Boxing logoBoxing

Floyd Mayweather Put Himself To More Ridicule After Number1/NumeroUno

LAS VEGAS - SEPTEMBER 16:  Boxer Floyd Mayweather Jr. appears during the final news conference for his bout against Juan Manuel Marquez at the MGM Grand Hotel/Casino September 16, 2009 in Las Vegas, Nevada. The two will fight at the MGM Grand Garden Arena on September 19 in Las Vegas.  (Photo by Ethan Miller/Getty Images)
victorCorrespondent ISeptember 22, 2009

Mr. Controversy is definitely back.

Floyd "Money" Mayweather, Jr. is officially back in boxing after a year and a half hiatus from the sport by garnering another win on his unblemished record which now stands at 40-0-0.

After 12 rounds of slick boxing with yet another counter-puncher in Mexico's Juan Manuel Marquez, Mayweather came out triumphant, landing him just as soon on the Ring Magazine's elite Pound for Pound Ratings at Number 2.

The bout was billed as "Number1/NumeroUno", and was intended to be a pad to launch Mayweather back into the spotlight again. It did live up to its intentions, and most eyes and ears on Mayweather again, from his most avid followers, to his most keen critics.

On the positive side, Mayweather displayed a boxer who seems to not have "retired" at all. It's still all there - the defense, the offense, the ring generalship; all in all displaying the wide array of skills of a great boxer. 

On even grounds, nobody would have noticed anything on his performance because over-all, it's all him, all expected since day one. Great as a fighter as Marquez is, nobody really expected him to win over Mayweather, save for the "hope" that he's got what it takes to " possibly" upset Mayweather.

Not until the actual weigh in.

Weight's always an issue. And an outcome of a fight can depend on weight alone. Take for example the recent Nonito Donaire Vs. Rafael Concepcion bout.

Marquez, who is a natural super featherweight with only two bouts on the lightweight division, bulked himself up but still came up 2 pounds short for the 144 pounds catch weight.

Mayweather on the other hand, came down but still weighed in 2 pounds heavier than the contract catch weight.

On the weigh-in night alone, Mayweather and Marquez have a 4 pound difference between them. Being the naturally bigger man, Mayweather must have added 8 to 10 pounds more.

Marquez on the other hand, since he came up short, naturally is not expected to have added as much weight. It is notable that Mayweather refused to step into the scales again before the fight.

It is therefore erratic to say that the weight difference between the two is a mere 4 pounds.

The bout was not as one-sided as most think. Marquez had his moments and was landing clean shots at Mayweather's face every now and then. But they're hardly noticeable. One, Mayweather can roll with the punches, and two, he hardly feels them.

If Marquez was the most skillful between the two, I still doubt if he can ever drop Mayweather.

Since day 1, a lot of this bout's critics have claimed that Marquez was poised to lose in this bout. In terms of skills alone, Marquez will find it hard to level up to Mayweather. It's all going to be a walk in the park for Mayweather.

Does he have to walk Marquez park with so much excess protection on?

By not making it to the contract catch weight, Mayweather put himself in a No Win - All Lose Situation.

By making the fight go the distance, he's subject to ridicule that despite having all the advantages in the world, he wasn't able to finish off Marquez.

If he followed up on his second round knockout on Marquez and finished him off right there and then, it would be an over-kill. It wouldn't be a Pacquiao-Hatton over-kill since it was staged on even grounds, but imagine Goliath defeating David, and cutting off his head with his great big sword.

Mr. Controversy is definitely back. Question remains who he'll fight next.

Donaire beware.

Where can I comment?

Stay on your game

Latest news, insights, and forecasts on your teams across leagues.

Choose Teams
Get it on the App StoreGet it on Google Play

Real-time news for your teams right on your mobile device.

Download
Copyright © 2017 Bleacher Report, Inc. Turner Broadcasting System, Inc. All Rights Reserved. BleacherReport.com is part of Bleacher Report – Turner Sports Network, part of the Turner Sports and Entertainment Network. Certain photos copyright © 2017 Getty Images. Any commercial use or distribution without the express written consent of Getty Images is strictly prohibited. AdChoices