Dwyane Wade: Riding High in April, Shot Down in May

Use your ← → (arrow) keys to browse more stories
Dwyane Wade: Riding High in April, Shot Down in May

First of all, I just want to thank Dave Morrison for becoming the first person to join my Asylum. Welcome Dave, I've been expecting you. 

If you've read my first article, you'll understand that I'm trying to build an army of readers similar to Max Kellerman. 

One down, the rest of the world to go...

On to today's blog.

Triple-Threat: Pass

Oh, how the mighty have fallen.

In 2004, Dwyane Wade snuck up on the League. After carrying the Heat past Baron Davis and the New Orleans Hornets, people knew Wade had arrived.

Then in 2005-06, Wade, alongside Shaquille O'Neal, willed his way to an NBA Championship past the Dallas Mavericks. Shortly after, he followed that performance up by playing in the FIBA games.

It was only a matter of time before his body would break down on him.

During the 2006-07 season, Wade missed a total of 31 games due to injury. However, he still managed to average 27.4 points, 7.5 assists, and 4.7 rebounds. 

Not even "Flash" could avoid lightning striking twice as Wade missed another 31 games during the 2007-08 season due to injury.

Many wrote Wade off after this. Some deemed his 2006 success as the pinnacle of his career. Also that season, Shaq was traded to the Phoenix Suns. This further developed the idea that Wade would never see the light of the Finals again.

However, Wade had different ideas.

After training with the legendary Tim Grover, Wade put on a stellar performance during the 2008 Beijing Olympics. Many recognize that it was his performance that kept the USA team steady during their gold-medal run.

Now, we are here in the present. Wade's Heat (7-7) have cooled a couple degrees due to their undersized positions in the front court.

The average size of the Heat's starting frontcourt is roughly 6'8", compared to the Celtics' and Lakers' 6'9" and 7'0 starting frontcourt, respectively. It doesn't seem that bad on paper, but when you add in the fact that Boston and L.A. have more big players on their bench, Miami doesn't stack up...literally.

It seems as if Wade has traded places with Kobe Bryant. Remember, just three years ago it was Bryant who was on the outside looking in.

The Lakers missed the playoffs for the fifth time in franchise history.  This was after Shaq cut ties with the Lakers. Considering that after the "Big Moocher," or as I like to call him, the "Man-of-Steal," left Miami with a dismal 15 wins last season, I'd say Wade is in good company.

As Wade leads his young team this season, he's averaging a career best 28.5 points, 7.6 assists, and 4.9 rebounds while shooting 48.8 percent from the field.

Wade went from winning gold in the summer to struggling to win at all in the regular season. He may not have all the talent that is necessary to win right now, but he's proven time and time again that he has the heart.

Fall down seven times, stand up eight right?

I'm out.

Load More Stories

Follow Miami Heat from B/R on Facebook

Follow Miami Heat from B/R on Facebook and get the latest updates straight to your newsfeed!

Out of Bounds

Miami Heat

Subscribe Now

We will never share your email address

Thanks for signing up.