Tiger Woods Players Championship: Highlighting What Went Wrong at TPC Sawgrass

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Tiger Woods Players Championship: Highlighting What Went Wrong at TPC Sawgrass
Sam Greenwood/Getty Images

Tiger Woods sputtered to another disappointing finish at The Players Championship, shooting a one-over 73 in the final round.

He finished the tournament at one-under, posting scores of 74, 68 and 72 before Sunday. He finished tied for 39th overall, his second-worst finish at TPC Sawgrass.

It was his third straight poor performance, coming on the heels of the Masters, where he finished tied for 40th, and last week at Quail Hollow, where he missed the cut.

But despite the criticism Woods will likely receive in the coming days, his play wasn't as bad as the final scorecard would indicate.

So what went wrong? Just scroll down to find out.

 

The Front Nine

Andy Lyons/Getty Images

Woods had an absolute nightmare on the front nine, hitting three bogeys, one double-bogey and just one birdie.

The fourth hole in particular gave him trouble. Although he splashed his approach shot into the lake, Tiger insisted that he didn't make a mistake, saying that the wind caught it instead.

Whatever happened, it was a disastrous development for Woods, who crippled himself by double-bogeying the par-4 hole. If he had just played it safe and saved par on No. 4, he would have risen into a tie for 25th with Phil Mickelson, Jim Furyk and others.

 

Greens in Regulation

Woods hit just 65.3 percent of his greens in regulation, which was worse than his season average of 68.7 percent.

At any course, a low GIR percentage is troubling. But at TPC Sawgrass, where four of the last eight winners have led the field in GIR, it was particularly damning.

Without capitalizing on his approach opportunities, Tiger routinely dug himself a hole that he couldn't climb out of. 

 

Tiger's History at TPC

Simply put, TPC Sawgrass just isn't Tiger's course.

Although he's won here once before, he's only finished in the top 10 once since 2002. In that same time frame, he's also shot just seven sub-70 rounds in 35 tries and withdrawn from the event twice. 

He struggled again this weekend, but given his history here, nobody should be surprised.

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