2009 NFP scouting series: North Carolina State

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2009 NFP scouting series: North Carolina State
(Photo by Kevin C. Cox/Getty Images)

 

This summer, the National Football Post is breaking down every team in the Football Bowl Subdivision (formerly known as Division I-A) to identify players who might warrant interest from NFL teams in the 2010 draft.

 

After a slow start to the 2008 season, the North Carolina State Wolfpack finished the year with four consecutive wins in the ACC and look poised for bigger and better things this season.

 

Offense

Jamell Eugene: No. 29, RB, 5'9", 196

An undersized back who displays natural instincts as a runner. Does a nice job making quick, decisive reads at the line of scrimmage, lowing his pad level, and taking what the defense gives him.

Showcases good balance and footwork when asked to change directions and knows how to make a man miss in space. However, he lacks burst out of his breaks and isn’t much of a threat in the open field. Plays at one speed and is considered more quick than fast.

Does a nice job breaking tackles for his size, but lacks the power to carry the load inside.

Impression: Displays some natural running ability, but doesn’t possess the speed or power to offer much upside at the next level.

 

Ted Larsen: No. 58, OC, 6'2", 300

A flexible lineman who does a nice job dropping his pad level on contact and getting his hands under defenders. Keeps his base low when sliding laterally and looks natural when asked to redirect in pass protection.

Lacks elite quickness in space, but does a nice job working his hands and feet through contact and staying on blocks off his shoulder. Exhibits a smooth, compact punch and recoils quickly after striking his target.

Fires off the ball quickly in the run game and can create a bit of an initial surge up front. Works his legs hard through contact, but lacks natural power in his base. Has a tendency to get overextended and lose his balance when trying to finish blocks and is often shed after his initial surge.

Impression: Isn’t an elite size/speed athlete, but is technically sound and has the makings of a possible starter at the next level.

 

Jeraill McCuller: No. 50, OT, 6'7", 335

A massive right tackle prospect who carries his weight well and looks coordinated off the ball. Exhibits a smooth kick-step and uses his length to get into defensive linemen quickly on the outside. Displays good athleticism for his size and makes it tough for opposing pass rushers to turn the corner on him. Is patient in pass protection and does a nice job keeping his base down, head up, and not lunging into blocks.

However, he struggles redirecting in space and isn’t crisp with his footwork. Has a tendency to get elongated in his lower half and isn’t real sudden when asked to change directions.

Lacks ideal hand placement and struggles staying on block; looks content to simply steer opposing linemen away from the play. Isn’t as powerful as his frame would indicate and can be overwhelmed at the point of attack by the bull-rush.

Impression: Needs to get stronger in his base, but possesses some intriguing quickness off the snap and looks like a draftable right tackle prospect at the next level.


Defense

Willie Young: No. 97, DE/OLB, 6'5", 250

A long-armed athlete with a thin base who isn’t real effective at the point of attack. Lacks power in his lower half and can be sealed away from the ball easily on the outside. Isn’t real instinctive and struggles using his hands to keep opposing linemen from getting into his legs; consistently ends up on the ground.

Has a big first step off the snap, but isn’t overly explosive and isn’t a consistent threat to reach the corner. Lacks power on contact and doesn’t generate much push on his bull-rush. Does a nice job dropping his pad level when he flattens out toward the corner, but lacks the balance to fight through contact and is consistently pushed past the pocket.

Displays some short-area quickness when rushing the passer, and his combination of length and lateral mobility make him tough to stay in front of. However, he gets too high and leggy when trying to change directions and lacks the burst to quickly close on the play once he gains a step. Has a questionable motor and looks lazy when his initial surge gets stalled.

Impression: A tall, lanky defender who lacks the power and explosion to be effective as a 4-3 defensive end at the next level. Doesn’t look like a 3-4 OLB, either.

 

Alan-Michael Cash: No. 49, DT, 6'1", 296

Lacks the size and girth to handle the double-team inside and is consistently sealed away from the play with any kind of additional attention. Rarely takes a positive first step up the field and is slow to get on top of opposing linemen.

Has a tendency to get way too high off the ball and struggles keeping his pad level down when asked to change directions. Lacks some timing and coordination with his club move and uses it more as a way to keep linemen off his frame than to shed blocks.

Isn’t much of a factor on slide-down blocks and is consistently washed away from the play. Doesn’t play with the type of natural leverage his frame would indicate and lacks the length to disengage from blocks in all areas of the game.

Impression: Doesn’t possess the type of skill set or size to warrant much attention from NFL scouts.

 

Nate Irving: No. 56, OLB, 6'1", 235

A physical, wrap-up tackler who possesses impressive lower-body strength and drives his legs through contact. Exhibits a good first step, but displays only average range in pursuit. However, he reads and reacts quickly to the play and is consistently around the football.

Does a great job playing with leverage when taking on linemen in the hole and holding his ground at the point of attack. Is consistently walking offensive linemen toward the play and uses his hands well to shed blocks and get after the ball. Plays the piano well down the line and keeps himself clean when shuffling through traffic.

Showcases fluid footwork in his drop and does a nice job keeping his feet under him and quickly redirecting out of his breaks. However, he has a tendency to lose track of receivers behind him and needs to do a better job feeling out his surroundings in zone coverage.

Impression: A physical outside linebacker who knows how to win at the point of attack and consistently make plays on the ball. Has the makings of a starting inside or outside linebacker at the next level.

 

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