U.S. Olympic Stars Popularizes Games, but Chad Hedrick Hits Downside

Use your ← → (arrow) keys to browse more stories
U.S. Olympic Stars Popularizes Games, but Chad Hedrick Hits Downside
Jasper Juinen/Getty Images

It’s unfortunate a long-awaited dream was shattered, hindering him from a potential shot at fame and glory.

When an Olympian trains years for the unforeseen, a heartbreaker is unimagined for a real icon expected to leave Vancouver with a medal and exhilarated of the exertion needed to reach a pinnacle in the world-class games.

On a day that tested strength and courage, U.S. speedskater exits empty handed and distraught of faltering during a felicitous moment.

He is, Chad Hedrick, who reacted emotionally after a substandard finish in the men’s long-track speedskating 1,500 meter.

Before he began his chase for gold, he cried in the locker room, and while lacing up his skates he shed tears, too.

In what was his final Winter Games appearance, Hedrick, 32, knew it was the last crack at capturing happiness. But his age revealed when he started off sluggish, finding it laborious to accelerate as quickly as the younger legs.

There wasn’t a point during the race that he obtained agility or a groove to venture in a challenging race, which has became steeper over the last four years.

As we’ve trusted in Team USA, now known as virtuous icons of the Winter Games, once again most of our athletes have popularized the games.

Our country has witnessed the most intense and competitive games in a long time, pleased to see the U.S. claim the most medals overall, including a leading total in gold medals.

It’s sad a triumphant storybook wasn’t a pleasant ending for Hedrick in a week much exaltation uplifted new heights and established persistent memories.

In an unhappy ending, he couldn’t position himself in the company of star skier Lindsey Vonn, famous snowboarder Shaun White, figure skater Evan Lysacek, and teammates Shani Davis and Apolo Ohno.

All of whom emerged as American heroes, invoking effulgence and remembered as the renewal of the Winter Games, making the world believe they’re the most outstanding competitors globally.

The heartbreaking meltdown on the frozen surface, certainly, saddened Hedrick of finishing short to mount worthiness and earn recognition among U.S. icons.

His preparation and obligation to a sport, defined an athlete with tremendous promise and dedication to a sport that he truly unveiled enthusiasm. That wasn’t the scenario for Vonn, when she told reporters about her bruised shin and was uncertain if she’d compete, while viewed as a Cover Girl model.

Her photos appeared in the latest Sports Illustrated’s swimsuit issue, grasping our attention when she was expected to win all five of her Alpine events, but raced brilliantly in the super-combined claiming a gold medal.

Yesterday, she managed to win bronze in the Super G, losing almost a half-second to lose out on gold. Then, the unforeseen win of men’s figure skating came about when the unexpected Evan Lysacek claimed Olympic gold to upset Russia.

White defied gravity with his innovation of never-before-seen tricks, developing a style the snowboarders across the country couldn’t challenge.

Davis crossed the finish line, to conquer gold in the 1000-meter forcing the stands to erupt, and become the second most decorated U.S. man in Olympic speed skating. His teammate Ohno, a lucky speed skater who skated by two Korean skaters, Lee Ho-Suk and Sung Si-Bak after a collision caused a crash on the final turn allowing Ohno to take silver in the men’s 1500-meter race becoming the first most decorated U.S. athlete as well.

On this day, Ohno finished as the most decorated U.S. Winter Olympian in history and Davis added a silver medal Saturday evening, but Hedrick was a high-profile athlete expected to dazzle.

It was supposed to be an uphill battle between him and Davis. More surprisingly, Mark Tuitert shocked our nation by claiming the gold medal, the Dutch star no one had in mind until it actually happened.

The surreal sequence is ending considerable on the downside. He saw aspiration languish, but most U.S. athletes saw gladness. He expressed an anguish psyche, but most U.S. athletes expressed laugher and good humor, proud of winning a medal.

The scoreboard read mishap, and the scoreboard wasn’t clear as to whether Hedrick was ranked third in the world in an event demanding much speed, stamina and equilibrium.

Nearly, he wasn’t the skater we once knew, a four-time Olympic medalist. This time, it was Hedrick competing as if it merely was his first Winter Games appearance, more indolent and lethargic than in prior games.

And this time, he wasn’t unbeatable, but vulnerable of faltering at a moment when he controlled his own destiny, aiming to leave the games on gratifying terms.

From his poor performance to what could be his final good bye, Hedrick under duress was shocking, even stunning the U.S. citizens accustomed to the sterling leverage he had whenever skating in front of a convincing audience.

For years, he has been a most-watched skater in his sport, a traditional star in speed skating. Rather awkwardly of late, he inveigled a large population in America to watch his compelling finishes without collapsing.

But considering that he’ll retire, Hedrick doesn’t have what it take to slice and dash through ice, conquering a medal for his ambitious and zest to rapidly race on skates.

As it turned out, fellow American and rival Davis finished second to claim silver, while Hedrick admitted to his failures who may decide to father his 11-month old daughter, Hadley.

Well, it seems now he could depart the game with a gold, silver and bronze medal, all won in the Turin Games. From this point on, he bares his soul and appreciates what he has accomplished as an Olympian.

That’s not bad at all.

 

Load More Stories

Follow B/R on Facebook