Clay Guida and 10 Fighters Who Would Benefit Most from Having 5-Round Fights

First LastCorrespondent IJune 3, 2011

Clay Guida and 10 Fighters Who Would Benefit Most from Having 5-Round Fights

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    It's getting to the point where fights will need to go more than three rounds to determine a clear winner. There have been many recent instances where fans have wished a fight had been five rounds instead of three.

    Not only would it result in more finishes, it would also be an intriguing challenge for each fighter to fight harder when the fight gets deep in the fourth and fifth rounds, and their are many who do this already but rarely get to show it because they aren't fighting for a title.

    These are 10 non-champions who would benefit most from five-round fights.

No. 10: Michael Bisping

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    LAS VEGAS - MAY 28:  UFC fighter Michael Bisping weighs in for his fight against UFC fighter Dan Miller at UFC 114: Rampage versus Rashad at the Mandalay Bay Hotel on May 28, 2010 in Las Vegas, Nevada.  (Photo by Jon Kopaloff/Getty Images)
    Jon Kopaloff/Getty Images

    Ultimate Fighter Season 3 winner Michael "The Count" Bisping has a tendency to start his fights slow. He often gets dropped early in each of his fights and starts to adjust midway or close to the end of the round.

    For fighters like Bisping and Rashad Evans, who both are known to start fights slow, an extra two rounds may help them relax more in the opening minutes knowing they have a whole 25 minutes to establish a comfortable rhythm.

    Bisping is a distance fighter, and a five-round fight would help him fight at a more comfortable pace that can be balanced out more evenly instead of being forced in the first round. If he ever fights Anderson Silva, the five-round factor will play into his hands more than they will for Silva.

No. 9: Stephan Bonnar

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    Many people forget that Stephan Bonnar won the third round against Jon Jones on two judges' scorecards. Had this fight been five rounds, he may have snatched a victory over the current light-heavyweight champion.

    Bonnar needs to be hit first before he can be considered in the fight, and a lot of blood usually comes before he takes over his opponent.

    "The American Psycho" has never been stopped other than by cuts so he deserves an extra two rounds to try to obtain a victory in a fight that he has lost over three rounds.

No. 8 Demetrious Johnson

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    Demetrious Johnson is the perfect 135-pound fighter and relies on relentless pressure and control with takedowns and wrestling.

    Many fans thought he lost his previous fight versus Miguel Torres at UFC 130. Over three rounds, he had top control over the former WEC champion, but it was Torres who was showing offense and trying to wrap him up in submissions.

    These are the types of fights and fighters who need five round fights to prove who really is the better of the two. Wrestlers like to grind down their opponents, and it's in the later rounds that the pressure begins to show.

No. 7 Forrest Griffin

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    Without any considerable advantage in striking power or crafty grappling skills, Forrest Griffin is a cardio machine, and that's his most valuable asset.

    It was his fight at UFC 86 that really showed how much of an advantage Griffin had going five rounds when he defeated Quinton "Rampage" Jackson to become the light-heavyweight champion. After being rocked in the first round, Griffin came back in the following rounds to win a very close decision.

    Griffin likes to use leg kicks, and while the effects of these can be sensed early, they really start to take their toll in the later rounds.

    There's a good chance Griffin wouldn't have a loss to Tito Ortiz had their first fight been five rounds. He probably would have stopped him in the rematch.

     

No. 6: Jon Fitch

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    SYDNEY, AUSTRALIA - FEBRUARY 27:  BJ Penn of the USA is pinned down by Jon Fitch of the USA during their welterweight bout part of UFC 127 at Acer Arena on February 27, 2011 in Sydney, Australia.  (Photo by Mark Kolbe/Getty Images)
    Mark Kolbe/Getty Images

    There's no question who the better man was the night Jon Fitch fought BJ Penn at UFC 127.

    It was a close fight throughout, but it was Fitch who ended strong, and he really showed just how much he had left. Penn would have never made it five rounds and the fight been scheduled for 25 minutes.

    Maybe Fitch doesn't need five rounds to prove he is the superior fighter, but there is a good chance he would have a lot more finishes if eight of his last nine decision victories had been extended for two extra rounds.

     

     

No. 5: Diego Sanchez

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    Photo by Tracy Lee at Yahoo Sports
    Photo by Tracy Lee at Yahoo Sports

    Diego Sanchez often has his best round in the final stage of the fight, and he has proven it time and time again against fighters like Martin Kampmann, Paulo Thiago, Nick Diaz and John Alessio.

    Sanchez' fighting spirit grows by the minute, and it would help him if he had a full five-round distance to show just how much he really has.

    There aren't too many fighters who can handle the pressure of Sanchez for three rounds, and there are even fewer who can handle two extra rounds with the fighter formerly known as "The Nightmare."

     

     

No. 4: Urijah Faber

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    Former WEC Featherweight Champion Urijah Faber made the jump down to the 135-pound division last year and is getting his shot at current UFC Bantamweight Champion Dominick Cruz at UFC 132.

    He won't have to worry about not having five rounds in that fight, and it works to his advantage. He may have the best cardio out of anyone in the division, and this will play a big factor in who wins the fight.

    Cruz has gone the five-round distance as well, and the final two rounds is where the best drama will probably occur in the bout.

    Look for "The California Kid" to make his statement late in the fight if he emerges victorious.

No. 3: Clay Guida

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    How many times have you watched a Glay Guida fight and told yourself you wish it was five rounds instead of three?

    Guaranteed, you will be doing that this weekend if his fight with Anthony Pettis goes the distance. The fight will be featured as the main event on the Ultimate Fighter Finale.

    Guida has had several close bouts with him ending strong but being on the wrong side of a decision. In fights with Tyson Griffin and Diego Sanchez, "The Carpenter" came up short with two split-decisions in two very exciting fights.

     

No. 2: Lyoto Machida

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    When former UFC Light-Heavyweight Champion Lyoto Machida met Quinton "Rampage" Jackson at UFC 123, nobody was expecting the outcome to be as controversial as it was.

    With his defensive-oriented fighting style, it appeared Machida didn't get started till the third round of the fight when he rocked Jackson with a combination that put him against the cage.

    Machida preceded to take the former champion down and postured into full mount. Even with the most defining moment of the fight and the momentum on his side, he lost a split-decision.

    Machida's karate is the type of fighting style that has everyone wondering what's going to happen next. It may take two, three or more rounds, and by the time we find out, the fight is usually already over.

No. 1: Sean Sherk

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    CHICAGO- OCTOBER 25:  Tyson Griffin (L) punches Sean Sherk in a Lightweight bout at UFC's Ultimate Fight Night at Allstate Arena on October 25, 2008 in Chicago, Illinois. (Photo by Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images)
    Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images

    If there was anyone who was built for five-round fights, it is the former UFC Lightweight Champion Sean "The Muscle Shark" Sherk.

    Almost every wrestler benefits from an extended fight, but with Sherk's cardio and will to win, knows what it means to win every minute of a five-round fight. He did it twice against Kenny Florian and Hermes Franca. He even took Matt Hughes the distance.

    He hasn't fought since snatching a split-decision win over Evan Dunham at UFC 119, but injuries have been holding him back. His return is anticipated to for late summer.