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NBA Trade Rumors: Milwaukee Bucks Should Hold on to Stephen Jackson

CHICAGO, IL - JANUARY 27:  Stephen Jackson #5 of the Milwaukee Bucks moves against Ronnie Brewer #11 of the Chicago Bulls at the United Center on January 27, 2012 in Chicago, Illinois. The Bulls defeated the Bucks 107-100. NOTE TO USER: User expressly acknowledges and agrees that, by downloading and or using this photograph, User is consenting to the terms and conditions of the Getty Images License Agreement.  (Photo by Jonathan Daniel/Getty Images)
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Eric BowmanFeatured ColumnistFebruary 10, 2012

The Milwaukee Bucks have a talented roster capable of surprising people, which is exactly why they shouldn't trade Stephen Jackson away. 

The veteran guard isn't entirely happy at the moment, but he hasn't officially demanded a trade yet. Still, though, it's pretty apparent he wants out, and while the Bucks could easily grant his wish, they're better off keeping him. 

The Associated Press reported details of Jackson's current discomfort. 

"I'm supporting my teammates the way that I've always been," Jackson said Monday. "I'm going to respect the coaches, I'm going to respect everybody around. But at the end of the day, everybody knows I want to play. That's not a secret."

Jackson wouldn't say if he had requested a trade.

In 20 games this season, Jackson is averaging only 12 points. His value is decent, and if he's causing headaches then dealing him is definitely an option. 

However, since the Bucks are in eighth place in the Eastern Conference, they need to sit tight and work with what they have. 

If Jackson wants to play more, give him his minutes and tell him to make the most of it. Challenging a disgruntled player like that could go one of two ways. 

Jackson could get upset and angry for being called out, or he could make the best of it and try to show his coaches that he does deserve more playing time. 

If he isn't playing well, then then it's Jackson's fault for seeing less minutes. However, calling him out and giving him a chance to prove himself is far more beneficial than trading him. 

I don't think Jackson would get all that upset if the Bucks sat him down and told him they'd play him more but it's up to him to deliver. If he doesn't, then it's back to the platoon role.

In the last two games, Jackson has averaged 14.5 points and 31.5 minutes per game. The Bucks know he is capable of helping the team achieve big things, which is why they don't need to deal him. 

Milwaukee has what it takes to shock the NBA this year. Don't get me wrong, they're not championship material just yet, but they can certainly give the elites a scare in a playoff series. And who knows, with a little luck thrown their way, the Bucks could actually pull off a monster upset. 

With Brandon Jennings, Andrew Bogut, Drew Gooden and Carlos Delfino, Milwaukee has the skill to be effective in the postseason. 

Sitting tight, right now, is the Bucks' best bet. Jackson isn't a free agent after this season, so it's not like Milwaukee will be losing out on anything.

Hold onto to Jackson for the rest of the season, try to win big, and if he's still not happy once the season is over then trade him as the NBA draft draws near. 

Too often do athletes get worked up over things regarding only themselves. Jackson needs to keep quiet and think about the team as opposed to himself. In doing that, not only will he start playing better, but so will the Bucks as a whole.

 

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