Manny Pacquiao vs. Floyd Mayweather Jr. Fans: Where's the Balance? Part II

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Manny Pacquiao vs. Floyd Mayweather Jr. Fans: Where's the Balance? Part II
Ethan Miller/Getty Images

In April of 2011, I wrote an article titled: Manny Pacquiao vs. Floyd Mayweather Jr. Fans: Where's the Balance? An interesting fan discussion followed. At the time, the Pacquiao vs. Mayweather Jr. controversy was already in full force, and one of the major topics on boxing websites and forums was the direction of blame. Who was to blame for their fight now getting postponed?

The performance enhancing drugs were one of the hot topics. Of course the question of whether Pacquiao was avoiding testing with various excuses, or was simply trying to stand his ground, was another subject matter.

The main purpose of my previous piece, as well as this one, is to look at and demonstrate the tremendous gap between fans’ opinion of who to blame. In my previous piece, I looked at a poll by L.A. Times, which was conducted in early 2010. The poll showed a clear-cut opinion of what the fans thought.

A staggering 78.3 percent of the votes held Mayweather Jr. responsible, while only 7.3 percent thought that Manny was the one holding the fight hostage. What was interesting is that only 1.5 percent thought that Arum was to blame, while almost 12.96 percent pointed their fingers at Floyd’s promoters and his promotional company.

What is interesting, yet impossible to determine, is who those voters are in terms of their boxing involvement. I would assume, safely, that the majority are Pacquiao fanatics rather than unbiased boxing fans.

It has now been two years since that poll was taken, and since then there is a very interesting shift in public opinion. There is now a brand new poll on ESPN.com painting a completely different picture.

Do you think that there is a shift in public opinion regarding the blame game?

Submit Vote vote to see results

While there are fewer votes since it is a brand new poll, the change is still apparent. While most people still blame Mayweather Jr. for the fight still being kept from the public, 54 percent blame Floyd vs. 15 percent blaming Pacquiao. 31 percent think that they are both to blame.

While half the people put the blame on Floyd, it looks like the blame is no longer so one-sided. People are suddenly not so sure that Mayweather Jr. is the only one making it difficult for the fight to happen, and that maybe Pacquiao's team is not playing ball as well.

In the recent past, there have been numerous statements made by the members of Pacquiao's team, which injected doubt into many boxing fans’ minds.

From Alex Ariza confirming that it is Arum’s fault, to Arum saying that he had no involvement when Pacquiao and Mayweather Jr. communicated in person, it seems like their statements and explanations are becoming more and more convoluted.

At this point in time, it seems as though Mayweather Jr. is going the extra distance to do what he and many other people think is beyond reasonable to make the fight happen. We hear from Floyd everywhere: Twitter, radio, video interviews and online articles. All he is trying to voice is his drive to make the mega-fight happen.

Of course Mayweather Jr. has also been known to retract or deny statements that he clearly made, and that have been caught on video. He has been rude and ignorant towards Pacquiao, making racist remarks and calling him names.

Having said all this, many fans are still what they used to be: blind fanatics of a persona, rather than the sport itself. Like zombies, they listen to anything their champion says, and it goes straight to the brain, bypassing any common sense.

To be honest, I am at fault for this happening as well, but I am trying to learn to fight it. What do you think? Out of the posts being made on the topic of Mayweather Jr. vs. Pacquiao, what percentage of the people are strictly fanatics and what percentage are knowledgeable boxing fans?

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