NHL Trade Rumors: Latest Buzz Around Flyers, Senators and More

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NHL Trade Rumors: Latest Buzz Around Flyers, Senators and More
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The NHL season continues to roll on, and the trade rumors surrounding the league and some of the most storied franchises are starting to sky rocket.

Teams like the Philadelphia Flyers, Ottawa Senators and others are reportedly looking to make deals, and the rumors around which players could be involved has enveloped the hockey community.

 

Philadelphia Flyers

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The Philadelphia Flyers continue to struggle in every facet of the game, and with injuries continuing to mount the organization may be getting close to not only making a deal, but making that trade a blockbuster.

According to Bruce Garrioch of The Ottawa Sun, the Flyers “would like to make ‘a big move’ to shake up their struggling club. That has proved to be difficult in the current environment.”

Garrioch is right about the difficulty of getting a deal done for the Flyers; especially with the limited salary cap space the team has (h/t CapGeek.com).

One possible solution would be moving the high-priced contracts of injured players like Chris Pronger and Matt Walker to the long-term injured reserve. That would give them more wiggle room to make a possible deal.

There are plenty of big names on the market, and Philadelphia GM Paul Holmgren has made monster deals in the past; this is a story to keep an eye on.

 

Ottawa Senators

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The Ottawa Senators are heading toward another year of mediocrity, and it is only a matter of time before the organization has no choice but to trade some of their depth at goaltender to add a promising prospect or future picks to the struggling team.

While Eric Francis of The Calgary Sun is speculating on a deal involving the Flames, he is confirming reports that the Senators are looking to make a move:

Still, it's hard to believe the Flames have the appetite or depth to send a second-rounder to Ottawa, which is what the Sens are reportedly asking to replenish the pick they gave the St. Louis Blues to acquire [Ben] Bishop last year.

Many franchises across the league are struggling in net, and a talent as promising as a young prospect like Ben Bishop is extremely valuable.

Asking for a second-round pick may be too pricey, but if Ottawa is truly intending to move the goalie, a team will eventually bite on this deal; expect the Senators to be active as the season progresses.

 

Things Are About to Heat Up?

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There are always rumors surrounding the NHL, but there is a general feeling that as the season continues to progress and the contenders and pretenders designate whether they are buyers or sellers, the lockout-shortened season will be full of deals.

In a separate report from Bruce Garrioch of The Ottawa Sun, the talk around the league is that the trade talks will begin to heat up sooner rather than later:

League sources told the Sun Tuesday it's going to take at least another week before the market shakes loose and there's enough separation between the top and the bottom-feeders for teams to start having serious trade talks.

Will we see more trades in the lockout-shortened season?

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The rumor mill for the NHL is already red-hot, so if there is expected to be more trade talk, hockey fans are in for a wild lockout-shortened season.

The new collective bargaining agreement will mean teams are able to get out of two bad contracts before next year, and the unrestricted free agents that won’t be re-signed should expected to be moved as more teams feel they're on the cusp of contending and see a chance to make a run at the Stanley Cup.

It’s going to get wild over the next two months, and hockey fans should expect a much higher number of trades during this unpredictable season.

 

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