R.A. Dickey Trade Was Costly for Toronto Blue Jays, but Worth It

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R.A. Dickey Trade Was Costly for Toronto Blue Jays, but Worth It
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As of about noon ET on Monday, December 17, 2012, the pending agreement between the Toronto Blue Jays and New York Mets that would send Cy Young Award winner R.A. Dickey to Toronto in return for a few stud prospects has been finalized.

Physicals still need to be passed, but the main domino holding up the deal—Dickey agreeing to an extension with the Jays—has fallen.

According to Ken Rosenthal of Fox Sports, Dickey has agree to a two-year extension with Toronto, valued at about $25 million:

 

 

 

 

The trade will see super-prospect Travis D'Arnaud, top-tier pitching prospect Noah Syndergaard, veteran backstop John Buck and another unnamed prospect shipped off to New York City.

Nick Laham/Getty Images

Some fans have taken to Twitter, complaining about the price tag that comes with acquiring Dickey. And, to be fair, they have a point. Giving up your organization's top prospect and No. 3 prospect is a steep price to pay, even for a Cy Young Award winner.

The price tag, however, is worth it.

First, let's analyze the Jays and their farm system after this deal.

Some are complaining that GM Alex Anthopoulos has dealt too much young talent this offseason. Thing is, he's done it from an area of depth in the organization.

Dealing Syndergaard isn't ideal, but the Jays still have plenty of talented arms among their top 10 prospects. Aaron Sanchez, Daniel Norris, Roberto Osuna and Matt Smoral are all among the Jays' top 10 prospects (even before Syndergaard was dealt), as is Marcus Stroman, and Adonys Cardona sits at No.11 (via MLB.com).

Sure, none of these guys have proven much of anything. Then again, neither has Syndergaard, who's never pitched above Low-A ball.

Losing D'Arnaud will upset a lot of Jays fans, but the Jays aren't exactly doomed behind the plate, with youngster J.P. Arencibia doing a fine job since he was called up. And hey, you have to give up talent to get talent.

Do you still believe the Jays gave up too much for Dickey?

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So, you see, while the price was steep, it's not like the Jays mortgaged the future as some fans may believe. In fact, one just has to look at how the pitching market has been this offseason to see why paying such a steep price for Dickey was necessary.

James Shields netted multiple top-100 prospects, including super-prospect Wil Myers (who would be the equivalent to Travis D'Arnaud in that deal) and Jake Odorizzi, who isn't just a top-100 prospect, but actually has impressive numbers at a level as high as Triple-A.

Heck, Anibal Sanchez, who boasts a career ERA of 3.75, was just signed to a five-year, $80 million deal.

Pitching isn't cheap, folks.

Not to mention, there is still plenty of young talent left in the farm system, and guys like Drew Hutchison and Kyle Drabek are still under team control should someone decide to test the free-agent waters (see: Josh Johnson) after the 2013 season.

The Jays now have a legitimate shot at winning a World Series for the first time in 20 years. And the current window to win will be open through the 2015 season.

So cheer up, Jays fans, the team is built to win now and is still built to win in the long run.

I may not have been a fan of acquiring Dickey early on, but considering what the Jays gave up to get him and the fact that he signed an extension (for a fairly reasonable rate, I might add), it has brought me around.

There just aren't many reasons to be opposed to this trade and extension.

 

Still think that the Blue Jays gave up too much? Sound off in the comments section below.

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