Rugby Ruminations: Glasgow Warriors Actually Miles Better

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Rugby Ruminations: Glasgow Warriors Actually Miles Better

I have to admit it—I’ve always been kind of an Edinburgh man. I like the city more than Glasgow, went to University there, most of my friends live there. So, naturally, I gravitated toward Edinburgh Rugby as a natural home for my supporter’s sympathies—other than the mighty Highland, of course.

It was also pointed out recently that (inadvertently) I had even sustained this anti-Glasgow bias in the header of this site—now slightly redressed. But it seems in all that I overlooked something. Glasgow are actually pretty good.

Currently, they sit second in the Magners League. They are building a passionate and consistent crowd of supporters at Firhill, and Lineen is long past being happy with valiant defeats.

Performance—and results—are starting to matter to him, as well they should. A lot of the focus is on Andy Robinson rebuilding teams and careers at Edinburgh, but Lineen has been quietly turning the ship around on the other side of the country for a few years now, and this season it looks to have started steaming in the right direction.

Failing some sort of Munster miracle game, Glasgow took part in the Heineken Cup match of the weekend—even including Harlequin’s thriller in the Stade de France—against Bath today.

England’s second best team looked like they would have too much class, but Glasgow never gave up and eventually went down, 35-31. If you get a chance to watch the highlights on Sky tonight, I’d recommend it.

On Friday, Ian MacGeechan blamed Wasps’ endless kicking and lacklustre rugby (still enough to defeat Edinburgh) on the ELVs and new interpretations at the breakdown, yet Bath seem to manage quite well. Even Munster, led by kicking machine Ronan O Gara, are willing to throw it about a bit.

Glasgow manage it quite well, too. Kicking ping-pong only works if you’re certain that the other team will kick it back. Bath don’t. Problem solved.

Glasgow didn’t much either, and it gave us an enthralling game of rugby. I hope Geech will sort it out in time for the Lions tour.

Speaking of which, John Barclay is continuing his run of understated but utterly effective play in the tackle and at the breakdown that will hopefully see him as an outside pick for the tour at 7. Tom Rees and Martin Williams are probably ahead of him, but the Six Nations will give him a broad stage on which to showcase his talent. And he’s only 22. If not this one, maybe the next.

Ruaridh Jackson may yet prove the most important find of the season (though we probably won’t really know for a couple of years) in his first professional start at 10. He’s got great hands, a bit of pace, vision and his tactical kicking wasn’t too bad either (and that’s one area he could learn from Dan Parks).

In a Glasgow team filled with sevens players, they were always alive to the counter—as proven by Thom Evans’ opportunistic hat-trick of tries created largely through sheer pace and acceleration. You won’t have heard it here first, but I believe Ruaridh Jackson has a part to play in Scotland’s future.

The one area Glasgow did suffer in was depth, as illustrated by the very last play of the game. After the clock had ticked over the 80-minute mark, Bath were camped on Glasgow’s line with the sustained pressure that had characterised the second half (punctuated by breakaway Glasgow tries).

You felt the last chance for a well deserved—if unlikely—snatched victory was gone. Suddenly, there’s an interception and Jackson is steaming up the pitch—a repeat of his try minutes before that had put Glasgow into twin bonus point territory and announced that this game was far from over.

The Rec crowd go nuts as a frantic footrace begins, and Jackson finds the touchline closing him out. If there’s one man you want on his shoulder, it was Thom Evans, but he had gone off ten minutes previously to be replaced by the slightly less pacy Hefin O’Hare.

So, instead, Jackson chips past the defender, and looks to regather. But the ball bounces into touch, and the Rec breathes easy again. Not bad for a first game—to be so influential on the outcome, and against a World Cup winning fly-half on the other team.

Glasgow never stopped battling, but their class diminished slightly with every substitution (unlike Bath). Still, next time Jackson is stuck on the bench behind Parks, you might not be able to say the same.

Sean Lineen, I am fast becoming a fan.

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