San Francisco Giants: What A Day To Be a Giant's Fan... (8/7/09)

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San Francisco Giants: What A Day To Be a Giant's Fan... (8/7/09)

"What a day to be a Giants fan." That's something that hasn't been said for a few years. Since Bonds' departure from the city by the bay, Giants fans have really had nothing to get excited about.

After season's of 38 year-old Marquis Grissom batting clean-up for us; and after waiting... and waiting... and waiting for Noah Lowry to somehow magically turn into Sandy Koufax, we finally got a real team on our hands. A team we can genuinely get behind (not in that sense you sick bastard).

This can be attributed to 3 young men who has this young man seeing championships in the near future.

Fist we got the "Kung-Fu Panda" Pablo Sandoval batting 3rd and manning 3rd. This guy was tearing it up in the minors and hasn't stopped since his call-up late last season. This is essentially his rookie year and he is already challenging for the batting title (.327). And with 17 homers, he is bringing pop from both sides of the plate to a line-up that was starving for power. He is also fielding 3rd base better than any of us thought the converted catcher could ever field. Did I mention he is 22, and that he is 3 years away from his prime?

Then we got Matt Cain, the workhorse of the rotation. Up until this season, it seemed like Cain couldn't trade his mother for a couple runs of run support. He earned the title of "bad luck pitcher" which isn't good for a young rookie's confidence. But he has continued to fight, well pitch, through his early career woes to post decent peripheral numbers.

And this season it seems like the Giants won't get runs for anyone but Cain (ask Zito, he'll tell you all about it). Cain leads the National League with 12 wins and seems to only be competing with his partner in crime, Tim Lincecum, for the NL Cy Young Award this season.

Speaking of the 25-year-old Tim Lincecum a.k.a, Timmy-K, The Kid, The Freak, The Franchise, or whatever you would like to call him.

He is 5'11", 170 pounds, looks like he is 16, has hair like a woman, and looks like someone Ellen DeGeneres would be attracted to; not your proto-typical "ace". But hes got a 97 mph fastball with movement, a 12-6 curveball that drops off the table, a good slider, and his best pitch his circle change-up.

What is scary is that he is only going to get better from here on out. The man has brought life to this San Francisco ball club that was running on life support the last few seasons.

First he led the league in strikeouts in 2008, making 265 batters walk back to the dugout talking to their bats. On top of that he won the Cy Young Award (Best pitcher overall) in his rookie season, which is no feat to laugh at. He has single-handedly masked ugly front office faux pas' *cough* Barry Zito *cough* made by management. And he is the conductor on the gravy train that is potentially headed for the 2009 playoffs. Anyone who remotely pays attention to baseball understands that the Giants have a special player in Tim Lincecum.

So with these rising stars helping the Giants' organization return to relevance. Plus all the promising young talent in their farm system such as: Buster Posey, Angel Villalona, and Madison Bumgarner. Combined with the trading deadline additions of Freddy Sanchez and Ryan Garko (which were questionable, but trades nonetheless). This team is showing that they want to win, and they want to win right now.

And even if they fall short of a playoff spot this season, they have put themselves in a position to succeed for years to come. Maybe I am just being too optimistic. But I bet the Yankees felt optimistic when they acquired Babe Ruth in 1919 for $100,000 and a bag of chips, and look at how that turned out. I haven't said this in a good while, but what a day to be a Giants fan.

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