2009 NFP Scouting Series: Texas

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2009 NFP Scouting Series: Texas
(Photo by Ronald Martinez/Getty Images)

 

This summer, the National Football Post is breaking down every team in the Football Bowl Subdivision (formerly known as Division I-A) to identify players who might warrant interest from NFL teams in the 2010 draft.

The Texas Longhorns return a plethora of NFL-caliber prospects on both sides of the ball and look poised for another run at a national championship.

Offense

Colt McCoy: No. 12, QB, 6-3, 214

Colt McCoyColt McCoy

An athletic quarterback who has the ability to buy time in the pocket and scramble when plays break down. Makes intelligent decisions in the pass game and does a nice job scanning the entire field and finding his check-down guy underneath. Deciphers information quickly at the line and does a great job finding his hot read. Has the ability to make throws from all angles and is accurate on the move. 

His footwork will need some development since he takes most of his snaps from the shotgun, and even then he has a tendency to get sloppy when throwing underneath. Is late with some throws down the field and lacks the arm strength to fit balls into tight spots. As a result, his passes have a tendency to drift or flutter on him when he tries to overthrow the football.

Impression: An athletic quarterback who is very accurate and decisive in the short/intermediate passing game. Looks like a west coast QB at the next level.

Jordan Shipley: No. 8, WR, 6-0, 190

A shifty receiver who possesses some quickness after the catch and can make a play in space. Lines up predominantly in the slot and has a nice feel working the middle of the field. Plucks the ball well away from his frame and has the hand-eye coordination to adjust to an errant pass. A savvy receiver in the pass game who does a great job working back toward the quarterback and finding soft spots underneath.

Jordan ShipleyJordan Shipley

Gets up to speed quickly and has a slight second gear when asked to get down the field. Possesses the balance to change directions at full speed, but has a tendency to round off his routes. Lacks strength and physicality off the line and isn’t asked to face much press coverage from the slot.

Impression: A slot guy only. Is never going to be a wideout who can beat press coverage and play on the outside at the next level.

Chris Hall: No. 71, C, 6-4, 300

Displays a good first step, but lacks the power in his lower half to drive defenders off the ball. Needs to do a better job gaining inside position and wining initial hand battles on contact. Works hard to stay on blocks in the run game and angle defenders out of the play, but simply doesn’t have the natural power to get any kind of push up front.

Exhibits smooth footwork in the pass game and redirects quickly in space. Displays natural flexibility and does a nice job extending his arms, but is susceptible to the bull-rush and can get rocked backward at the point of attack.Impression: A tall, long center who plays with natural flexibility, but lacks the power to get much of a push vs. NFL defensive tackles.

Charlie Tanner: No. 52, OG, 6-4, 305

Has a wide, flexible base and does a nice job firing off the ball with a low pad level and exploding through his hips in the run game. Possesses the power to drive defenders out of the play and does well keeping his legs moving through contact. Displays good athletic ability in the open field with the body control to reach and/or cut down a moving target.

Lacks the footwork and length to stay on slide-down blocks along the line of scrimmage. Gets a bit overextend at times in the pass game and will loses his balance when trying to be overly physical at the point of attack.

Impression: Looks powerful in the run game and displays good short-area quickness vs. the pass. Is as talented as any other lineman on the Texas offensive line.

Adam Ulatoski: No. 74, OT, 6-8, 305

Displays decent flexibility for his size, but isn’t real explosive out of his stance and struggles getting set quickly in the pass game. Possesses good length and upper body strength on the outside and exhibits the punch to angle defenders past the pocket.

However, he has a tendency to overextend into blocks because he lacks the footwork and balance to redirect and mirror linemen in space. Isn’t real fluid at the second level; struggles breaking down in space and hitting a moving target.

Impression: A right tackle prospect only who lacks the fluidity and footwork to play on the left side in the NFL.

Defense

Lamarr Houston: No. 33, DT, 6-2, 284

An undersized interior lineman who lacks power in his base and is consistently washed out of plays at the point of attack. Comes off the ball low and gets into blockers quickly, but simply doesn’t have the strength to be much of a factor in the run game. Displays good lateral quickness and has the burst to slant across the face of linemen. However, he lacks the body control to plant his foot in the ground and attack up field after he gains a step.

Struggles with his balance and doesn’t display the type of ability to change directions after his initial surge. Doesn’t have the power to fight his way through gaps inside and needs to cleanly fire past lineman off the snap in order to generate any kind of penetration.

Impression: An undersized lineman who lacks the strength and frame to be much of a factor inside inside.

Sergio Kindle Sergio Kindle

Sergio Kindle: No. 2, DE/OLB, 6-4, 242

A muscular, long armed athlete who displays good straight-line speed and can close on the football sideline to sideline. However, he struggles breaking down in space and looks a bit stiff, is more of a straight-line athlete. Does a nice job using his hands and delivers a powerful punch at the point of attack. Redirects well on contact and has the body control to counter off his initial burst when rushing the passer. Looks more natural standing up and rushing out of a two-point stance. Doesn’t display the type of burst or flexibility you would expect from an athlete of this caliber when his hand is on the ground.

Impression: A hybrid pass rusher who looks most effective standing up and attacking off the edge. An ideal 3-4 OLB at the next level.

Roddrick Muckelroy: No. 38, OLB, 6-2, 235

Displays impressive closing burst and gets up to speed quickly, but lacks the body control to break down in space and takes bad angles toward the football. Exhibits good power in his base and does a nice job lowering his pad level and stacking linemen in the hole. However, he doesn’t showcases the coordination or technique to consistently shed the block and make a play on the ball. Isn’t overly fluid in any area of his game and makes most of his plays in pursuit.

Impression: A gifted straight-line athlete who can close on the ball, but doesn’t possess the body control to consistently break down and make the necessary play.

Jared Norton: No. 11, ILB, 6-3, 234

Deon Beasley Deon Beasley

A big, long-armed linebacker who displays good closing speed sideline to sideline and is a physical wrap-up tackler. Lacks ideal instincts at the line and struggles initially finding the football. Has a tendency to either take a false step when asked to read and react inside or completely run himself out of plays by taking a bad angle toward the ball. Struggles breaking down in space and shooting on a potential tackle at the proper time; looks very hesitant and will second-guess himself. Is stiff in space and struggles getting out of his breaks and back up to full speed quickly.

Impression: Has a nice frame with long arms, but isn’t real instinctive and struggles finding the ball inside.

Deon Beasley: No. 7, CB, 5-10, 178

An undersized corner who lacks the size and power to efficiently play bump coverage. Doesn’t possess the burst to make up for a false step and easily allows receivers to get behind him when he tries to jam them off the line. However, he exhibits good awareness and does a nice job locating the ball quickly and boxing out receivers away from the play.

Displays a compact back-pedal and looks comfortable when asked to get in the face of receivers and bail off into his drop. Does a nice job flipping his hips and transitioning down the field.

Needs to do a better job trusting his drop in off-coverage, has a tendency to open his hips up early and will allow himself to drift down the field. Therefore, he struggles gathering his feet and driving on routes in front of him.

Impression: Displays decent footwork in his drop and can flip his hips and run. Looks like a possible sub package slot corner.

Check out the rest of my team breakdowns at Nationalfootballpost.com.

 

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