MLB's 10 Greatest First Basemen of All Time

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MLB's 10 Greatest First Basemen of All Time

10. Jeff Bagwell

Bagwell was one of the most consistent hitters of all time, as, in one stretch of his career. he had eight consecutive seasons of 30 home runs. In his 15 seasons, he had a .297 average, 449 home runs, 1,529 RBI, 1,517 runs scored, 202 stolen bases, a .480 on-base percentage and a .540 slugging percentage. He also won the 1991 Rookie of the Year Award.

He was selected to the All Star team four times, three Silver Slugger Awards and led the league in runs scored three times and RBI once. He was a solid defensive player as well, as he won a gold glove in 1994. His best season came in 1994, when he won the MVP award as he had a .368 average, 39 home runs, 116 RBI, 104 runs scored, 15 stolen bases, and an amazing .750 slugging percentage.

 

9. Harmon Killebrew

Killebrew was one of the best power hitters of all time, as he is ninth all time with 573 home runs. In 22 seasons, he also had a .256 average, a .376 on-base percentage, 1,584 RBI, and 1,283 runs scored. Killebrew was selected to the All Star team 13 times, starting at first base for three of them.

His best season came in the 1969, as he won his only MVP award. In that season, he had a .276 average, 49 home runs, 140 RBI, 106 runs scored, and an amazing .427 on base percentage. He also led the league in home runs an amazing six times and in RBI three times.

 

8. Jim Thome

Thome has been one of the biggest power threats in the league over the last 15 seasons, and one of the most consistent as he has hit 30 home runs or more in 12 of the last 13 seasons. So far in his 18 year career, he has a .279 average, 541 home runs, 1,488 RBI, 1,431 runs scored, 2,048 base hits, a .406 on-base percentage, and a .560 slugging percentage.

He has been selected to the All Star team five times, starting at first base in two of them. He also won the Silver Slugging Award in 1996 and led the league in slugging percentage once and in home runs once. His 541 career home runs rank 14th all time and he ranks 19th all time in slugging percentage.

7. Albert Pujols

Pujols is already this high on the list, even though he has only played eight seasons in the league so far. However, he has a .334 average, 319 home runs, 977 RBI, 947 runs scored, 342 doubles, a .425 on-base percentage, and a .624 slugging percentage.

He has been in the top five in the MVP voting six times already and will likely be at the top this season. He has been selected to the All Star team six times and has won the Silver Slugging Award three times.

He won his only MVP award in the 2005 season when he had a .330 average, 41 home runs, 117 RBI, 129 runs scored, and 16 stolen bases. He is also one of the better defensive players, as he won a Gold Glove in 2006. Finally, he has proven to also be one of the most clutch hitters, as he has already led the Cardinals to the World Series twice, winning one of them.

 

6. Hank Greenberg

Greenberg is probably the most underrated players of all time. In 1,394 career games played, he had a .313 average, 331 home runs, 1,276 RBI, 1,051 runs scored, a .412 on-base percentage, and a .605 slugging percentage. He also won two MVP awards in his 13 year career, having his best season in 1935 as he had a .328 average, 36 home runs, an amazing 170 RBI, 121 runs scored, 46 doubles, a .411 on-base percentage and a .628 slugging percentage.

He was selected to the All Star team five times, starting at first base in one of them. He led the Tigers to the World Series four times, winning two of them in the 1935 and 1945 seasons. However, he missed about four seasons during his prime as he had to fight in World War II.

If that hadn't happened, he probably would be one of the other greats we would remember from the really old days.

 

5. Willie McCovey

McCovey was one of the most powerful batters, as he is one of the few players with over 500 home runs, as he hit 521 in his 22 year career. He also had a .270 average, .374 on-base percentage, 1,555 RBI, 1,229 runs scored, and 353 doubles. He won the Rookie of the Year Award in 1959.

He was selected to the All Star team six times, starting at first base for four of them and winning the All-Star Game MVP in 1969. He led the league in home runs three times and RBI twice. McCovey also won the MVP award in 1969 when he had a .320 average, 45 home runs, 126 RBI, 101 runs scored, a .453 on-base percentage, and a .656 slugging percentage.

 

4. Frank Thomas

Thomas has been one of the best right-handed hitters of all time. So far, in 19 seasons, he has a .301 average, a .419 on-base percentage, 521 home runs, 1,704 RBI, 1,494 runs scored, 2,468 base hits, and 495 doubles. He won back-to-back MVPs in 1993 and 1994, with his best season in 1994, as he had a .353 average, 38 home runs, 101 RBI, 106 runs scored, 34 doubles, a .487 on-base percentage, and an amazing .729 slugging percentage.

He has also been selected to the All Star team five times, starting at first base twice. He has won four Silver Slugging Awards, a batting title in 1997, and four on-base-percentage titles. Finally, he ranks 18th all time in total home runs and 21st all time in total RBI.

3. Eddie Murray

Murray is one of only four players in the history of baseball to have hit 500 home runs and 3,000 base hits. Think about that! The other three are Hank Aaron, Willie Mays, and Rafael Palmeiro (who shouldn't count because of steroids). In his 21-year career, he had a .287 average, 504 home runs, 1,917 RBI, 1,627 runs scored, 3,255 base hits, 560 doubles, and 110 stolen bases.

Murray was selected to the All-Star team eight times and won the Silver Slugging Award three times. He was also a very good defensive player, as he won three Gold Gloves. He won the Rookie of the Year Award in 1977. However, he never won an MVP award, as he never got the credit he deserved. He helped lead the Orioles to two World Series appearances, winning one of them.

 

2. Jimmie Foxx

Foxx is one of the greatest offensive players of all time. In his 20-year career, he had a .325 average, 534 home runs, 1,922 RBI, 1,751 runs scored, 2,646 base hits, 458 doubles, a .428 on-base percentage, and a fantastic .609 slugging percentage. He was selected to the All Star team nine times, starting at first base twice. He won two batting titles, three on-base-percentage titles and five slugging-percentage titles.

He won three MVP awards and had his best season in 1933, as he won the triple crown. In that season, he had a .356 average, 48 home runs, 163 RBI, 125 runs scored, a .449 on-base percentage, and an amazing .703 slugging percentage. Finally, he led his team to the World Series three times, winning two of them.

 

1. Lou Gehrig

Gehrig is one of the 10 greatest players of all time. In his 17-year career, he had a .340 average, 493 home runs, 1,995 RBI, 1,888 runs scored, 2,721 base hits, 534 doubles, 102 stolen bases, a .447 on-base percentage, and a .632 slugging percentage. He won two MVP awards, having his best season in 1927, when he had a .373 average, a .474 on-base percentage, 47 home runs, 175 RBI, 149 runs scored, 218 base hits, 52 doubles, 18 triples, and an unheard of .765 slugging percentage.

He was selected to the All Star team seven times, starting at first base five times. He also won the Triple Crown in 1934, but he did not win the MVP that season. He had five on-base-percentage titles, two slugging-percentage titles, four runs-scored titles, three home-run titles, and five RBI titles.

Finally, he helped lead the Yankees advance to the World Series seven times, winning six.

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