Why the Tampa Bay Buccaneers Are the NFL's Most Exciting Team to Follow

Use your ← → (arrow) keys to browse more stories
Why the Tampa Bay Buccaneers Are the NFL's Most Exciting Team to Follow
J. Meric/Getty Images

It's Sunday.

You are sitting on your couch, settled into the same cushion you always sit in—you know, the one with a perfect imprint of your backside.

The TV is on.

You are watching your team, your team, duke it out in a virtual dogfight over 100 yards of turf and two golden goal posts.

The score is 21-13, and there are exactly 62 seconds left on the game clock.

It is your team who is behind, but you have the ball at your own 20-yard line.

You're going to need a long touchdown drive and a two-point conversion to tie it up.

Your center snaps the football. Your quarterback passes to your top wide receiver, one of the best in the league, but not even he can keep that throw from hitting the dirt.

You clench your teeth tighter.

Again your QB takes the snap. He's looking shaky in the pocket but still manages to get the ball off to his No.3 receiver, a skinny dude with some crazy tall hair. He makes the catch, runs with it and gets wrecked.

The yellow flags fly, and the other team is dealt a 15-yard penalty for unnecessary roughness.

This moves you past midfield.

Another snap and a quick pass to your rookie running back. He gets out of bounds put does not get the first down.

Next play is a short pass toward the middle of the field. You are actually thankful that it wasn't completed, as your guys might have run out of time if it had been.

Third down and a 17-yarder to your top receiver. This brings you to the opposition's 24-yard line.

You spike the ball—rather your team spikes the ball.

Remember: You are just a spectator.

That doesn't stop the hyperventilating, though.

Less than 20 seconds left on the clock.

Two, maybe three plays left, if you're lucky.

And you are, luckily.

Your team needs only one to get into the holy land because your quarterback drives a laser into the back of the end zone, and your No.1 receiver snags it through tight coverage.

You still need to nail the two-point conversion for the tie, though.

Which you do. A fake to the running back, a bullet pass and the game's tied with 12 seconds left in regulation.

And when you win the coin toss, you know there's no way that you aren't getting that touchdown to end it all.

Of course, you're right.

Your team executes a coup de grace with ease, and you get a nice "W."

Now imagine this happening every single week for four months.

The Tampa Bay Buccaneers score quickly and often. The team is fourth in the NFL in points per game, averaging 28.2 PPG. 

While everyone loves when their team puts up a ton of points, the games are even more enjoyable when they are tightly contested till the clock hits zero. Pretty much every time the Bucs set foot on the field, you know the game's going to be close, as only three times this year has Tampa won/lost by more than a touchdown. 

Whether you like an all-out aerial assault or a ground-and-pound offense, the Bucs O will give you a show. Josh Freeman seemingly throws the ball deep every other passing down, which grants him an average 7.91 yards per attempt, the league's sixth-best value. His favorite target, Vincent Jackson, is the NFL's premier deep threat.

Doug Martin leads the rushing attack. So far, he has 1,050 yards on the ground, behind only Adrian Peterson, Arian Foster and Marshawn Lynch, the last of whom Martin is only one yard behind. The Muscle Hamster runs with endless enthusiasm and is an absolute pleasure to watch.

Even if none of this appeals to you, the Bucs have Gerald McCoy at defensive tackle, a wrecking ball among the top five D-linemen in the league.

To sum it all up, if there's anything you like about football, Tampa Bay has it (unless you're into a lockdown defensive secondary—the Bucs don't have one of those).

That is why the Tampa Bay Buccaneers are the most exciting team to follow.

Load More Stories
Tampa Bay Buccaneers

Subscribe Now

We will never share your email address

Thanks for signing up.