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You Are Looking Live: 3 Tips To Keeping the Sanctity of Sports Broadcasting

Levi BerceyContributor IFebruary 12, 2011

You Are Looking Live: 3 Tips To Keeping the Sanctity of Sports Broadcasting

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    Most sports fans understand that a certain "magic" goes into a great sporting event. Sometimes it's an 80-yard pass, the shot goes in when it's not supposed to, or a player might steal home base.

    What most people might not understand is that those games are sometimes ruined by horrible announcing. Thankfully, it's uncommon for a really important game to fall victim to "dreadful announcing."

    However, to make certain it doesn't become the focus of a game, here are three vital keys to safely watching your favorite games.

The Dull and The Restless

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    John Gichigi/Getty Images

    Game Seven only happens so often, the big plays are usually scattered throughout a game, and it's not always easy to keep a three or four hour conversation going.

    1. Let the fans vote on the broadcast pairings.

    It's almost semi-ridiculous some of the people that are chosen to announce games these days. It's very understandable that we can't get a Hall of Fame player for every broadcast or someone that's really articulate on television. People have lives, other carriers and even better opportunities.

    I do think a paring of say, Urban Meyer and Lloyd Carr would be great for a college football game. They were two very different coaches in terms of the styles of football both teams played. They also coached against each other and have a wealth of experience in different era's.

    2. Maybe a little less conversation?

    This is the tricky aspect of a announcer's job. How to keep not only everyone watching at home entertained, but themselves as well. My advice is that a little conversation goes along way, in more ways than one. Most of the time, bad jokes are thrown out, inaccurate stat-lines are blurted out, and there is an occasional Freudian slip.

    I can't really fault broadcasters for this though, it's so much harder than it looks. We're human and we're not perfect, I just wish they had some more liveliness in some games.   

Fight For Your Right To Party

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    David Cannon/Getty Images

    I really believe that this is the most crucial element of sports broadcasting. Scream when it's time to scream, yell when everyone else is yelling, and shout because you want to.

    When the shot falls, when the hail marry is completed, or when the balls goes in the hall. Let everyone at home feel some bit of the emotion inside the arena. Far too often we've seen announcers drop the ball when it comes to...dropping the ball!

    A big fumble is going to possibly decide the game, everyone in the stands is going bonkers, at home it's chaos, and the announcers are snoozing.

    Describe the setting, the sound, the passion of what's going on.

    Establish the tone of the game with an upbeat attitude and a positive outlook. Make a bold prediction and give us an attractive and attentive viewpoint we hadn't thought of.

Don't Be A Robot

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    Clive Mason/Getty Images

    Most importantly, it should be fun to watch sports. It should be exciting, comfortable and not upsetting. All that's needed is accuracy, articulation and a good sense of humor.

    Hopefully, the good tradition of sports broadcasting continues to thrive. Be on the lookout for dreadful announcers though, it's not going away.

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