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NCAA Announces College World Series Will Sell Alcohol During Games

Vanderbilt and Virginia lineup before Game 3 of the best-of-three NCAA baseball College World Series finals at TD Ameritrade Park in Omaha, Neb., Wednesday, June 24, 2015. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik)
Nati Harnik/Associated Press
Joseph ZuckerFeatured Columnist IVDecember 30, 2016

The NCAA announced Wednesday a one-year pilot program that will allow beer and wine to be sold to the general public at the College World Series and Women's College World Series.

According to Michelle Brutlag Hosick of NCAA.com, the new rules will apply only to the respective championships. Fans attending CWS games at TD Ameritrade Park in Omaha, Nebraska, or WCWS games at the ASA Hall of Fame Stadium in Oklahoma City will be able to purchase alcohol at specific concession stands throughout the venues.

The idea behind the change is that if fans are able to drink wine or beer inside the stadium for the CWS or WCWS championships, it could decrease the likelihood said fans drink heavily before the game. D1Baseball.com's Kendall Rogers also highlighted another piece of information playing into the NCAA's decision:   

The College World Series started selling alcohol to fans in premium seats starting in 2013.

Should the new experiment be a success, there's no reason the NCAA shouldn't continue it for another season and possibly even incrementally expand it with each passing year.

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