a burner. He can take the top off a defense at a moment's notice and can take any pass to the house. Pete Carroll loves playmakers. 

    One should expect Richardson to fight for the No. 3 wide receiver job out of training camp.

     

    Justin Britt, OT (second round, No. 64 overall)

    When the Seahawks moved on from Breno Giacomini in the offseason, it became clear that offensive line coach Tom Cable wanted a fresh start at the right tackle position. So what did general manager John Schneider do? He gave Cable a new toy to work with at right tackle.

    Britt did have some injury issues at Missouri, but Seattle is hopeful he is over them. If he is, Britt should open the season as the team's starting right tackle. That's how polished of a product he is right now. 

     

    Cassius Marsh, DE (fourth round, No. 108 overall)

    Marsh's production wasn't where it needed to be in college, but the upside is definitely there. He can play multiple positions on the defensive line and even has the ability to drop back in coverage. It's safe to say Coach Carroll has had his eye on Marsh since USC recruited him coming out of high school.

     

    Kevin Norwood, WR (fourth round, No. 123 overall)

    I was surprised to see Seattle take another pass-catcher in Round 4, but Norwood must have been atop the Seahawks board. He's a tall, possession receiver who has reliable hands and is known as a good route-runner. 

    He will do a good job of creating separation and garnering yards after the catch in the Pacific Northwest.

     

    Kevin Pierre-Louis, OLB (fourth round, No. 132 overall)

    Pierre-Louis played outside linebacker at Boston College, yet it's safe to say he will play with his hand in the ground in Seattle because of his size. He has the speed and athleticism teams look for in an edge-rusher.

     

    Eric Pinkins, SS (sixth round, No. 208 overall)

    Even though Pinkins played strong safety at San Diego State, there's been some chatter that the Seahawks could move him to cornerback. This shouldn't shock anyone. Pinkins is 6'2" and has extremely long arms. In fact, his measurables are similar to those of current Seahawks cornerback Tharold Simon.

The Bad

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    Here's a look at the picks we didn't like:

     

    Jimmy Staten, DT (fifth round, No. 172 overall)

    Staten looks to be a Pete Carroll-esque guy. He's a big-bodied nose tackle who can move offensive linemen at the point of attack. The only problem is the Seahawks could have drafted him in the seventh round or snagged him as a priority free agent.

     

    Garrett Scott, OT (sixth round, No. 199 overall)

    Like Staten, Scott possesses great size and is versatile. But again, Seattle overdrafted the Marshall product. If the Seahawks wouldn't have drafted him in the sixth round, odds are he would have been an undrafted free agent.

The Baffling

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    Elaine Thompson/Associated Press

    And to wrap it up, here's a look at the picks we hated:

     

    Kiero Small, FB (seventh round, No. 227 overall)

    With Michael Robinson potentially in the fold this season and Derrick Coleman on the active roster, why in the world did the Seahawks need another fullback? To me, there's no way Small makes the 53-man roster.

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