A-Rod: Already In My Hall Of Fame

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A-Rod: Already In My Hall Of Fame
Nick Laham/Getty Images

He wears high socks because they look cool.  He walks to the plate with that look of determination.  He has a patented tap of home plate with his bat and a few slow practice swings.  He stares down the pitcher with a wad of chewing gum in his mouth.  He lifts his front leg up, swings his trademark black bat into the air, plants his foot back down as the ball literally shoots off the bat like a bullet.  He is Alex Rodriguez.

He wears high socks under his black work pants.  He clutches his number thirteen necklace during times of frustration.  He looks at his New York insignia tattoo with a number thirteen under it for encouragement.  He wakes up everyday determined to knock life out of the ballpark.  He is Micheal Robinson.

While Rodriguez is no stranger to drama off the field, his passion on the field sets him apart from all the rest. 

Like many, I have been a fan of baseball since I was a little kid.  Not realizing how important the game would be to me in the future.  Today, it is very important to me.

Let's face it, we all have problems and issues in life to deal with.  I've had my share of them through the years.  I don't look for excuses, I don't need help.  I just want to pick my self up and try harder the next time.

Giving up baseball before I went into High School was the worst decision I could ever make.  I don't feel sorry for myself, it is my fault and my fault only.  If I wanted to play the game bad enough then I would of tried harder.

I guess my size didn't help me and has led me towards the retail life I life now and most likely will live for a while.

Not having a family by my side when I need them the most can be a let down, and not having a father take me to a baseball game doesn't help either.

Through all of the headaches in life.  I have found a release that calms me down and relaxes me.

I have backed and cheered for Alex when no one else would.  I look pass all of the drama and realize that he is something special. 

The steroid admission rocked me last year, I will admit.  But how he bounced back from that and the hip surgery, only made me a bigger fan of his then I was before.  The home run in Baltimore, the clutch plays in the playoffs to earn a Championship.  It was an amazing year.  Fairy tale like in my book.

There is no doubt in my mind that 2009 will never be forgotten and will always be close to my heart. 

What Rodriguez did that year only assured me what I already knew, that you can do anything you set your mind to, no matter what anyone tells you.

I keep a quote on my desk that I look at everyday, Rodriguez said, "Always follow your dreams, don't let anyone tell you that you can't be something."

Look, I am no different then any other fan of baseball.  I am not obsessed with Rodriguez by any means.  I believe that this is called something else.  Respect.

He will likely never know, but everyday he takes the field and gives it his all reminds me that no matter what I am doing in life, to do the best I can at it.  He has helped me get through a lot of trials in my life.

The memories I have watching him play are far from over.  He is 17 home runs away from 600 and who knows, maybe he can reach that famous number of 762.  Regardless of what happens between now and the end of his career, I am proud to be a fan of his.

I hope that the "clean years" after his admission is enough to prove to the baseball writers that he belongs in the Hall Of Fame, but even if he doesn't make it, I won't mind.

Because how I feel about him is the only thing that is going to matter to me at the end of the day.

Say what you will about the man known as "A-Rod", but take a long look at his baseball game, because he is of a rare breed of talent and has change my outlook on life.

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