New York YankeesDownload App

Selena Roberts, Ann Coulter, and A-Rod

ST. PETERSBURG, FL - APRIL 14:  Alex Rodriguez of the New York Yankees watches batting practice before a game against the Tampa Bay Rays April 14, 2009 in St. Petersburg, Florida.  (Photo by Al Messerschmidt/Getty Images)
michael eisnerCorrespondent ISeptember 10, 2016

For those of you who have been living under a really big rock the past few months, Selena Roberts released her long-anticipated unauthorized biography of Alex Rodriguez this week.

Roberts is an accomplished reporter for Sports Illustrated, and has been for years.

But this exploit of Rodriguez has gone too far. She has delved into the depths of one man's personal life the way no person ever should.

Like some sort of creepy stalker.

She kind of reminds me of good old Ann Coulter. You know, the blond-ambition extreme right-wing republican who once referred to 9/11 widows as...well, let's just say that I can't print what she said.

Rodriguez is the biggest star in baseball. He's won three MVP awards and signed the largest contract in the history of baseball—twice. He also plays for the Yankees.

The only knock on Rodriguez was the fact that he disappeared in the clutch and never won the big one.

Kind of like Selena Roberts, only without the MVPs and the hundreds of millions of dollars in earned income.

Roberts felt compelled to write this book for reasons that are unknown. Secret agenda? Did Rodriguez shun her advances? What, then?

We found out a few months ago that Rodriguez used performance enhancing drugs. He admitted it. Many of us were not sure whether he was being completely candid. The luster wore off his shine.

After a few weeks, we got over it.

Until Roberts' book debuted, which ironically was, and still is, outsold by Joe Torre's book which painted a far more flattering picture of this beleaguered superstar.

This should die down, too.

Selena Roberts, like Ann Coulter, just doesn't get it.

Men don't enjoy gossip nearly as much as women do. And there's a lot of stuff in this book that can be chalked up to nothing more than gossip.

Like the accusation that Rodriguez was tipping pitches as some sort of "slump insurance."

Preposterous. But not to Roberts.

You see, baseball fans are always looking for someone or something to believe in. Like Roy Hobbs or the 2008 Tampa Bay Rays.

We forgive our heroes faster than we forgive our own family members, sometimes.

The fact is that when someone like Selena Roberts has it in for someone, like Rodriguez, she pulls no punches. And the sad part is that many people, if not most, who read these types of books perceive them to be the absolute truth.

Ann Coulter tried so hard to smear Barack Obama and other prominent Democrats to the point where she became an annoyance, even to those who shared the same beliefs as her.

I haven't seen or heard from Coulter in quite a while.

Selena Roberts deserves the same fate.

Where can I comment?

Stay on your game

Latest news, insights, and forecasts on your teams across leagues.

Choose Teams
Get it on the App StoreGet it on Google Play

Real-time news for your teams right on your mobile device.

Download
Copyright © 2017 Bleacher Report, Inc. Turner Broadcasting System, Inc. All Rights Reserved. BleacherReport.com is part of Bleacher Report – Turner Sports Network, part of the Turner Sports and Entertainment Network. Certain photos copyright © 2017 Getty Images. Any commercial use or distribution without the express written consent of Getty Images is strictly prohibited. AdChoices