Scotland Rugby: Cameras In Teams Changing Rooms Going Too Far

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Scotland Rugby: Cameras In Teams Changing Rooms Going Too Far
Phil Walter/Getty Images

Has anybody ever heard of privacy?

Cameras in sporting teams changing rooms is going too far. If players can't even go into their own changing rooms to show their frustration or elation without being watched by the whole world, where can they do it?

When cameras were put in the changing rooms during the Ashes series in the 2010- 2011 season, former Australian cricketers opposed the idea immediately. When a batsman gets out to a bad shot or a bad bowling delivery, they hold on to their frustration until they're out of the public eyes and into the privacy of their own dressing rooms.

Now, with cameras in dressing rooms, unless they want public outrage about their behaviour and being bad role models if they throw their bats or kick indoors (which you read in autobiographies), they have to keep a lid on their frustration.

Let's hope cameras don't occur in cricketing dressing rooms more often in future.

In New Zealand, cameras are being brought in to the changing sheds during the Super 15, and the IRB are pushing to use them during the Rugby World Cup this year.

What player wants to see themselves getting torn into by the coach in front of the World?

None.

This is what changing rooms are for—to prepare them for games. To vent frustration or elation. At halftime, the coaches are going to let rip at how their team or players are playing if they are not playing well.

But it should all remain private just for the people in those rooms, not for everyone else at home.

Scotland has already opposed to the cameras being placed in the changing room during the RWC due to the invasion of privacy. If one or two teams don't want the cameras, do their wishes get ignored and the cameras are used in the changing rooms anyway? How does it work?

Players need to feel comfortable in their own PRIVATE changing rooms.

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