5 Slammy Awards Categories to Bring Back

Anthony MangoFeatured ColumnistDecember 9, 2013

5 Slammy Awards Categories to Bring Back

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    (photo courtesy of WWE.com)

    At tonight's 2013 Slammy Awards, 12 different categories will celebrate the best WWE had to offer this year.

    However, there are several other categories from past editions of the Slammy Awards that should have been added to that list.

    WWE has opted to include several joke awards that are there strictly to appeal to their own sense of humor and in the process, have neglected five that could serve a greater purpose.

    These awards may be less fun than the comedic ones, but they are more legitimate topics to talk about if you are building an episode around an awards ceremony.

    Whether they would be beneficial to the performers directly or just introduce more potential for storylines, let's take a look at what we're missing out on this year and won't be seeing on tonight's special edition of Raw.

1. Manager of the Year

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    (photo courtesy of WWE.com)

    WWE invests quite a bit of time in their supporting characters, but they're noticeably absent from the Slammy Awards unless they tie directly into an odd category.

    The only place you're likely to see someone like Brad Maddox or Vickie Guerrero is in something like the LOL Moment of the Year category doing something foolish.

    But if so much of the year has revolved around the idea of Paul Heyman being a manager that people want to be associated with, where does that get mentioned at the Slammy Awards?

    It would make sense that if being in the presence of Heyman and working with him is incredibly important, giving Heyman even more credibility by awarding him Manager of the Year further reiterates his value.

    Why should the managers and valets go unnoticed if so many segments on Raw and SmackDown are dedicated to those characters dictating matches and setting up feuds?

2. Tag Team of the Year

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    (photo courtesy of WWE.com)

    If WWE is serious about strengthening the tag team division, it certainly wouldn't hurt to have a Slammy dedicated entirely to showcasing the teams.

    Sometimes, as shown with stables like The Shield, the wrestlers inside of tag teams can be extremely important to the infrastructure of the roster.

    However, since they all share the spotlight with one another, it's unlikely that any one member would stand out enough to be given the Superstar of the Year award.

    As such, a Tag Team of the Year award allows not only more people to shine, but it also calls attention to the division as a whole.

    It's different enough to have its own distinction and the only downside would be that you can't pick more than one winning team, as there have been many that were very entertaining this year.

3. Feat of Strength of the Year

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    (photo courtesy of WWE.com)

    If WWE thinks it serves a purpose to have a Beard of the Year category and an award for the best insult, bringing back the Feat of Strength of the Year award should be a no-brainer.

    In particular, Antonio Cesaro comes to mind as someone that has done nothing worthy of any other awards the entire year, but would excel in something like this.

    The WWE Universe loves Cesaro's swing and clearly, WWE management does as well, so why not give it the recognition it deserves for being something entertaining?

    It never hurts to remind the audience how strong a wrestler is, as they're supposed to be larger than life characters that we are astounded by.

    Plus, it gives a character like Cesaro grounds to boast even more about his strength if he wins an award based on it, as opposed to merely being a braggart on his own accord.

4. Best Finisher of the Year

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    Is Roman Reigns' spear the best finisher of the year?
    Is Roman Reigns' spear the best finisher of the year?(photo courtesy of WWE.com)

    Similar to the Feat of Strength of the Year award, indicating the most vicious finishing maneuver only adds more stock to what already should be impressive in the eyes of the fans.

    An entire segment and award that illustrates just how effective and brutal a wrestler's signature move is can be exactly the reason why the audience buys into it being worthy of the end of a match.

    If Randy Orton hits an RKO, it's viewed as an acceptable move to finish a match with due to how WWE has portrayed it as being very hurtful, but people would be confused if a match were to end on a hip toss.

    That is because it isn't spoken of in the same regard and it doesn't have any legitimacy to back it up as a finishing maneuver.

    So what better way to bump up the status of a wrestler's finisher than to give it an award and in turn, giving the fans that much more to believe in?

5. Upset of the Year

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    (photo courtesy of WWE.com)

    What is so great about the Upset of the Year category is that it has potential to be used both for laughs and in a serious way.

    Daniel Bryan's defeat of John Cena at SummerSlam was built entirely around the idea of a theoretical upset and would probably be the most serious candidate for this year.

    However, upsets can happen all the time. It doesn't need to be the biggest story at the time to be functional in this category.

    WWE could use this category to remind fans of any notable surprise victory that a babyface (or heel, for that matter) had over the past year, whether it was in a main event or just between midcarders on Raw.

    This is a good way to reignite someone's push if things went astray over the previous few months since something like that happened.

    It can also be a joke if WWE wants to shed some light on a celebrity getting a win over a wrestler or a comedic superstar that isn't normally looked at as a threat one-upping someone above their supposed skill level, such as the classic win that The 1-2-3 Kid's victory over Razor Ramon in 1993.

     

    Upset of the Year fits in perfectly with other awards like the Extreme Moment of the Year and This is Awesome Moment of the Year, so it should be on this list alongside them.

    Are there any other former categories that you would like to see WWE bring back for future Slammy Awards presentations? Leave a comment and tell us!

    Anthony Mango is the owner-operator of the wrestling website Smark Out Moment as well as the host of its podcast show Smack Talk on YouTube, iTunes and Stitcher. You can follow him on Facebook and elsewhere for more.