Life: Nature's Greatest Gift and Why We Take It for Granted.

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Life: Nature's Greatest Gift and Why We Take It for Granted.
(Photo by Marc Feldman/Getty Images)

Life, I realized is not something you gain or lose everyday like money on a casino floor table.

 

Life is earned at birth and lost at death; the course which it takes is the way the owner deems it fit to follow.

 

The question of why we earn our existence is because the humans have rightfully earned their place on this planet by waging a long battle called Evolution, against the environment and other living creatures fighting for survival.

 

The answer of a life well earned is answered by our death, and of what we left behind.

 

Did we leave behind a legacy for other’s to follow?

 

Or

 

Did we leave behind a trail of wrong doings that other’s make example of “How not to lead a life?!”?

 

Or

 

Most of all did we take life or our very own existence for granted?

 

Probably no one else can answer the question of “How well are you leading your life?”

 

There are no instruments or detectors or even a scale to place you on a rank of how good you’re doing.

 

All of us have a lil’ voice to let us know “what we are doing?” and “how well we are doing?”

 

But some of us fail to hear the inner voices’ calling and take the most terrible path to learn the gruesome realities and rules of life.

 

We make ourselves as the objects of struggle and pain, which may or may not lead to good result.

 

So, should we all struggle and learn everything the hard way?

 

No, we have a mind that has evolved for years and revolutionized the way this world is heading.

 

We have tools of better understanding, communication and thinking, that have taken us this far.

And so, we can learn from the failings and successes of our fellow beings of what it means to have lived such lives.

 

Possibly most of us ignore the importance, unless we explore the limits of curiosity by asking.

 

The human child learns a lot by asking “Why?”, and that is what separates thinkers from the rest, when their curiosity turns into a habit.

 

If this still does not mean anything, then

 

Ask an athlete, the importance of a career when he/she fails to achieve the fitness required for a “Make or Break” career tournament.

 

Or

 

Ask a decade old manager managing a club (for the past ten years), who has risked his health or well being and family to finish without a medal for the team, in his cabinet.

 

Or

 

Ask an Olympic hopeful, the importance of four years of hard work and dedication but failing to make a cut for the finals, because of an untimely injury.

 

Or

 

Ask a star club player, the importance of missing a season because he failed a simple drug test.

 

Or

 

Ask a tennis player, the importance of weeks of grueling preparations because they took their lesser known opponents lightly on that fateful day.

 

Or

 

Ask a debuting player, the importance of a day when he/she faces the real test and fails miserably to give his/her best on their day of days.

 

Or

 

Ask a football striker, the importance of a moment when he/she misses the most important scoring opportunity that might have won the match for his/her’s team.

 

Or

 

Ask a 100m Sprint World Record holder, the importance of a second because he/she wasn’t quick enough at the Olympics by a second.

 

Or

 

Ask a F1 driver, the importance of a thousandth of a second when he fails to take the pole position in a season defining race.

 

If we get answers to such questions, probably we will be happy with what we can get out from our lives and not wait for what it can give us.

 

This is life, the greatest gift of nature that we take for granted.

 

Article dedicated to my best buddies Ravi Jaiswal and Bhushan Raut, who left for the heavenly adobe, a cruel end to such promising lives.

 

To the Reader : Please donot award a POTD to this piece.

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