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Nebraska Football: Who Will Fill Void Left from Monte Harrison Signing with MLB?

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Nebraska Football: Who Will Fill Void Left from Monte Harrison Signing with MLB?
Thearon W. Henderson/Getty Images

Nebraska fans know Monte Harrison chose Major League Baseball over being a dual-threat athlete for the Huskers. What fans want to know now is who will fill the void he left behind.

That player is likely Damore'ea Stringfellow. Transferring from Washington, the wide receiver is definitely a possible replacement for Harrison.

Regardless, Harrison's decision does leave a hole in the 2014 recruiting class. And neither Jariah Tolbert or Glenn Irons look to be the proper replacement from the group of recruits.

That's where Stringfellow comes in. At 6'3" and 225 pounds, he was rated the No. 6 player in California in 2013, per Sean Callahan of Rivals.com. Additionally, he did make a small impact in his time with the Huskies. As a true freshman, Callahan also notes that Stringfellow caught 20 passes for 259 yards and one touchdown.

As for Harrison, his high school football numbers were impressive. Per Huskers.com, he "finished the season with 60 receptions for 1,007 yards, an average of 16.8 yards per catch, and had 13 receiving touchdowns." However, Stringfellow has shown in his time at Washington that he's also capable of racking up the yards.

Stringfellow also matches Harrison in size, even holding a few more pounds over him. Harrison is 6'3" and 200 pounds, per 247Sports.com

But replacing Harrison goes beyond just how the two match up in numbers. For Stringfellow, he brings a lot to the table for the Nebraska receiving corp. For instance, Stringfellow is familiar with Nebraska and former Husker Quincy Enunwa. In fact, he hailed from the same California high school as the wide receiver and former defensive end Eric Martin.

Stringfellow's former high school coach even compared him to Enunwa.

“But String is more experienced than Quincy was,” Pete Duffy told the Omaha World Herald's Sam McKewon. “String was a three-year starter, whereas Quincy was just scratching the surface in his senior year. String was involved in a million 7-on-7 games. His experience level, coming out of high school, was much greater than Quincy’s.”

And Nebraska is just as familiar with Stringfellow. The Huskers recruited the wide receiver out of high school before he chose to play for Washington.

"Fortunately we had the experience of recruiting Damore'ea out of high school and understand what he's about and have a really close relationship with his coach," Nebraska head coach Bo Pelini said during his appearance on The Jim Rome Show. "We pretty much knew what we were getting."

Ultimately, what Pelini and his staff are getting in Stringfellow is a solid replacement for Harrison. It's needed, too.

USA TODAY Sports

Stringfellow will have to sit out the 2014 season as of now, but he will be eligible come 2015. That's perfect timing also. Nebraska will say goodbye to both Kenny Bell and Jamal Turner at the end of this upcoming season, which makes Stringfellow an even bigger added benefit.

And Stringfellow knows the opportunity he has in front of him to make an impact.

"It's a great opportunity as you can see Nebraska produces good receivers like Quincy Enunwa, who actually went to my school and Kenny Bell, who's one of the best receivers in the Big Ten," Stringfellow told Callahan. "It's just up to me now to go there and take full advantage of the opportunity."

Losing Harrison to the MLB was not ideal, but fans knew it was very possible. With his departure, the Huskers will be seeking the best possible replacement for him.

That player will likely be Stringfellow.

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