Riots: Some Bad Things About The Game "Soccer"

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Riots: Some Bad Things About The Game

Soccer riots have always been something of a mystery.

The violence in hockey is at least compatible. Grown men in heavy costumes skating at high speed with blades on their feet to create enough tension and energy to start a fight in a hurry.

In baseball, a hard leather ball thrown 100 km/h and the head can make understandable that you want to charge the mound.

But football?

Even the game is going at a slow pace and hardly inspires more focused concentration on the field itself.

American commentators jokingly portray the reason for soccer riots as low score low key occasions. They often say, "after paying nearly $100 for seats and the fight against the crowds to see two teams play a match while an end in a tie 0-0, you can riot."

However, for the rest of the world, soccer riots are no laughing matter.



People are dying

Death from football riots occur worldwide. They were recorded in Germany, England, Greece, Spain, South Africa, Italy, and Latin America.

In 2001, a football riot in Ghana killed 138 people. While it is in our human nature to have a visceral response and succumb to the mob mentality that any fan would be killed simply by watching a football match is tragedy at its peak.

All sports have to have players and fans more noble and more a part of the tapestry of humanity. Loss of life to a soccer game really shows how we have reduced our ability to connect with another.



Politics enter

What distinguishes football from many other sports is its international reputation.

Soccer is not a property of any one country, people or race, but is an international phenomenon, which encompasses a variety of people, ideas and landscapes.

Given the great diversity of participants in the game, world politics often play an unfortunate part in soccer riots. When countries become enemies or evoke different political positions residents often leave the soccer team to play their frustration. This creates an energy in anger and the false good sport to violence in the stands.

A riot at a soccer game between Iran and Japan was said to be motivated by protesters fed up with Iran sex rights violence. The riots that broke out left three dead.

In 2004, a soccer riot in Rome was scheduled to protest against government spending on education and sport. When the tension in the world invades the field of sport, everybody loses.



Antisocial behavior

Unfortunately, football seems unable to get rid of its reputation as a riot adventure. It attracts enthusiasts who want to be part of the crowd mentality and creates an atmosphere of anti-social and anti-authority behavior.

The number one accident of any football riot is usually the police or the authorities who came to maintain order in and around the stadium. Gangs of youths who call themselves "football hooligans" have voluntarily begun to infiltrate the world of football to disseminate their own brand of anti-authoritarian violence.

The model Olympic sports competitions put forward only when individuals and teams to the best of their ability to society as a whole is a nourished and inspired by their progress.

Soccer riots has the opposite effect on the sport as a whole and disadvantages the common good.

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