Philadelphia Flyers: Franchise's 5 Worst Offseason Moves Ever

Joe Fitzhenry@@joefitz1014Correspondent IIAugust 6, 2012

Philadelphia Flyers: Franchise's 5 Worst Offseason Moves Ever

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    Every sports franchise in history has more than their fair share of good and bad moves. Whether it comes through a trade, free-agent signing or the draft, each team has players that haven't exactly panned out. 

    Sure, some of these moves are more numerous with certain organizations, but nobody can fully avoid a move gone sour here and there. 

    With that being said, it's time to take a look at the five worst moves in the history of the Philadelphia Flyers

5. Justin Williams for Danny Markov (2004)

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    This was a terrible trade for the Flyers all around. Not only was the player they picked up a huge bust, Williams has since turned into a very dependable player. 

    He has won a pair of Stanley Cups with the Hurricanes and Kings, along with turning into a consistent 20-goal scorer up front. 

    Meanwhile, Danny Markov played less than one full season in Philly and was traded to Nashville before he decided to take his talents to Russia.

    Not exactly the way the Flyers envisioned it happening...

4. Drafting Maxime Ouellet (1999)

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    This one wasn't exactly the best draft pick that the Flyers have made over the past decade. 

    As the 22nd overall pick in the 1999 NHL draft, Ouellet was destined to become the goalie of the future for Philly. 

    Instead, he played a grand total of two games with the team before being shipped to Washington as part of the Adam Oates deal in 2002. 

    He would later bounce around between the AHL and Europe before retiring for good from the sport in 2009. 

3. Drafting Ryan Sittler (1992)

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    Drafting the relative of a hockey great should normally be a good thing, right? After all, it has to run in the family, right? 

    Wrong. 

    By that logic, Hall of Famer Darryl Sittler's son, Ryan, should have become the next big thing in the City of Brotherly Love. 

    The Flyers patiently waited while Ryan played two seasons for the University of Michigan before grooming him as a top prospect.

    Things never quite went as planned; the younger Sittler never played a game for the Orange and Black and was out of hockey by age 25.

    Add that to the list of things you don't want to see from the No. 7 overall pick in the 1992 NHL draft.  

2. Peter Forsberg (2005)

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    One of the most hyped free-agent signings in not only the history of the Flyers, but in the history of Philadelphia sports as a whole. 

    Forsberg was supposed to be the savior, the one that led this team to the promised land and brought home a Stanley Cup. 

    In his first season, the Swede posted 75 points in just 60 games and things were all well and good on Broad St. 

    However, the relationship between player and management turned sour when the former Hart Trophy winner insisted on playing injured for his home country in the 2006 Winter Olympics. 

    As one would expect, this didn't exactly please the Flyers, and matters were made worse when Forsberg chose not to have reconstructive surgery on his right ankle in the winter of 2007. 

    It became painfully clear that things weren't working out, and Philly dealt their once-prized possession to the Predators in exchange for Ryan Parent and Scottie Upshall. 

    To add the cherry on top, the team finished with the league's worst record that season yet still lost the coin flip for the No. 1 pick in the draft. 

    That pick would go to the Chicago Blackhawks, who chose a fellow by the name of Patrick Kane. 

1. Trading for Eric Lindros (1993)

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    In 1993, the Philadelphia Flyers traded Ron Hextall, Peter Forsberg, Mike Ricci, Kerry Huffman, Steve Duchesne, Chris Simon, the team's first-round picks in 1993 and 1994 along with $15 million to the Quebec Nordiques all in exchange for one player, Eric Lindros. 

    Prior to a series of concussion issues, Lindros had a productive career in Philly but never quite led the team to Cup glory.

    Looking back, the Flyers gave up two Hall of Famers (Hextall and Forsberg), five fairly decent players (Ricci, Huffman, Duchesne, Jocelyn Thibault and Nolan Baumgartner) and one head case (Simon) in exchange for a player who battled numerous injuries for the better part of his career. 

    That all goes without mentioning the $15 million that was sent along as well, which isn't exactly chump change. 

    Simply put, this is the worst trade in NHL history.