Ex-Redskin Rock Cartwright Airs Dirty Laundry on The Radio

Use your ← → (arrow) keys to browse more stories
Ex-Redskin Rock Cartwright Airs Dirty Laundry on The Radio
Donald Miralle/Getty Images

After being released by the Washington Redskins yesterday evening, former seventh round draft pick Rock Cartwright made an appearance on 106.7 the Fan's evening drive time show, The LaVar Arrington Show with Chad Dukes.

For most of the interview Rock tried to stay respectful to the organization that drafted him and kept him around for eight seasons, even though speedier runners came through training camp year in and year out.

However, you could hear in his tone that he was quite upset. Like any of us being let go from our jobs, he had a right to be upset.

Even though Rock tried to stay on the classy side, hosts Arrington and Dukes kept pushing with questions to try and get Rock to say something derogatory about starting half-back Clinton Portis.

For those of you who don't know, during Super Bowl week, Clinton Portis said on the NFL Network that Arrington was jealous of him because when he came to town he was making more money than Arrington.

Of course Arrington shot back using his twitter account as well as his radio show. Since then, when referring to the Redskins on his show, Arrington has been very anti-Portis.

Even before that, Arrington's show and the station (the only sports talk station in D.C. not owned by Dan Snyder) has been very anti-Snyder and even sometimes anti-Redskins.

Eventually Cartwright cracked under the barrage of questions about Portis and began to complain about Portis' lack of practicing.

He went on to comment that he and second sting half-back Laddell Betts (also released yesterday) practiced their butts off and left everything out there, while Portis would complain about his legs being sore and not practice at all.

He also hinted at, but didn't go as far as to say, that he or Betts should have been out there starting because of their practice efforts.

We've all heard the old adage "You play how you practice," and there is truth to that. However, Portis, with his limited to no practice, was still a better option than Cartwright or Betts.

Cartwright also went on to say that the team is into selling jerseys (like that is a new concept for an sports franchise), and his name wasn't big enough.

Well no joke, but you get your name big enough by your efforts on the field. Sure he was a backup and had limited opportunities, but as he even said in the interview, "you have to make the most of your opportunities." 

Cartwright didn't. In fact, when both Portis and Betts went down with season-ending injuries, Cartwright's performance was so lackluster that the Redskins brought in Quinton Ganther from off the street to become the new starting back.

He did, however, come to Clinton's defense towards the end of the interview. 

When Dukes asked if Cartwright thought it was fair that he and Betts were being released and Portis was keeping his job, Cartwright responded:

"Well, you guys have to realize, CP's money has been guaranteed. So if they released him anyway, they're still gonna have to pay him. I mean, his money was guaranteed, so he's gonna be there regardless. If he's not there, he's still gonna get a paycheck. So it's kind of like a Catch-22; what can you do with him? He's a great running back, I'm not taking nothing from him. I think he still has something left in the tank."

It's not a resounding endorsement, but he's right.

For the past two weeks, Arrington and Dukes have been preaching for Portis to get released, but for some reason didn't understand that it wouldn't make any sense for the Redskins to do such a thing.

Cartwright, on the other hand, got it. 

He has hope for greener pastures elsewhere, and I wish him luck. But given that he's a 30-year-old seventh round back, I don't think he'll find a starting job anywhere. Maybe he'll catch on as a backup somewhere and maybe get a taste of a championship game.

After the Cartwright interview concluded, Arrington and Dukes welcomed on Antwaan Randel El.

Randel El, unlike Cartwright, didn't have a bitter tone in his voice. He seemed, in his words and tone, to be very grateful for the opportunity and the money the Redskins gave him.

Even when goaded by Arrington to trash the Redskins, Randel El didn't.

LaVar said, "I don't know how they ran things in Pittsburgh, but when I got to the Giants, I saw how a proper team was ran."

Here Randel El could have easily taken the bait and trashed Snyder, but he chose not to. Unlike Arrington, he took the high road.

Randel El said that the team ran smoother under Gibbs because Snyder trusted Gibbs with the team, and things were a bit rocky for the past season and a half because Snyder didn't have that same trust in Jim Zorn.

Randel El also commented that, had the offense ran smoother, you may have seen a different outcome this past off-season.

The rest of the (much shorter than Cartwright) interview went on that way. Randel El being thankful for the opportunity in D.C. and would not bash the team that he's spent the past four seasons with.

All in all, the 10 cuts yesterday were all necessary. With the exception of a few young underperforming players, all the cuts were players over 30 and making way too much money.

Despite what some cynics might say, these cuts to me represent a new order with this team. They unloaded some high priced and older backups to make way (hopefully) for some younger talent through the next couple of drafts.

Some of these cuts were a long time coming and might not have happened if (fromer GM) Vinny Cerrato and Snyder were still running the show. 

It would seem that new GM Bruce Allen isn't going to be playing favorites with top players or sentimental Redskins.

To him this isn't fantasy football; it's a business. As such, it would seem that he's going to put together the best team he can while not making some of the mistakes this franchise has made in the past 10 years.

Load More Stories
Washington Redskins

Subscribe Now

We will never share your email address

Thanks for signing up.