Texas QB Colt McCoy Vs. Texas A&M QB Jerrod Johnson: Inside The Numbers

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Texas QB Colt McCoy Vs. Texas A&M QB Jerrod Johnson: Inside The Numbers
Aaron M. Sprecher/Getty Images

The picture above is Texas A&M QB Jerrod Johnson running into the 2010 preseason Heisman list. That being said, you could make the case for his 2009 consideration.

I'm here to tell you that despite what people think, the Heisman is much more than a numbers game.

If so, a different Big 12 QB would have been invited to New York City. In fact, if I were a Kansas fan I'd be writing the same case for Todd Reesing.

I found it strange that Johnson's name never came up in the Heisman candidacy considering the numbers he was putting up. Johnson averaged 306 total yards per game (ranks sixth nationally), had 36 total touchdowns compared to only six interceptions.

Compare that to Colt McCoy's numbers of 296 total yards per game, 30 total touchdowns and 12 interceptions, and you might think something was afoot.

But let's be honest, I'm a realist and I realize that McCoy is more deserving of the award because he's on the better team and had more success in the win column.

However that, in and of itself, should breed more reasons for Johnson's case because he is able to have better numbers on a worse team.

You might make the case that because the Aggies had such a bad year by their standards, Johnson should be faulted for that. I'd argue against your point because the defense was horrible all year long, something he can't control.

Colt McCoy has the luxury of being bailed out by his top ten ranked defense when he has bad games, such as the Oklahoma and Nebraska games. McCoy also played poorly against Texas Tech, but came through when it mattered.

Johnson, on the other hand, only had two bad games against Oklahoma and Kansas State. Had the Aggies not laid an egg in Manhattan that day, I would not be writing this article making his caseā€”he would have made it himself.

Half on Johnson interceptions on the season came in that game, and the Aggies had their most embarrassing loss to a bad team, 62-14.

It's rather humorous that I'm sitting here writing this, considering McCoy already out-dueled Johnson in their Thanksgiving night matchup. The two put on a show in front of the entire nation, but McCoy ended up with the better night.

The 88 points and the 1100 yards were the most in the history of the rivalry.

McCoy stamped his ticket to New York with 479 total yards and five touchdowns with no interceptions. Johnson was not far behind with 439 total yards and four touchdowns.

The difference in the game can be found in Johnson's lone interception, as well as a special teams breakdown that stretched the lead to 10 late in the fourth quarter after the Aggies had just cut the lead to three.

Despite the discrepancy in favor of McCoy's numbers, Johnson's day should be considered more impressive due to the fact that nobody had torched Texas' defense like that all year.

A&M scored 39 points; Texas' defense allowed only 15 points per game this year.

Look, I'm not crying that Johnson got snubbed or whatever you may be thinking. I'm just lining up the numbers and proving that team success has a lot more to do with the individual award than people think.

If the Heisman is supposed to go to the best player in college football, shouldn't we ignore team success?

Only in a perfect world.

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