In Other News...MLB's Next Cities: Where Should Baseball Go Next?

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In Other News...MLB's Next Cities:  Where Should Baseball Go Next?
(Photo by Steve Snowden/Getty Images)

As cities get bigger and as the fan base grows, baseball will need to expand.  But where?

To answer that question, I made a "playoff" in between cities that could get a new team.  The bracket will go from 14 teams, to seven, to three, to the most likely to get a new team.  Here's the list:

Along with the team is commentary and likeliness/seed on a scale of 1-10.

Albuquerque, New Mexico:  (9)

        New Mexico could use a team, sure, but, this city is bigger than people sometimes think.  And, it's location is superb:  Right smack dab in the middle of New Mexico.  Very likely to get a team.

Charlotte, North Carolina:  (10)

        They have shown great support with a football team, and I think they would very much accept a baseball team.  The city is a pretty highly populated city, and the area is well put in between the two closest teams, (Atlanta, D.C.)  Expect a team here soon.

Columbus, Ohio:  (5)

        Why such a low rating for the 15th most populous city at the 2000 census?  Too close to four teams:  Cincinnati, Detroit, Pittsburg, and Cleveland.  A team here would be unlikely, due to it's proximity to those four cities.

El Paso, Texas:  (4)

       A populated town on the south east end of Texas, I don't think that there would be much fan support for a professional team there.  Even though it is relatively far from any team, I doubt a team will ever be there.

Indianapolis, Indiana:  (7)

      This city should move on to the next round, but no further.  They have shown that professional sports could succeed there, but I don't think baseball will.  And, they are close to other baseball cities. 

Jacksonville, Florida:  (5)

      A large city, I don't think Florida will be awarded a third team after the other team's lack of success.  If baseball does choose to again expand to Florida, expect them in Jacksonville over Tallahassee.

Las Vegas, Nevada:  (1)

       Cross out Las Vegas, and change it to Blue Diamond, and the rating skyrockets to a Seven.  Why a One in Vegas?  One word: gambling.  Baseball stays away from gambling.  Outside of Vegas, (where gambling's illegal,) there is a suburb named "Blue Diamond," and it actually has a pretty high population.  Then, Vegas baseball fans could get there baseball (boy, Richard Marsh will be happy!) and baseball can stray from gambling.

Memphis/Nashville, Tennessee:  (More likely than not, Memphis, it has more money.)  (8)

      Tennessee should expect a baseball team at some point, when MLB discovers it should move also towards our countries mid section.

New Orleans, Louisiana:  (6)

       As New Orleans has proved, it can handle a professional team, with both the Hornets and Saints doing okay.  But, I think baseball might be reluctant to build one of their spiffy new parks in Hurricane-and-flood-prone New Orleans. 

Going there would be a gamble, and as I said, Baseball strays from gambling.

Oklahoma City, Oklahoma:  (8)

     After unfairly winning their first sports team, OKC proved they were for real on the sports scene.  I think they could do it, and that part of the country has few teams, and could really use one.

 

As cities get bigger and as the fan base grows, baseball will need to expand.  But where?

To answer that question, I made a "playoff" in between cities that could get a new team.  The bracket will go from 14 teams, to seven, to three, to the most likely to get a new team.  Here's the list:

Along with the team is commentary and likeliness/seed on a scale of 1-10.

Albuquerque, New Mexico:  (9)

        New Mexico could use a team, sure, but, this city is bigger than people sometimes think.  And, it's location is superb:  Right smack dab in the middle of New Mexico.  Very likely to get a team.

Charlotte, North Carolina:  (10)

        They have shown great support with a football team, and I think they would very much accept a baseball team.  The city is a pretty highly populated city, and the area is well put in between the two closest teams, (Atlanta, D.C.)  Expect a team here soon.

Columbus, Ohio:  (5)

        Why such a low rating for the 15th most populous city at the 2000 census?  Too close to four teams:  Cincinnati, Detroit, Pittsburg, and Cleveland.  A team here would be unlikely, due to it's proximity to those four cities.

El Paso, Texas:  (4)

       A populated town on the south east end of Texas, I don't think that there would be much fan support for a professional team there.  Even though it is relatively far from any team, I doubt a team will ever be there.

Indianapolis, Indiana:  (7)

      This city should move on to the next round, but no further.  They have shown that professional sports could succeed there, but I don't think baseball will.  And, they are close to other baseball cities. 

Jacksonville, Florida:  (5)

      A large city, I don't think Florida will be awarded a third team after the other team's lack of success.  If baseball does choose to again expand to Florida, expect them in Jacksonville over Tallahassee.

Las Vegas, Nevada:  (1)

       Cross out Las Vegas, and change it to Blue Diamond, and the rating skyrockets to a Seven.  Why a One in Vegas?  One word: gambling.  Baseball stays away from gambling.  Outside of Vegas, (where gambling's illegal,) there is a suburb named "Blue Diamond," and it actually has a pretty high population.  Then, Vegas baseball fans could get there baseball (boy, Richard Marsh will be happy!) and baseball can stray from gambling.

Memphis/Nashville, Tennessee:  (More likely than not, Memphis, it has more money.)  (8)

      Tennessee should expect a baseball team at some point, when MLB discovers it should move also towards our countries' mid section.

New Orleans, Louisiana:  (6)

       As New Orleans has proved, it can handle a professional team, with both the Hornets and Saints doing okay.  But, I think baseball might be reluctant to build one of their spiffy new parks in Hurricane-and-flood-prone New Orleans. 

Going there would be a gamble, and as I said, Baseball strays from gambling.

Oklahoma City, Oklahoma:  (8)

     After unfairly winning their first sports team, OKC proved they were for real on the sports scene.  I think they could do it, and that part of the country has few teams, and could really use one.

Omaha, Nebraska:  (2)

     Won't happen, but it would be cool!

Portland, Oregon:  (9)

       A very likely situation, Portland would love its new team, and people from Salem and Vancouver, WA, would come to watch.

A team in Portland could do really well.

San Antonio, Texas:  (4)

      I don't think baseball is too interested in going here.  It is a little out of the way, and they might not love baseball. 

San Juan, Puerto Rico:  (9)

       Why not go off the U.S.'s mainland?

Puerto Ricans love their B ball and would cherish a team.  The only problem would be getting planes out there:  Imagine going from Seattle to San Juan?

Round Two:

 

 

 

 

 

 

Memphis/Nashville, Tennessee: (8)

Blue Diamond:  (7)

 

Oklahoma City, Oklahoma:  (8)

 

 

Portland, Oregon:  (9)

 

 

 

 

 

San Juan, Porto Rico:  (9)

Semi-Finals  (3) 

Charlotte, North Carolina:  (10)

Portland, Oregon:  (9)

San Juan, Porto Rico:  (9)

Most Likely to get a new team:

San Juan!

Yes, over the others.  This would get huge fan support, and there is already a stadium.

Bonus:

Anchorage and Honolulu?

Alaska:

Home Run Derby

Honolulu:

All-Star Game

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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