Reforming the System: My Proposal for Postseason Division I College Football

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Reforming the System: My Proposal for Postseason Division I College Football

The BCS system is very broken.  I do not need to give specific examples to illustrate that fact because it is so painfully obvious.  Take a look at the BCS standings after the wild ride yesterday in college football. 

With No. 1 Oklahoma going down against No. 5 Texas, No. 4 LSU going down to no. 11 Florida, and No. 3 Missouri going down against No. 17 Oklahoma State, the entire BCS system is shaken to the core.  Who deserves to be No. 1 now? 

A good case can be made for Texas given that the Longhorns knocked off the nationally top-ranked Sooners.  A good case can be made for the Penn State Nittany Lions who are undefeated as well over the course of this season.

Regardless of who deserves to be No. 1, will the BCS championship game be between two legitimate teams which no one in the rest of the country could argue otherwise that a third team should have been considered?  Unlikely!!!  The last time there was such a matchup it was the 2002 double overtime classic played by the only two undefeated teams in the country, Miami and Ohio State.

So, how does the system get reformed?  People talk about a postseason format, but the proposals are either vague or non-existent.  It is time that someone laid down a concise format.  So, here is mine:

There are six BCS conferences [ACC, Big 10, Big 12, Big East, SEC, PAC 10].  Give the conference champions for these six conferences an automatic bid into the tournament.  Then, add the top six "at-large" teams in the BCS standings into the tournament as well. 

Thus, there are 12 teams who will receive bids into the tournament.  These teams will be seeded 1 through 12 based on their final poll positions in the BCS standings following the final week of games in the regular season.

The top four seeds will receive a first round bye.  Teams five through 12 will play each other in an opening round at the home fields of the top four teams and those sites will also play host to the quarterfinal games as well.

The winner of the 5-12 game will face the No. 4 team in the quarterfinals. [Both games played at the home field of the No. 4 team] 

The winner of the 6-11 game will face the No. 3 team in the quarterfinals. [Both games played at the home field of the No. 3 team] 

The winner of the 7-10 game will face the No. 2 team in the quarterfinals. [Both games played at the home field of the No. 2 team] 

The winner of the 8-9 game will face the No. 1 team in the quarterfinals. [Both games played at the home field of the No. 1 team] 

For the semifinals and the finals, the site should be in a neutral location and that same location should host all four games of the Final Four of Division 1 College Football.

The winner of the 5-12 v. 4 game will face the winner of the 8-9 v. 1 game.

The winner of the 6-11 v. 3 game will face the winner of the 7-10 v. 2 game.

The winners of both semifinals will play for the championship.

The losers of both semifinals will play a consolation game for third place.

The first round can be played during the last week of December after the Christmas Holiday and right before New Year's.  In fact, by the time the NFL playoffs begin, the college football BCS tournament would already be at least in the semifinals!!!  Thus, there is extreme unlikelihood of TV conflicts!!!

If there is a better format for Division I college football, please elaborate.  What flaws are in mine?  What is commendable in mine?  I am curious about this.

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