6 Ridiculous Rankings from the WBC and a Bonus 1 from ESPN.com's Dan Rafael

Dean FentonCorrespondent IMay 21, 2011

6 Ridiculous Rankings from the WBC and a Bonus 1 from ESPN.com's Dan Rafael

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    Finding stupidity in the WBC rankings is about as difficult as finding water in the ocean. 

    Long a source of controversy, the WBC rankings are generally believed to be more about politics and money than boxing performance. 

    Here are six of the most ridiculous current rankings from the WBC, along with a bonus from ESPN boxing writer Dan Rafael.

Kelly Pavlik: No. 1 Supermiddleweight Contender

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    Kelly Pavlik has spent his career at Middleweight and held the Middleweight title until a decision loss to Sergio Martinez in April 2010. 

    He pulled out of a November 2010 Supermiddleweight fight on the Pacquiao-Margarito undercard and, a few weeks later, checked himself into the Betty Ford Center to deal with alcohol abuse issues. 

    Resuming his career this spring, Pavlik is going to campaign at Supermiddleweight.  His first fight at 168 was a lackluster mixed decision win on the Pacquiao-Mosley undercard.

    A career fighting at 160.  A unanimous decision loss at 160 in April 2010.  A trip to rehab. A loaded division at Supermiddleweight that includes Ward, Bute, Froch, Kessler, Johnson and others. 

    What does the WBC do?  Rank him as the No. 1 contender at 168, of course.

Martinez Middleweight "Diamond Champion"; Zbik Middleweight Champion

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    Sergio Martinez won the Middleweight title in a unanimous decision over Kelly Pavlik in April 2010.  He defended his belt with a devastating knockout of top contender Paul Williams in November 2010 and a TKO against Dzinziruk in March 2011.  He's now the WBC's "Diamond Belt Champion."

    Sebastian Zbik has fought his entire career in Europe and had held the WBC "interim" Middleweight title since 2009.  He's now the WBC Middleweight Champion.

    What is the difference between the "Diamond Belt Champion" and the "Champion"?  The WBC isn't really saying.  This is akin to the NFL declaring that the Green Bay Packers are the "Diamond Champions" and the New England Patriots are the "Champions," since the Patriots won 14 games this year.

    Martinez is the only "Diamond" champion at any weight class according to the WBC.  The reason for this stupidity is apparent on the next slide.

Julio Cesar Chavez Jr.: #1 Middlweight Contender

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    The photo explains how an unimpressive fighter who has been babied with handpicked opponents throughout his career ends up the No. 1 middleweight contender according the the WBC...have all-time great Julio Cesar Chavez as a father.

    While Chavez was a true warrior in the ring who fought the best available fighters of his time, the son has taken a different route to boxing prominence.  Yes, he is 42-0 but a review of his 42 opponents finds a group of tomato cans, novices, and easy stepping stones. 

    His only real "quality" win is against John Duddy last year.  Other than that fight, he's been handled extremely cautiously, banking on his famous name to draw the crowds, and the ranking from the WBC.

    To take the farce a step further, WBC Middleweight "Champion" Zbik and #1 contender Chavez Jr. square off on June 4 in a Middleweight "Title" fight.  A "Champion" who isn't and a #1 contender who is a famous name with a blown up record...this is the WBC.

Ionut Dan Ion: No. 4 Welterweight Contender

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    While some of the WBC madness is easy to figure out "(the Chavez ranking, while ridiculous, is easy to understand) some of the craziness defies understanding.  Ionut Dan Ion as the No. 4 Welterweight falls into this category.

    The 147-pound weight class has been a featured grouping over the past several years, thanks to Floyd Mayweather Jr. and, recently, Manny Pacquiao.  

    While Mayweather and Pacquiao have clearly put themselves a step above the competition, there are talented fighters, young and old, in the division.

    How Romanian-born, Canadian-based Ionut Dan Ion ends up the No. 4 welterweight according to the WBC is anyone's guess.

    He's fought one "quality" fight and he lost it to Selcuk Aydin.  His only other notable win is against Steve Forbes who is turning into a professional opponent with six losses in his last nine fights. 

    Ionut Dan Ion may turn out to be a solid fighter at 147 or he may turn out to be a bum.  He needs to fight some quality opponents before the verdict is decided but that doesn't stop the WBC from ranking him No. 4.

Chris Arreola: No. 2 Heavyweight

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    Chris Arreola was once the hope of American Heavyweight boxing.  Unfortunately, his lack of dedication to training has left him as a story of what might have been. 

    In his biggest fight, a title shot against Vitali Klitschko, Chris weighed in at 251 pounds and against Adamek he was a half-pound lighter.  He lost both fights. 

    Chris has been as low as 229 pounds and as high as 263 pounds...every fight seems to be as much a battle with his waistline as with his opponent.  Arreola's own management team has complained about his lack of dedication to training, at times.

    Arreola is only 30 years old and there is still a chance that he can decide to dedicate himself to boxing but to consider him the No. 2 Heavyweight contender in the world is an insult to the intelligence of the boxing community.

Bonus: Shane Mosley: ESPN's Dan Rafael's No. 9 Welterweight

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    Shane was once a great fighter and is probably a borderline Hall of Fame candidate.  Once, though, is the key word of that sentence. 

    His last three fights have been disasters.  A near shutout loss to Mayweather, an unwatchable draw against Sergio Mora and the pathetic "run away" performance against Pacquiao. 

    Mosley is the poster child for fighters who have lost "it," yet ESPN's Dan Rafael has him as the #9 welterweight in the world.

    Rafael loves to poke fun at the ridiculous rankings of the boxing organizations, with good reason, but putting Mosley in as the No. 9 welterweight after his last three performances is just as ludicrous.