Red Sox Walk Off with Win, Yankees Close Season on Loss in Boston

Use your ← → (arrow) keys to browse more stories
Red Sox Walk Off with Win, Yankees Close Season on Loss in Boston

The Boston Red Sox beat the New York Yankees, 4-3, after 10 innings in the second game of a day-night doubleheader Sunday night to close out the 2008 Major League Baseball season.

Sidney Ponson started for the Yankees. He lasted six innings, gave up one earned run on four hits, walked none, and set down five.

Tim Wakefield started for the Red Sox. He pitched five innings, gave up no runs on two hits, walked none, and struck out three.

The Red Sox put up a run in the bottom of the first. Chris Carter grounded out to first base, allowing Coco Crisp to cross the plate for a quick, 1-0 lead.

The Yankees knotted it at one in the top of the sixth. Xavier Nady grounded into a force out, but Robinson Cano scored, tying the game at one.

Boston would come back to take the lead in the bottom of the eighth. Sean Casey singled to score Crisp and Alex Cora, giving the Red Sox a 3-1 lead.

The Yankees would not go down easily, however. In the bottom of the ninth, Juan Miranda delivered a sacrifice fly and RBI to score Wilson Betemit, and Cano connected for an RBI single to score Johnny Damon, and the Yankees tied it, 3-3.

Finally, in the bottom of the 10th, Jonathan Van Every hit a walk-off single to score Cora, giving the Red Sox a walk-off win over the Yankees.

Devern Hansack notched the win and finished at 1-0.

Jose Veras took the loss and ended the season with a record of 5-3.

Justin Masterson and David Aardsma each recorded blown saves.

Despite the loss, the Yankees won their final weekend series against Boston, and possibly took the air out of the Red Sox going into their ALDS series against the Angels, which will start on Wednesday in Anaheim.

"Our guys fought and fought and fought, we tied it, but couldn't win it," Yankees manager Joe Girardi said to the media after the game. "We played well the last few games; it was a tough season for us and we didn't reach our goals. I am sad; I wanted to be playing on Wednesday or Thursday, but it's motivation for next year."

The Yankees finished in third place behind Tampa Bay and Boston, and missed the playoffs by eight games in the American League East Division. The Yankees also finished in second place to Boston in the wild card standings, and missed out by six games.

"It's a failure. We didn't accomplish anything we set out to accomplish when we set out for spring training," Derek Jeter told the press after the game. "It was an up-and-down season the whole way and we don't deserve to play in the postseason. We weren't consistent enough; we didn't play good enough.

"Everyone should take not going to the postseason personally. If you don't, there's something wrong with you." 

The 2008 Yankees ended at a record of 89-73 and failed to win 90 games for the first time since the 2000 campaign.

The Yankees enter the offseason with Ivan Rodriguez, Bobby Abreu, Mike Mussina, Jason Giambi, Andy Pettitte, and Carl Pavano as free agents and possible pinstripe departures.

 

*Reporter's note: I'd like to thank everyone who read and enjoyed my game recaps this season. It's been a rocky road for our Yankees, but we stuck through it.

The team didn't make it to postseason, but I guarantee that they'll make up for it next year. The Yanks dealt with many injuries and bad luck, but now they will move on to a busy offseason. I'm sure they'll make headlines here on Bleacher Report and in every New York newspaper.

I hope I reported well on each and every recap, informed the readers, and touched all who read them. Thank you all for reading. Next year's roster may look a lot different, but no need to worry: there will be Yankee baseball again.

Load More Stories

Follow New York Yankees from B/R on Facebook

Follow New York Yankees from B/R on Facebook and get the latest updates straight to your newsfeed!

Out of Bounds

New York Yankees

Subscribe Now

We will never share your email address

Thanks for signing up.