WWE Cage Matches: A Chainlinked History of Cages Matches

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WWE Cage Matches: A Chainlinked History of Cages Matches

In the WWE gimmick matches are an attraction to the ever-faithful wrestling fans. One of the most popular gimmick matches around is the cage match. The WWE has four variations of Cage Matches that have their own sets of rules, customs and mythic qualities to them. The three types I'll delve into are Cages, Hell in the Cell and the Elimination Chamber Match.

Cages are the regular cage matches that are found in all wrestling promotions in the world with the first of it's kind taking place on June 25, 1937 in Atlanta Georgia. The very first cage match was made of chicken wire. In the 1980's cage matches started to be made with steel bars and the more modern version of the match has chain link fencing which is the default cage setup nowadays as it's inexpensive to transport and make.

The size of the cage varies every year depending on various factors. This match is usually used as a stipulation to keep wrestlers escaping in a cowardly fashion or to prevent any interferences. The only ways to win this match is via submission, pinfall and escaping the cage by going out the cage door or climbing out with both feet touching the floor. Over the years this match has been used so much to the point that even house shows use the cages which ended up eroding the importance and aura of special attraction of seeing this match.

Hell In the Cell is 16 feet high and weighing over two tons of pure hell that was created in October 5, 1997 at the Kiel Center in St. Louis, Missouri.  It’s surrounded by a steel chain link fence cage structure and has a top to it. It’s considered a gimmick match to end a very hot feud and has the reputation of ending careers. Legitimate injuries have occurred in the match the most famous is Mick Foley falling through the cage onto the ring, suffering broken ribs and other severe injuries.

Dusty Rhodes vs Ric Flair in a classic cage match

Due to the brutal nature of the match it is used rarely with only the most experienced wrestlers in an intense feud battle within it. The only way to win is by pin-fall or submission.  It’s has its own Pay-Per-View centered on three hell in the cell matches which made it common enough to lose its rarity and due to the new PG rating on WWE programs, bloodless to where it just became a cage match with a roof.

The Elimination Chamber is 36 feet (11 m) in diameter and is composed of 16 tons of steel and 2 miles (3.2 km) of chain. The first one was in 2002  and six wrestlers fight in the cage but the twist is that four of the wrestlers are placed in pods made of bullet proof glass to be released randomly at a set time. As the name implies wrestlers are eliminated from the match til two remain to decide the eventful winner.   This match mainly used to decide a new world champion or number one contender. The match has a reputation of being brutal regardless of blood rarely being shed.

Those are the three cage matches that are most used by the WWE and the generic cage match is evidently used globally with many promotions. The most common variable that these three cages matches have is the fan fallowing that they have. Fans would buy a PPV  just to see a Hell in the Cell match or tune in to an episode of Raw if a cage match is scheduled.

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