The Atlanta Braves' X-Factors: Troy Glaus

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The Atlanta Braves' X-Factors: Troy Glaus

Click here to see Derek Lowe's X-Factor profile.

Back in his Angel days, Troy Glaus was one of the preeminent power hitters in all of baseball.

The Halos could count on 30-50 homers when Mt. Glaus was healthy.

That success even leaked into his season in Arizona and his first season in Toronto, years in which he belted 37 and 38 homers, respectively.

Since then, though, he's looked a little less like a mountain and more like a steep hill.

Since that last 35+ homer season in 2007, Glaus has managed season homer totals of 20, 27, and zero (playing 115, 151, and 14 games...the first in Toronto and the latter two coming under the Gateway Arch out in St. Louis).

Now, 20 and 27 homers (we're going to ignore the zero because of the number of games played) aren't too much to sneeze at.

And those 20 did come in 115 games...that can't be understated.

But he obviously isn't what he once was.

Obviously, Frank Wren is expecting something closer to Glaus' former norm, though.

He said days before signing Glaus that he thought that the Braves were in position to sign an "run-producer."

Since we haven't heard anything since (and this is going to be a "No s$%& Sherlock moment"), I think we can assume that he meant Glaus.

Now, Wren's definition of a run-producer may differ from mine...but when I think of that term, I think 25-30 homers and 100 or more RBI.

And, really, that's not too much of a stretch for Glaus who has been able to match that in most seasons in which he's been healthy.

The only question that comes up is his health...and it's a pretty fair sized question mark.

But my gut tells me not to worry too much.

After all, he did come back at the end of the season last year to provide two RBI and five hits (two doubles) for the NL Central Champion Cardinals.

That's not a big sample size by any stretch of the imagination, but he obviously took his time in coming back and is said to be good-to-go.

And if you want to be picky, you can say that first base is going to be iffy for him.

But, he was a pretty solid defender over at the hot corner and we've seen plenty of guys (see Jorge Cantu...went from 2B to 3B to 1B) make pretty fair shifts across the diamond...so I'm not too worried about that.

So, what should the Atlanta Braves and their fans (us) be expecting?

Well, I can tell you that you can't expect anything like his 2000 in which he hit .284 and bopped 47 homers (both career highs as a 22-year-old).

But, something in line with his 2008, 27 homers with a .270 average and 104 Ks in 151 games, is gettable.

If I'm putting money on it, I'm saying .268 with 26 homers and about 120Ks (that's closer to his 147 K average for a season than '08, which was a bot of an anomaly) in 140+ games.

I figure that if Eric Hinske's used enough to spare him from two and three straight weeks of work that he can maintain his health for most of to all of the season.

And if he can do that, then you have to figure that between Chipper, McCann, Escobar, and the topic of discussion, the Braves' lineup will have enough pop to win a few more games for the pitching staff.

He won't be a world beater...but I think his $2 million salary will end up looking a little like a bargain when 2010 comes to an end.

You've just gotta have faith (yeah, that's exactly where this is going) in this dude...



...and Eric Hinske, who's next up in this series.

(And no, I didn't ever think that George Michael would be in one of my articles, either.)

 

(Photo Credit: http://assets.sbnation.com/assets/265188/presser-glaus_medium.JPG)

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