Why Seneca Wallace Should Be the Seahawks' Long-Term QB

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Why Seneca Wallace Should Be the Seahawks' Long-Term QB
(Photo by Andy Lyons/Getty Images)

Matt Hasselbeck, Charlie Frye, Mike Teel, David Greene, and Seneca Wallace: All five of these players have been or still are quarterbacks for the Seattle Seahawks.

Frye lasted one season and was not re-signed. Greene was a bust draft pick in 2005 and never made it with the Seahawks.

Wallace is in the top three in terms of backup quarterbacks in the NFL and has great starting potential. Hasselbeck is the only quarterback in Seahawks history to lead them to the Super Bowl.

If you want to graph that, there are going to be three names on that 0.0 list and two names on that 9.5-plus scale.

Hasselbeck has missed at least four games in two of the last three seasons, and every time the Seahawks have turned to their backup QB Wallace to carry them through it.

Wallace, drafted in the fourth round (110th overall) in the 2003 NFL draft, has been a backup his entire seven-year career with the Seahawks.

He's had his starts, but only when Hasselbeck was injured or because he was playing so poorly.

It's understandable when you watch Wallace play why the Seahawks have kept him for so long and still have the utmost trust in Wallace to lead the way and not have to rush back Hasselbeck.

In his career Wallace has thrown 25 TDs and 14 INTs while posting an 83 career quarterback rating.

Now even though it is hard to compare Matt Hasselbeck and Seneca Wallace, both quarterbacks have very close QB ratings, completion percentage, and average yards per throw.

This season Wallace has taken a great step in becoming a pocket QB and making the right decisions with the football under pressure.

This season Wallace has thrown for 645 yards, three TDs, two INTs, and an 82 quarterback rating. In his two starts this season Wallace has attempted 44 and 45 passes, which is a career high.

The only problems to have emerged for Wallace this season are a lack of talent on the offensive line and sometimes throwing risky balls, but he has been getting better each week.

in both starts this season Wallace has had a receiver go over 100 yards (Nate Burleson and T.J. Houshmandzadeh), which is a good sign for the Seahawks.

Now a lot of people will criticize Wallace's height at 5'11" and say he is at a disadvantage in the pocket, so he has to use his legs to get outside the pocket and be able to be a better QB that way.

Well, Saints QB Drew Brees is 6'0", which is only an inch taller than Wallace, yet no one criticizes his height.

As of now the Seahawks are 1-3, and once they start getting some help on the offensive line, Seneca Wallace could be the Seahawks' current and long-term solution at quarterback.

At least it would make sense this season with the Seahawks struggling on defense and having a plethora of injuries on both sides of the ball.

Give Wallace a healthy offensive line, a decent running game, and a great defense, and then Wallace can take this team to where they know they can go.

Now if Wallace doesn't do so well and the Seahawks decide to draft a top rookie QB like Sam Bradford or Colt McCoy, they would have nothing to lose.

Either way, the Seahawks can't lose. If Wallace does well, then the Seahawks most likely will make the playoffs. If he does poorly, then the Seahawks can go ahead and draft their future starting QB in the 2010 draft.

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