The Pound-for-Pound King of MMA Is?: UFC in Need of Open Weight Division

Tyson HarrisCorrespondent ISeptember 2, 2008

Can speed and agility overcome power and endurance? Can wit or strategy overcome size or weight? Can a guy who weighs 155 pounds be as powerful as a 200-plus-pounder?

Is it possible to beat a powerful fighter if you are nowhere near as strong as him? Does Urijah Faber have a major disadvantage against a guy like Kimbo Slice? Does BJ Penn stand a chance against Brock Lesnar? Should there be a "Super Fight" between Anderson Silva and Fedor Emelianenko to see who is the pound-for-pound best, and, if so, could Silva beat Fedor without fighting at his natural weight? Should there be an MMA division where a fighter has the choice to fight at whatever weight he or she is comfortable?

Can you really establish the pound-for-pound best fighter in the world without an open weight division?

These are questions that come to mind when I wonder who the pound-for-pound best fighter in the world is. I, for one, consider all these questions when I think of who really is the best fighter out there.

Some say size doesn't matter—most think size does—why is it that the little guy always seem to be underestimated? I believe it is a fact that some people's bodies can not gain huge amounts of weight without it taking a toll on their speed, mobility, flexibility, and technique.

There are smaller people out there that have bigtime power. There are Olympic power-lifters at 123 pounds that lift up to 672 pounds; these men are packing power and could probably knock out someone 200 pounds or more with ease if they had the proper attributes and training to complement that strength.

Some people say Bruce Lee had the power of a man three times his size; I am not going to get into if he would last in the UFC or not, that is an un-answerable question that holds room for speculation (although it is a shame we can not find out for sure how he would do, but that is also something that brings this topic to mind).

I, for one, have witnessed many small-statured men destroy huge men in street fights, and I have also seen skilled light fighters beat skilled heavy fighters. I ask can you really determine who the best pound-for-pound fighter in the world is with out an open weight division, and should fighters have the option to fight in a division that allows you to fight at what ever weight you are most comfortable considering the risks or stereotypes?

Do fighters deserve the choice to fight open weight? Also, a question of equal importance: Do we the fans deserve a clear answer to who really is the pound-for-pound best fighter in the world instead of so-called "expert" or analysts' opinions?

We can all continue to listen to analysts tell us who is what, but, let's face it, even the experts are wrong sometimes when speculating.

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