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Robinson Cano and the 60 Worst Postseason Performances of All Time

Phil WatsonCorrespondent IJanuary 9, 2017

Robinson Cano and the 60 Worst Postseason Performances of All Time

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    Robinson Cano of the New York Yankees experienced one of the worst postseasons ever, particularly for a player with his credentials.

    Cano is a four-time All-Star and a career .308 hitter through his first eight seasons in the major leagues. In 2012, Cano posted a triple-slash line of .313/.379/.550 with a career-high 33 home runs and 94 RBI. His on-base and slugging percentages were also career bests.

    But in the playoffs, Cano set a postseason record with 29 straight hitless at-bats on his way to a 3-for-40 (.075) showing in the Yankees’ nine postseason games in 2012. He did have four RBI in the Division Series five-game win over the Baltimore Orioles despite going 2-for-22. But in the American League Championship Series against the Detroit Tigers, Cano mustered just one hit in 18 at-bats as New York was swept.

    Here are 60 of the worst postseason hitting performances of all-time, broken into the three era of posts-season play (the one-round era from 1903-1968, the two-round era from 1969-1980 and 1982-1993, and the three-round era of 1981 and 1995-2012).

Single-Series Era: Dal Maxvill, 1968 St. Louis Cardinals (0-for-22)

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    Dal Maxvill was never one to be confused with an offensive juggernaut. In 14 seasons, Maxvill was just a .217 lifetime hitter.

    But he actually had his best offensive season while playing shortstop for the 1968 National League champion St. Louis Cardinals, hitting a career-high .253 in 516 plate appearances. He had one homer and 24 RBI in 151 games.

    In the World Series loss to the Detroit Tigers, however, he took an 0-for-22 in the seven-game series. He scored one run and did get on base with three walks.

    Maxvill holds the all-time single postseason record for most at-bats without recording a hit.

Billy Sullivan, 1906 Chicago White Sox (0-for-21)

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    Billy Sullivan backstopped the Chicago White Sox to a World Series title despite going hitless in six games in the World Series win over the Chicago Cubs.

    Sullivan hit just .214 in 432 plate appearances for the White Sox in 1906, a team dubbed the “Hitless Wonders” by the Chicago press for its offensive ineptitude. Chicago won the American League pennant despite finishing last in the league with a .230 team batting average.  Sullivan, a lifetime .213 hitter in 16 seasons, had two homers and 33 RBIs while stealing 10 bases.

    In the World Series, Sullivan was 0-for-21. He struck out nine times and never reached base, although he did contribute a sacrifice bunt in the White Sox’ 3-0 win in Game 3.

Gil Hodges, 1952 Brooklyn Dodgers (0-for-21)

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    Gil Hodges was an eight-time All-Star for the Dodgers in both Brooklyn and Los Angeles. He slugged 370 home runs and drove in 1,274 runs over an 18-year career and was a lifetime .273 hitter.

    But in the 1952 World Series against the New York Yankees, Hodges didn’t play like an All-Star. He was 0-for-21 in the series with five walks (one intentional) and six strikeouts in the seven-game loss. Hodges scored a run, drove one in and hit into two double plays in the series.

    Hodges was an eight-time All-Star in his 18-year career. He hit 370 home runs and drove in 1,274 runs in 2,071 career games. He also managed the New York Mets to a World Series title in 1969.

Jim Bottomley, 1930 St. Louis Cardinals (1-for-22)

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    Jim Bottomley was inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1974, 37 years after his last game and 15 years after his death in 1959.

    In the 1930 World Series against the Philadelphia Athletics, however, Bottomley bottomed out. He was 1-for-22 in the six-game loss to the Athletics. The one hit was a double in the Cardinals’ 5-0 win in Game 3. Bottomley did score a run in the series, walked twice and struck out nine times from the cleanup spot in the order.

    Bottomley was a lifetime .310 hitter in 16 seasons and hit 219 home runs with 1,422 RBIs. In 1930, Bottomley hit .304 with 15 homers and 97 RBIs for St. Louis.

Frankie Crosetti, 1937 New York Yankees (1-for-21)

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    Frankie Crosetti didn’t have a great season for the New York Yankees in 1937. He hit just .234, led the league with 105 strikeouts while scoring 127 runs. He hit 11 homers and drove in 49 runs in 149 games, mostly out of the leadoff spot.

    In the Yankees’ five-game victory over the New York Giants in the World Series, Crosetti wasn’t much of an offensive factor. He was 1-for-21 with two runs scored and three walks. He also grounded into a double play.

    Crosetti was a two-time All-Star who hit .245 in 17 seasons. He hit 98 home runs, scored 1,006 runs and stole 113 bases.

Tony Kubek, 1958 New York Yankees (1-for-21)

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    Tony Kubek was an All-Star in 1958, one year removed from a Rookie of the Year award in 1957. He moved into the lineup as the New York Yankees’ regular shortstop in 1958, hitting .265. He finished the year with two homers, 48 RBI and 66 runs scored in 597 plate appearances.

    The Yankees reclaimed the championship by beating the Milwaukee Braves in seven games in the World Series, but Kubek didn’t contribute much. He was 1-for-21 with an RBI on a sacrifice fly and a walk (intentional) in seven games. He also struck out seven times. The RBI was significant as he gave New York a 2-1 lead it wouldn’t relinquish in Game 7.

    Kubek hit .266 in nine seasons with 57 homers and 373 RBI and was a four-time All-Star.

Burgess Whitehead, 1936 New York Giants (1-for-21)

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    The New York Giants had acquired Burgess Whitehead (left) from the St. Louis Cardinals the previous winter and installed him at second base. Whitehead went on to hit .278 and score 99 runs with 14 stolen bases for the Giants.

    In the World Series against the New York Yankees, Whitehead struggled. He was 1-for-21 with a run scored and a walk. He struck out three times and was thrown out on his only stolen base attempt.

    Whitehead was twice an All-Star in nine seasons. He hit .266 and scored 415 runs in 924 games.

Marv Owen, 1935 Detroit Tigers (1-for-20)

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    Marv Owen played third base for the Detroit Tigers’ back-to-back American League pennant winners in 1934 and 1935. In 1935, Owen hit .263 with 71 RBI in 544 plate appearances for the Tigers.

    While the Tigers were winning their first championship by beating the Chicago Cubs in six games, Owen was quiet at the plate. He was just 1-for-20 with a pair of walks (one intentional) and was hit by a pitch. He also had a sacrifice bunt and an RBI and scored two runs.

    In nine big-league seasons, Owen was a .275 hitter with 497 RBI and just 283 strikeouts in 4,224 plate appearances.

Sandy Amoros, 1956 Brooklyn Dodgers (1-for-19)

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    Sandy Amoros was best known for a catch in the 1955 World Series that helped preserve a 2-0 win in Game 7 for Brooklyn’s only championship. In 1956, Amoros was a part-time outfielder for the Dodgers. He hit .260 with career highs 16 homers and 58 RBI in 362 plate appearances. He split time in left field with utility man Jim Gilliam for much of the season.

    Amoros played in six of the seven games in the World Series against the New York Yankees but was just 1-for-19. He had two walks and four strikeouts and also scored a run and drove one in. But the Dodgers’ hopes of a dynasty were thwarted as the Yankee took back the title.

    For his career, Amoros hit .255 with 43 homers in 1,561 plate appearances.

Nemo Leibold, 1919 Chicago White Sox (1-for-18)

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    Nemo Leibold wasn’t one of the eight members of the 1919 Chicago White Sox to be banned for life for the game-fixing scandal. He just played like it. Leibold was the regular right fielder for the White Sox in 1919, hitting .302 with 26 RBI and 17 steals. He scored 81 runs on the year as Chicago won the American League pennant for the second time in three seasons.

    In the controversial World Series loss to the Cincinnati Reds, Leibold struggled and was eventually benched. He played five of the eight games in the series and was just 1-for-18 with a stolen base and a pair of walks. He struck out three times.

    In 13 years for four American League teams, Leibold hit .266 in 4,870 plate appearances. He stole 136 bases and scored 638 runs while hitting just three homers—all after the dead-ball era ended after the 1919 season.

Hank Bauer, 1952 New York Yankees (1-for-18)

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    Hank Bauer made the first of his three All-Star appearances in 1952 as the New York Yankees’ right fielder. He hit .293 with 17 homers and 74 RBI in a career-high 615 plate appearances and scored 86 runs.

    But he wasn’t much of a factor as the Yankees beat the Brooklyn Dodgers in seven games to win the World Series. Bauer was 1-for-18 with four walks and an RBI in the series. He scored twice, was hit by a pitch and laid down a sacrifice bunt.

    Bauer was a lifetime .277 hitter in 14 seasons but lost four seasons (1942-45) to World War II. He slugged 164 homers and drove in 703 runs while scoring 833 runs. He later managed the Baltimore Orioles to their first championship in 1966.

Marv Owen, 1934 Detroit Tigers (2-for-29)

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    Marv Owen makes his second appearances on this list for his effort in his first World Series appearance.

    Owen hit a career-high .317 in 1934 while helping the Detroit Tigers to their first pennant in 25 years. He played in all 154 games and drove in 96 runs while scoring 79. He hit 34 doubles, nine triples and eight homers.

    In the World Series against the St. Louis Cardinals, though, Owen was just 2-for-29 in the seven games. He had an RBI and was hit by a pitch while striking out five times. In two World Series appearances, Owen hit just .061 in 49 at-bats.

Travis Jackson, 1924 New York Giants (2-for-27)

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    Travis Jackson was inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1982 after a 15-year career with the New York Giants that ended in 1936. In 1924, Jackson was the Giants’ shortstop at age 20 and hit .302 with 11 homers and 76 RBI in 633 plate appearances. He also scored 81 runs and hit eight triples.

    In the World Series against the Washington Senators, the young Jackson never got it going. He was 2-for-27 with an RBI in New York’s seven-game loss. He scored three runs, drove in one, walked and stole a base. He also bounced into two double plays, had a sacrifice fly and a sacrifice bunt.

    Jackson hit .291 for his career with 135 homers and 929 RBI in 6,680 plate appearances. He also hit 86 triples and was an All-Star in 1934.

Swede Risberg, 1919 Chicago White Sox (2-for-25)

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    Swede Risberg (center) was one of eight members of the 1919 Chicago White Sox to receive a lifetime ban for his involvement with fixing the World Series that season.

    Risberg, the White Sox’ shortstop, hit .256 during the season and stole 19 bases. He scored 48 runs and drove in 38 in 463 plate appearances. In the World Series, however, Risberg was 2-for-25 with a triple as the White Sox lost in eight games to the Cincinnati Reds. He scored three runs, drew five walks and struck out three times.

    Risberg’s career lasted just four seasons before he was banned at the age of 25. He hit .243 in 1,836 plate appearances and stole 52 bases in 476 games.

Dave Bancroft, 1923 New York Giants (2-for-24)

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    Dave Bancroft  (right) was inducted to the Hall of Fame in 1971 following a 16-year career that ended in 1930. In 1923, Bancroft played shortstop for the New York Giants, splitting time with rookie Travis Jackson. In 107 games, Bancroft hit .304 with 80 runs in 513 plate appearances. He belted 33 doubles and drove in 31 runs.

    The Giants won their third straight National League pennant in 1923, but lost in the World Series to the New York Yankees. The six-game defeat came after beating the Yankees in 1921 and 1922. For the series, Bancroft was just 2-for-24 with an RBI. He walked once, scored a run and struck out twice.

    Bancroft was a lifetime .279 hitter with 2,004 hits in 8,248 plate appearances. He stole 145 bases in his career but never again tasted postseason play after the 1923 campaign. After the season, he was traded to the Boston Braves to open up a lineup spot for Jackson.

Jim Gilliam, 1956 Brooklyn Dodgers (2-for-24)

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    Jim Gilliam was the Brooklyn Dodgers’ everyday utility man in 1956. He started 98 games at second base and 49 more in left field while hitting a career-high .300 in 701 plate appearances. Gilliam scored 102 runs and stole 21 bases and made the first of his two All-Star appearances.

    But in the World Series, Gilliam got on base not via the hit but with seven walks. Gilliam was 2-for-24 in the seven-game loss to the New York Yankees. He scored two runs, drove in two and stole one base in two attempts.

    Gilliam was the 1953 Rookie of the Year in the National League. In 14 years with the Dodgers in Brooklyn and Los Angeles, Gilliam hit .265 in 8,322 plate appearances. He also scored 1,163 runs and stole 203 bases while drawing 1,036 walks.

Bill Freehan, 1968 Detroit Tigers (2-for-24)

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    Bill Freehan was an All-Star in 1968 for the Detroit Tigers thanks to his defensive work behind the plate and his 25 home runs at it. He hit .263 in 635 plate appearances and drove in 84 runs and captured a Gold Glove.

    In the World Series against the St. Louis Cardinals, Freehan was held to just two RBI. He was 2-for-24 in seven games with a double and four walks. The Tigers did win their first title since 1935 by beating the Cardinals in Game 7.

    Freehan made 11 All-Star teams and won five Gold Gloves in his 15 years with the Tigers. He hit .262 for his career with 200 homers and 758 RBI in 6,900 plate appearances.

Taylor Douthit, 1930 St. Louis Cardinals (2-for-24)

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    Taylor Douthit (far left) batted .303 for the St. Louis Cardinals on their way to the 1930 National League crown. He scored 109 runs, had 201 hits, 41 doubles, 10 triples and 93 RBI in 748 plate appearances.

    In the World Series against the Philadelphia Athletics, Douthit was held in check. He was just 2-for-24 with a homer and two RBI as the Cardinals lost in six games.

    Douthit played 11 seasons and was a .291 hitter in 4,729 plate appearances.

Bucky Harris, 1925 Washington Senators (2-for-23)

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    Bucky Harris played second base for the Washington Senators in 1925. But he was also the team’s manager, in his second year at the helm at the tender age of 28. Harris hit .287 with 66 RBI and 91 runs scored in 144 games for the defending champions.

    Facing the Pittsburgh Pirates in the World Series, Harris was just 2-for-23 with a walk and two runs scored. The Pirates won the Series in seven games as Harris struck out three times and laid down four sacrifices.

    Harris played 12 seasons and was a .274 hitter with 167 stolen bases in 5,559 plate appearances. Harris would make the Hall of Fame as a manager, though. He managed for 29 seasons and won 2,158 games, including World Series titles with the Senators in 1924 and New York Yankees in 1947.

Vada Pinson, 1961 Cincinnati Reds (2-for-22)

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    Vada Pinson led the National League with 208 hits in 1961 as the Cincinnati Reds won their first pennant in 21 years. He stole 23 bases, scored 101 runs, belted 16 home runs and drove in 87 runs for the Reds.

    The New York Yankees took the World Series in five games, thanks in part to being able to control Pinson at the top of the Cincinnati order. Pinson was 2-for-22 with a double in the series and only reached base twice.

    Pinson made four All-Star teams in his first two seasons, 1959 and 1960. He played 18 years in all and batted .286 with 2,757 hits and 1,366 runs scored. He stole 305 bases, hit 256 homers and drove in 1,170 runs

Two-Series Era: Mike Bordick, 1992 Oakland Athletics (1-for-19)

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    Mike Bordick was in his first full season as the starting shortstop for the Oakland Athletics in 1992 and hit a career-best .300 in 572 plate appearances. He hit three homers and drove in 48 runs.

    But in the American League Championship Series against the Toronto Blue Jays, Bordick’s bat evaporated. He was 1-for-19 with a run scored and a walk in six games. Toronto won the series 4-2 and would go on to beat the Atlanta Braves for the championship. In the series, Bordick stole a base and struck out twice.

    Bordick was an All-Star in 2000 and finished his 14-year career with 1,500 hits and a .260 lifetime average. He hit 91 home runs and had 626 RBIs in 1,720 games.

Bobby Brown, 1984 San Diego Padres (1-for-19)

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    Bobby Brown was a fourth outfielder for the San Diego Padres in 1984. He made only 35 starts in the regular season and hit .251 in 187 at-bats with three homers, 29 RBIs and 16 stolen bases.

    But when center fielder Kevin McReynolds went down with an injury in the National League Championship Series against the Chicago Cubs, Brown was pressed into service. He was 0-for-4 with a run scored and a stolen base against the Cubs. Against the Detroit Tigers in the World Series, Brown was just 1-for-15 with two RBIs. He also scored a run.

    Brown played seven years but was a regular for just one of them, with the New York Yankees in 1980. For his career, he hit .245 in 502 games with 26 homers and 130 RBIs. He also had 110 stolen bases.

Bill North, 1974 Oakland Athletics (2-for-33)

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    Bill North was the speedy leadoff hitter and center fielder for the two-time defending champion Oakland Athletics in 1974. He led the American League with 54 stolen bases and scored 79 runs while hitting .260 in 149 games.

    But North endured a brutal postseason. In the American League Championship Series against the Baltimore Orioles, North was 1-for-16 with two walks and scored three runs. His lone hit was a double but Oakland won in four games. It didn’t get better against the Los Angeles Dodgers in the World Series. North was 1-for-17 in the five-game set, with three runs, two walks and a stolen base. Despite North’s struggles, the Athletics won their third straight title.

    North lasted 11 years and was a career .261 hitter with 395 stolen bases in 1,169 career games. He also led the AL in steals with 75 in 1976.

Dick Green, 1973 Oakland Athletics (2-for-29)

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    Dick Green made 122 starts at second base for the Oakland Athletics in 1973. He hit .262 with three homers and 42 RBI in 332 at-bats.

    In the postseason, Green was 1-for-13 in the American League Championship Series against the Baltimore Orioles. In the five-game affair, he had a double and an RBI. Against the New York Mets in the World Series, Green was 1-for-16 with a walk. The Athletics needed seven games but won the title for the second straight year. Green had 10 strikeouts in 29 postseason at-bats.

    Green played 12 years for the Athletics in Kansas City and Oakland and was a career .240 hitter with 80 homers and 422 RBIs.

Andy Van Slyke, 1985 St. Louis Cardinals (2-for-22)

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    Andy Van Slyke started 104 games in right field for the St. Louis Cardinals in 1985. In 424 at-bats, he hit .259 with 13 home runs and 55 RBIs. He also stole 34 bases and scored 61 runs.

    In the National League Championship Series against the Los Angeles Dodgers, Van Slyke played in five of the six games and was 1-for-11. He scored a run and drove in one as well as the Cardinals advanced. In the World Series against the Kansas City Royals, Van Slyke was 1-for-11 in six games. He struck out five times and the Royals beat the Cardinals in seven games.

    Van Slyke would play in three All-Star Games in his 13-year career. He retired with a .274 average and 164 home runs in 1,658 games. He stole 245 bases and scored 835 runs, as well.

Dick Green, 1974 Oakland Athletics (2-for-22)

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    Dick Green made this list two years in a row, also appearing for his tepid offensive performance in the 1973 postseason.

    1974 marked the final year of Green’s career. As a part-time player, he hit .213 in 287 at-bats with two homers and 22 RBI.

    But because of his dependable glove, he started all four games of the American League Championship Series against the Baltimore Orioles. He was 2-for-9 in the series with a pair of walks. In the World Series against the Los Angeles Dodgers, Green was 0-for-13 with a walk, an RBI and a run scored. The Athletics won in five games for their third straight championship.

Tony Perez, 1973 Cincinnati Reds (2-for-22)

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    Tony Perez was a key cog in Cincinnati’s Big Red Machine of the 1970s. In 1973, Perez hit .317 with 27 home runs and 101 RBIs in 151 games.

    But against the New York Mets in the National League Championship Series, Perez went cold. He was 2-for-22 with a homer and two RBIs. The Reds were upset by the Mets in five games.

    Perez was inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1986 after a 23-year career. He hit 379 home runs, drove in 1,652 runs and was a lifetime .279 hitter. He finished his career with 1,272 runs scored and 2,732 hits.

Mike Epstein, 1972 Oakland Athletics (3-for-32)

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    Mike Epstein provided some of the pop in the middle of the Oakland Athletics’ order in 1972. In 138 games, Epstein belted 26 home runs and drove in 70 runs. He hit .270 for the year and scored 63 runs.

    In the American League Championship Series against the Detroit Tigers, Epstein was 3-for-16 with a homer. The A’s escaped Detroit in five games and reached the franchise’s first World Series in 41 years. Epstein was eventually benched in the World Series after going 0-for-16. He did walk five times and scored a run.

    Epstein ended his nine-year career with a .244 average and 130 home runs.

Willie Randolph, 1976 New York Yankees (3-for-31)

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    Rookie Willie Randolph came over in a trade from the Pittsburgh Pirates over the winter and took over at second base for the New York Yankees. He hit .267 as a rookie and stole 37 bases while scoring 59 runs. He was primarily in the lower end of the batting order for the Yankees, who reached the postseason for the first time in 12 years.

    It was a tough postseason for the 21-year-old. Randolph was 2-for-17 with an RBI and a stolen base in the American League Championship Series. The Yankees beat the Kansas City Royals in five games to reach the World Series. The Cincinnati Reds continued Randolph’s struggles. He was 1-for-14 against the Reds, who swept the Yankees in four straight.

    Randolph was a six-time All-Star in his 18 seasons. He hit .276 lifetime with 2,210 hits and 271 stolen bases in 2,202 games. He also scored 1,239 runs and coaxed 1,243 walks to just 675 strikeouts.

Kelly Gruber, 1992 Toronto Blue Jays (4-for-41)

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    Kelly Gruber hadn’t enjoyed a great season in 1992 for the Toronto Blue Jays. Limited to 120 games by nagging injuries, Gruber hit .229 with 11 homers and 43 RBIs.

    The cold stretch extended to October. Against the Oakland Athletics in the American League Championship Series, Gruber was 2-for-22 with a homer and two RBI in six games. He also played six games in the World Series against the Atlanta Braves. He was 2-for-19 with a solo homer in six games as Toronto won its first championship.

    Gruber played 10 seasons and was a .259 hitter with 117 homers and 443 RBI. Gruber was traded to the California Angels after the 1992 season but played just 18 games with the Angels. California accused the Blue Jays of hiding a severe shoulder injury before the trade.

Gorman Thomas, 1982 Milwaukee Brewers (4-for-41)

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    Gorman Thomas shared the American League home-run title in 1982, belting 39 bombs for the Milwaukee Brewers. Thomas hit .245 for the year in 158 games and drove in 112 runs while scoring 96. He also fanned 143 times in 567 at-bats.

    Thomas was stymied in the American League Championship Series against the California Angels. He was 1-for-15 with a homer and three RBI. The Brewers came back to win the best-of-5 series after falling behind 2-0. Against the St. Louis Cardinals in the World Series, Thomas was 3-for-26 with three RBI. St. Louis won the title in seven games. For the postseason, Thomas struck out 14 times in 41 at-bats.

    Always a free swinger, Thomas played 13 seasons and was an All-Star in 1981. For his career, he hit .225 with 268 homers and 782 RBIs in 1,435 games. He also struck out 1,339 times in just 4,677 at-bats.

Gene Tenace, 1974 Oakland Athletics (2-for-20)

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    Gene Tenace is the third member of the 1974 Oakland Athletics to make this list. Tenace struggled in 1974, hitting .211 with 26 homers and 73 RBI in 484 at-bats. He did, however, lead the American League with 110 walks but he also struck out 105 times.

    Tenace was 0-for-11 with four walks in the four-game win over the Baltimore Orioles in the ALCS. In the World Series against the Los Angeles Dodgers, Tenace coaxed out 3 walks but was 2-for-9 with four strikeouts. He finished the postseason with eight Ks in 20 at-bats.

    Tenace hit .241 for his 15-year career with 201 home runs in 1,555 games. He drew 984 walks and struck out 998 times and was an All-Star in 1975.

Candy Maldonado, 1991 Toronto Blue Jays

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    Candy Maldonado didn’t join the Toronto Blue Jays until Aug. 9, 1991, when he came in a trade from the Milwaukee Brewers. But Maldonado stabilized left field for the Jays, hitting .277 in 52 games down the stretch with seven homers and 28 RBIs.  For the season, which included 34 games with the Brewers, Maldonado hit .250 in 288 at-bats.

    But Maldonado never got it going against the Minnesota Twins in the ALCS. He was 2-for-20 with a double and an RBI as the Blue Jays went down in five games.

    Maldonado played 15 seasons and hit 146 homers while batting .254 in 1,410 games.

Joe Morgan, 1973 Cincinnati Reds (2-for-20)

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    Tony Perez wasn’t the only future Hall of Famer to struggle in the 1973 postseason for the Cincinnati Reds. Joe Morgan was coming off a solid regular season, with a .290 average, 26 homers and 82 RBI in 157 games. Morgan also stole 67 bases and scored 116 runs.

    However, the New York Mets shut down Morgan in the NLCS. He was 2-for-20 with a double and an RBI in the Reds’ upset loss.

    Morgan played 22 years and was inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1990. He was a .271 lifetime hitter with 268 homers, 1,133 RBI and 689 stolen bases in 2,649 games. He scored 1,650 runs and had 2,517 hits to go with 1,865 walks. Morgan was the NL Most Valuable Player in 1975 and 1976 and was named to 10 All-Star teams.

Bobby Grich, 1973 Baltimore Orioles (2-for-20)

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    Bobby Grich played every game in 1973 for the Baltimore Orioles. He hit .251 with 12 homers and 50 RBI in 581 at-bats and drew 107 walks.

    In the ALCS against the Oakland Athletics, though, Grich was 2-for-20 with a solo homer. The Orioles lost to Oakland in the full five games.

    Grich was a six-time All-Star in 17 seasons. He hit .266 with 224 homers and 864 RBI in 2,008 games. He also scored 1,033 runs and walked 1,087 times.

Robby Thompson, 1987 San Francisco Giants (2-for-20)

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    Robby Thompson was a .262 hitter with 10 homers and 44 RBI for the San Francisco Giants in 1987. He also scored 62 runs and stole 16 bases and the Giants returned to the postseason for the first time in 15 years.

    Against the St. Louis Cardinals in the NLCS, Thompson was 2-for-20 with five walks and scored four runs. His hits were a triple and a homer and he had two RBIs. The Giants lost the series in seven games.

    Thompson made two All-Star appearances in his 11-year career. He hit .257 with 119 homers and 103 stolen bases in 1,304 games.

Carlos May, 1976 New York Yankees (2-for-19)

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    Carlos May was traded to the New York Yankees from the Chicago White Sox in May 1976 and was a part-time designated hitter.  With the Yankees, May hit .278 with three homers and 40 RBI in 288 at-bats. He hit .259 in 351 at-bats with three homers and 43 RBI including his 20 games with Chicago.

    May played in three of five games in the ALCS against the Kansas City Royals and was 2-for-10 with a double. In four World Series games against the Cincinnati Reds, though, May was 0-for-9 and the Yankees were swept.

    In his 10-year career, May was an All-Star twice and hit .274 in 1,165 games.

Andre Dawson, 1989 Chicago Cubs (2-for-19)

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    Knee problems limited Andre Dawson to just 118 games in 1989, even though he did make the All-Star team. He hit .252 with 21 homers and 77 RBI in 416 at-bats.

    Still slowed by the knee, Dawson was 2-for-19 in the NLCS against the San Francisco Giants. He had a double and three RBI and the Cubs lost in five games.

    Dawson was inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2010 after a 21-year career in which he hit 438 home runs and drove in 1,591 runs. He was a .279 career hitter with 2,774 hits and 314 stolen bases and was an All-Star nine times. And, he was recently rescued from the ivy at Wrigley Field by Kerry Wood, so he’s got that going for him.

Al Bumbry, 1983 Baltimore Orioles (2-for-19)

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    At 36, Al Bumbry had become a part-time player for the Baltimore Orioles in 1983. He hit .275 in 378 at-bats with three homers and 31 RBI. He also scored 63 runs and stole 12 bases.

    He played in three of the four games in the ALCS against the Chicago White Sox. Bumbry was 1-for-8 with a double and an RBI in the series. In the World Series against the Philadelphia Phillies, Bumbry was 1-for-11 with a double and an RBI in four games. Baltimore won the title in five games.

    Bumbry was an All-Star in 1980 and played 14 seasons. He hit .281 with 54 homers and scored 778 runs. He also stole 254 bases and hit 52 triples.

Reggie Jackson, 1982 California Angels (2-for-18)

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    Reggie Jackson made a splash after signing with the California Angels prior to the 1982 season. He tied for the league lead with 39 homers and drove in 101 runs while hitting .275.

    But he was hardly Mr. October in the ALCS against the Milwaukee Brewers. Jackson was just 2-for-18 with a homer and two RBI. He also struck out seven times and the Angels blew a 2-0 series lead and lost in five games.

    Jackson was inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1993 and was an All-Star 14 times. He hit 563 homers in his 21-year career and drove in 1,702 runs. Jackson stole 228 bases, had 2,584 hits and is still the career leader with 2,597 strikeouts.

Three-Series Era: Eric Chavez, 2003 Oakland Athletics (1-for-22)

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    Eric Chavez helped power the Oakland Athletics back to the postseason in 2003 after a one-year absence. Chavez hit .282 in 156 games with 29 homers and 101 RBI. He also smacked 39 doubles and scored 94 runs, all while playing Gold Glove defense at third base.

    Against the Boston Red Sox in the Division Series, Chavez was just 1-for-22 with a double in five games as the Athletics lost.

    Chavez has played 15 seasons through this year and has won six Gold Gloves. He is a .267 lifetime hitter with 248 homers and 850 RBI in 1,491 games.

Gabe Gross, 2008 Tampa Bay Rays (1-for-19)

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    Gabe Gross came to the Tampa Bay Rays in a trade from the Milwaukee Brewers in April 2008. He split time in right field the rest of the way and hit .242 with 13 homers and 38 RBI in 302 at-bats.

    Gross struggled in the postseason, though. He was 1-for-6 in a four-game victory over the Chicago White Sox in the Division Series. Gross went hitless, 0-for-10, as the Rays beat the Boston Red Sox in the ALCS. In the World Series, Gross played just once and was 0-for-3 with two RBI.

    Gross played seven years in the majors and hit .239 in 1,461 at-bats. He finished his career with 40 home runs and last played for the Oakland Athletics in 2010.

Gerardo Parra, 2011 Arizona Diamondbacks (1-for-18)

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    Gerardo Parra hit.292 for the Arizona Diamondbacks in 2011. In 445 at-bats, Parra had eight homers and 46 RBI and stole 15 bases in 16 attempts.

    Against the Milwaukee Brewers in the Division Series, Parra was 1-for-18 with a double. Arizona lost in five games while Parra struck out seven times.

    In four seasons, Parra is hitting .280 in 1,649 at-bats with 23 homers and 36 stolen bases.

Manny Ramirez, 1999 Cleveland Indians (1-for-18)

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    Manny Ramirez was an RBI machine for the Cleveland Indians in 1999. He led the league with 165 RBIs while belting 44 homers, hitting .333 and scoring 131 runs in 147 games. Besides being an All-Star, Ramirez also won the AL Hank Aaron Award in 1999.

    Against the Boston Red Sox in the Division Series, Ramirez was almost silent. He was 1-for-18 with eight strikeouts and 1 RBI in the Indians’ five-game defeat.

    Last in the majors with the Tampa Bay Rays in 2011, Ramirez was named to 12 All-Star teams in 19 seasons. He hit 555 homers with 1,831 RBIs and hit .312 for his career. He scored 1,544 runs and banged out 2,574 hits.

Carlos Ruiz, 2011 Philadelphia Phillies (1-for-17)

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    Carlos Ruiz hit .283 with six homers and 40 RBI in 410 at-bats as the Philadelphia Phillies’ catcher in 2011.

    Against the St. Louis Cardinals in the Division Series, Ruiz was silenced. He was 1-for-17 with a run scored and the Phillies lost in five games.

    Ruiz made his first All-Star team in 2012 and is a .275 hitter in seven seasons, with 52 homers and 299 RBIs.

Joey Cora, 1998 Cleveland Indians (1-for-17)

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    Joey Cora made it to the Cleveland Indians just in time to be on the postseason roster in 1998. He came over in an Aug. 31 trade from the Seattle Mariners and hit .229 with six RBI in 83 at-bats over the final month. For the year, Cora hit .276 with six homers and scored 111 runs in 155 games.

    He continued slumping in the postseason. He was 0-for-10 in the Division Series against the Boston Red Sox, a four-game win for Cleveland, and was benched in the ALCS after going 1-for-7 in the first two games against the New York Yankees. The Indians went down in six games.

    Cora was an All-Star in 1997 and played 11 seasons in the majors. He hit .277 with 1,035 hits in 1,119 games.

Andruw Jones, 2003 Atlanta Braves (1-for-17)

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    Andruw Jones was a force in the middle of the Atlanta Braves order in 2003. He was an All-Star and hit .277 with 36 homers and 116 RBI and scored 101 runs.

    But in the Division Series against the Chicago Cubs, Jones was pitched around. He was 1-for-17 in the series with one RBI. He drew four walks and struck out seven times as the Cubs won their first postseason series in 95 years in five games.

    Jones finished his 17th season in the majors in 2012. A six-time All-Star, Jones has 434 homers and 1,289 RBIs in 2,196 games. He is a career .254 hitter with 1,933 hits.

Dan Wilson, 1995 Seattle Mariners (2-for-33)

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    Dan Wilson helped the Seattle Mariners to their first-ever division title in 1995. The catcher hit .278 with nine home runs and 51 RBI in 399 at-bats.

    But in the postseason, Wilson was helpless at the plate. He was 2-for-17 with an RBI in Seattle’s five-game win over the New York Yankees in the Division Series. Against the Cleveland Indians in the ALCS, Wilson was 0-for-16 in six games as the Mariners went down.

    He was an All-Star in 1996 and his .262 in 14 seasons. He finished his career in 2005 with 1,097 hits in 1,299 games and hit 88 home runs.

Gary Sheffield, 2002 Atlanta Braves

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    In his first year with the Atlanta Braves, Gary Sheffield hit .307 with 25 homers and 85 RBIs in 135 games.

    Against the wild-card San Francisco Giants in the Division Series, however, Sheffield was 1-for-16 with seven walks. His lone hit was a solo home run. The Giants took the series in five games.

    Sheffield was a nine-time All-Star in a 22-year career that ended after the 2009 season. He finished with 2,689 hits, 509 home runs and 1,676 RBI and drew 1,475 walks.

Adam Jones, 2012 Baltimore Orioles (2-for-26)

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    Adam Jones made his second All-Star appearance in 2012 as the Baltimore Orioles reached the postseason for the first time in 15 years. Jones hit .287 with 32 home runs, both career highs, and drove in 82 runs while scoring 103.

    Jones was 0-for-3 in the first-ever Wild-Card Playoff against the Texas Rangers but drove in a run with a sacrifice fly to help Baltimore advance to the Division Series. Against the New York Yankees, Jones was 2-for-23 and struck out six games as the Orioles lost the series in five games.

    In seven seasons, Jones has 107 home runs and 373 RBI.

Alex Avila, 2011 Detroit Tigers (3-for-41)

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    Alex Avila made his first All-Star appearance in 2011 after helping the Detroit Tigers to a division title. He hit .295 with 19 home runs and 82 RBI in 141 games.

    But bothered by a balky knee in the postseason, Avila struggled. He was 1-for-16 in the five-game Division Series against the New York Yankees. He followed that up with a 2-for-25 against the Texas Rangers in the ALCS. He hit a solo homer in the series, which Texas won in six games. For the postseason, Avila struck out 16 times in 41 at-bats.

    Avila just completed his fourth season in 2012. He is a lifetime .261 hitter with 40 homers and 175 RBI in 390 games.

Robinson Cano, 2012 New York Yankees (3-for-40)

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    Robinson Cano’s horrific postseason was detailed in the introduction to this piece.

    To recap, Cano set a postseason record with 29 consecutive hitless at-bats. He was 2-for-22 with two doubles and four RBI in the Division Series against the Baltimore Orioles. In the ALCS against the Detroit Tigers, Cano was 1-for-18 as the Yankees were swept.

    In eight seasons, Cano is hitting .308 lifetime with 177 home runs and 715 RBIs.

Tino Martinez, 2002 St. Louis Cardinals (2-for-25)

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    Tino Martinez was brought in as a free agent to play first base after Mark McGwire retired from the St. Louis Cardinals following the 2001 season.  Martinez had a solid regular season, hitting .262 with 21 homers and 75 RBI in 150 games.

    Against the Arizona Diamondbacks in the Division Series, Martinez was 0-for-11 with two walks in St. Louis’ sweep. In a five-game loss to the San Francisco Giants in the NLCS, Martinez played in four of the games and was 2-for-14 with an RBI.

    Martinez made a pair of All-Star teams in his 16-year career that ended in 2005. He hit .271 in 2,023 games with 339 homers and 1,271 RBIs.

Chone Figgins, 2009 Los Angeles Angels (3-for-35)

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    Chone Figgins was a table-setter at the top of the Los Angeles Angels’ order in 2009. He led the American League with 101 walks and his .298 in 158 games, scoring 114 runs and stealing 42 bases. He also made his only All-Star appearance in 2009.

    But Figgins was awful as the Angels swept the Boston Red Sox in the Division Series. He was 0-for-12 in the three games. Against the New York Yankees in the ALCS, Figgins went 3-for-23 with an RBI and Los Angeles lost in six games.

    Figgins finished his 11th season in 2012. He is a .277 lifetime hitter with 1,285 hits in 1,244 games. He’s also stolen 337 career bases and scored 700 runs.

Miguel Tejada, 2003 Oakland Athletics (2-for-23)

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    Miguel Tejada played in all 162 games for the Oakland Athletics in 2003. The shortstop hit .278 with 27 homers, 42 doubles and 106 RBI. He scored 98 runs, as well, as the Athletics won the AL West.

    In the Division Series against the Boston Red Sox, Tejada was just 2-for-23. He had a double and two RBIs in the series, which the Red Sox won in five games.

    Tejada last played in the major leagues in 2011. He was a career .285 hitter with 304 homers and 1,282 RBIs in 2,118 games. He finished with 2,362 hits and scored 1,215 runs while belting 463 doubles.

Rafael Belliard, 1995 Atlanta Braves (3-for-32)

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    The diminutive Rafael Belliard was a reserve middle infielder for the Atlanta Braves in 1995. He hit .222 in 192 at-bats and drove in seven runs.

    But in the playoffs, Belliard was pressed into service with regular shortstop Jeff Blauser went down with a thigh injury.  Belliard was 0-for-5 in a reserve role against the Colorado Rockies in the Division Series. He then went 3-for-11 in a four-game sweep of the Cincinnati Reds in the NLCS. In the World Series against the Cleveland Indians, Belliard was 0-for-16 with an RBI as the Braves won their first title in Atlanta. It was the franchise’s first since 1957.

    Belliard played 17 seasons, almost always as a reserve, and hit .221 with two home runs in 2,301 at-bats.

Curtis Granderson, 2012 New York Yankees (3-for-30)

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    Robinson Cano wasn’t the only New York Yankee to struggle mightily in the 2012 postseason. Curtis Granderson was an All-Star in 2012 with 43 home runs and 106 RBI. He also scored 102 runs, hit a career-low.232 and struck out a career-high 195 times.

    Granderson was 3-for-19 with a solo homer in the five-game Division Series against the Baltimore Orioles. He followed that up with an 0-for-11 as the Yankees were swept by the Detroit Tigers in the ALCS. In 30 postseason at-bats, Granderson struck out 16 times.

    Granderson has made three All-Star appearances in his nine-year career. He is a career .262 hitter with 210 homers and 114 stolen bases in 1,126 games. He also has 1,098 strikeouts.

Stan Javier, 2000 Seattle Mariners (2-for-20)

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    Stan Javier was the fourth outfielder for the Seattle Mariners in 2000. He hit .275 in 105 games with five homers and 40 RBIs. He scored 61 runs, as well.

    In a three-game sweep of the Chicago White Sox in the Division Series, Javier was 1-for-6 with an RBI. In the ALCS, which the Mariners lost in six games to the New York Yankees, Javier made four appearances. He was 1-for-14 with an RBI.

    Javier played 17 seasons and hit .269 with 1,358 hits in 1,763 games. He finished his career with 781 runs scored and 246 stolen bases.

Mitch Moreland, 2011 Texas Rangers (3-for-29)

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    Mitch Moreland was the left-handed hitting portion of a first base committee for the Texas Rangers in 2011. Moreland started 89 games at first base and hit .259 with 16 homers and 51 RBIs in 464 at-bats.

    Moreland played three of the four games against the Tampa Bay Rays in the Division Series. He was 1-for-10 with a homer and two RBIs. Against the Detroit Tigers in the ALCS, he appeared in three of the six games and was 1-for-9. In the World Series against the St. Louis Cardinals, Moreland was 1-for-10 with a solo homer in three games. The Cardinals won the championship in seven games.

    Moreland just completed his third big-league season in 2012. He is hitting .264 in 936 at-bats, with 40 homers and 126 RBI.

Craig Biggio, 1999 Houston Astros (2-for-19)

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    Craig Biggio led the National League with 56 doubles for the Houston Astros in 1999. He hit .294 with 123 runs scored in 160 games. Biggio also added 16 homers, 73 RBIs and 28 stolen bases.

    For the third straight year, the Astros made the postseason and for the third straight year, they lost in the Division Series. In 1999, it was the Atlanta Braves who did in Houston in four games. Biggio was 2-for-19 in the series.

    Biggio played 20 years for the Astros, retiring after the 2007 season. The seven-time All-Star amassed 3,060 hits and 668 doubles in 2,850 games. Biggio hit 291 homers, drove in 1,175 runs, scored 1,844 times and stole 414 bases. He will appear on the Hall of Fame ballot for the first time this winter.

Chili Davis, 1999 New York Yankees (2-for-19)

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    In his last season in the majors, Chili Davis hit .269 in 146 games, 127 of them started as the designated hitter for the New York Yankees. Davis hit 19 homers and had 78 RBI at age 39.

    Davis was a bit player in the Division Series against the Texas Rangers, going 1-for-3 in his only appearance. Against the Boston Red Sox in the ALCS, Davis was 1-for-12 with an RBI. He made just one appearance in the World Series against the Atlanta Braves and went 0-for-4. But the Yankees swept Atlanta to win their second straight title.

    In 17 seasons, Davis hit .274 with 350 homers and 1,372 RBIs in 2,436 games. He finished his career with 2,380 hits and scored 1,240 runs.

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