Golf Records Most Likely to Fall in 2015

Mike DudurichContributor IJanuary 22, 2015

Golf Records Most Likely to Fall in 2015

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    Will Tiger Woods be healthy enough in 2015 to topple a pair of Sam Snead records?
    Will Tiger Woods be healthy enough in 2015 to topple a pair of Sam Snead records?Scott Halleran/Getty Images

    It has been said that records are made to be broken.

    Jack Nicklaus' mark of 18 major championships might be the exception to that adage, but everything else out there certainly can and will be broken.

    Sam Snead's marks of the most wins in the same event and most career PGA Tour wins could well be broken this year, and by the same guy, Tiger Woods.

    Here's a list of a half-dozen records that have a chance to go down in 2015. 

Longest Drive

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    Bubba Watson and his pink driver can propel golf balls great distances.
    Bubba Watson and his pink driver can propel golf balls great distances.Andy Lyons/Getty Images

    Bubba Watson recorded the longest drive on the PGA Tour last year, a 424-yard blast on Firestone Country Club's par-five 16th hole.

    Nicolas Colsaerts established a European Tour long-drive mark with a 447-yard bomb that left him a with a gap wedge into the green on the 613-yard 18th at Celtic Manor.

    The longest-ever drive still belongs to Mike Austin, who rocketed a drive 515 yards in the 1974 U.S. National Senior Open Championship in Las Vegas. 

    With the distances today's balls are flying and the clubhead speed today's players create, it would not come as a surprise if guys like Watson, Jimmy Walker or Jordan Spieth get hot, dry conditions on a particular day, launch a drive that gets a good bounce and travels to a new record distance.

Lowest 18-Hole Round

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    Rookie Justin Thomas is a guy who can go really, really low.
    Rookie Justin Thomas is a guy who can go really, really low.Hugh Gentry/Associated Press

    The number 59 has always been magic in golf because it's the lowest round ever shot in a PGA Tour event.

    It's been done just six times: Al Geiberger (1977), Chip Beck (1991), David Duval (1999), Paul Goydos (2010), Stuart Appleby (2010) and Jim Furyk (2013).

    All were brilliant rounds with plenty of birdies and bogeys being a rarity. They were very special days for those golfers, although Geiberger, Duval and Appleby were the only ones to win the tournaments in which they shot 59.

    It just makes sense with the number of quality players on the tour each week that 59 is going to be eclipsed soon. The elite players are extremely capable, and if one of them gets off to a quick start, it can be done.

    How's this for an under-the-radar sort of pick: rookie Justin Thomas.

Lowest Round in a Major Championship

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    Johnny Miller shows off the form that allowed him to shoot 63 at Oakmont.
    Johnny Miller shows off the form that allowed him to shoot 63 at Oakmont.John Smierciak/Associated Press

    The lowest round ever recorded in a major championship, 63, was shot for the first time in 1973, and it might be the most well remembered of the 26 times it's been done.

    Johnny Miller torched Oakmont Country Club in the final round of the U.S. Open in '73 and received great notoriety for doing so. But since then, 25 other players have matched that score, and there's a good chance someone will eclipse that mark in 2015.

    That number has been shot twice at St. Andrews, site of this year's British Open, and if the weather cooperates, it could be done again. It's also been done twice at Augusta National Golf Club, the annual site of the Masters.

    Rory McIlroy is certainly good enough to go lower; he shot 63 at St. Andrews in 2010.

    Other likely candidates are the usual suspects: Rickie Fowler, Jordan Spieth, Adam Scott and even Bubba Watson if he gets hot on one of the days his head is on straight.

Most Victories in Single Event

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    Sam Snead's silky smooth swing and his longevity were remarkable.
    Sam Snead's silky smooth swing and his longevity were remarkable.Stephen Munday/Getty Images

    Sam Snead, one of the greatest players in the history of golf, won the Greensboro Open eight times over the course of 27 years.

    That's the most times a player has won a single event.

    But guess who is knocking on the door to take over sole possession of that record?

    Tiger Woods.

    He's won the Arnold Palmer Bay Hill Classic and the World Golf Championship-Bridgestone Invitational eight times as well.

    And beyond that, he's won the Farmers Insurance Open and WGC-Cadillac Championship seven times.

    Woods has made those events his personal annuity, and if he's healthy in 2015, don't be surprised if he gets his ninth victory at least once this year.

All-Time Victories

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    Sam Snead's 82 victories on the PGA Tour has stood as record for a long time.
    Sam Snead's 82 victories on the PGA Tour has stood as record for a long time.Craig Jones/Getty Images

    The last of Sam Snead's 82 PGA Tour victories came in 1965 at the Greensboro Open. It just happened to be the eighth time the Virginia native won that event. Both his total number of victories and the eight wins at the same event are records.

    And, just like the most victories in an event, Tiger Woods could topple the career wins total this year.

    Woods sits at 79 victories, and if his health allows him to be anywhere close to what he was in 2013 when he won five times, he could easily get three or four wins in 2015.

    Woods has always been at his best when his detractors were discounting his chances, and that's the scenario he faces once his 2015 season gets underway next week at the Phoenix Open.

Fewest Putts for Four Rounds

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    David Frost was not only a good ball-striker, but he was a good putter as well.
    David Frost was not only a good ball-striker, but he was a good putter as well.Stuart Franklin/Getty Images

    Imagine what David Frost did in 2005 when he needed just 92 putts to get around Harbour Town Golf Links in Hilton Head.

    That total averages out to 24 putts per round, which is a ridiculous number considering the complexities of those greens at Harbour Town.

    The guys on the PGA Tour are coming up with more and more creative ways to to get up and down from around the greens, making for a lot of one-putt greens. 

    We're seeing better putting in this area, where guys are running off streaks like Jimmy Walker did on Saturday at the Sony Open. He had 11 consecutive one-putt greens.

    Walker would be a good choice to break that record.