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B/R NBA 200: Ranking NBA's Best Players of 2013-14 Season

Adam FromalNational NBA Featured ColumnistMay 19, 2014

B/R NBA 200: Ranking NBA's Best Players of 2013-14 Season

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    Who ruled the NBA during the 2013-14 season? 

    As we've moved through each of the nine positions, both the five traditional spots and the four non-traditional ones, that's the question that's been tossing and turning in the back of our minds. If you missed any of the individual positional rankings, you can find all of them here

    But now it's time for the final order. 

    No longer are we comparing Chris Paul to Stephen Curry, James Harden to Dwyane Wade, Kevin Love to LaMarcus Aldridge and Damian Lillard to Goran Dragic. Everyone is being thrown into the same pot now, whether his name is LeBron James, Kevin Durant, Carmelo Anthony, Blake Griffin, Anthony Davis or something else entirely. 

    It's also worth noting that the playoffs do not factor into these rankings, as the scores were compiled during the regular season. 

    The NBA 200 metric identifies the players who performed best during the 2013-14 season. Potential doesn't matter, and neither does reputation. It's all about what happened this season, and this season only. All positions are graded using the same criteria (though rim protection was added into the equation for bigger positions), but the categories are weighted differently to reflect changing roles: 

    • Scoring 
    • Non-Scoring Offense: Facilitating and Off-Ball Offense 
    • Defense: On-Ball, Off-Ball and Rim Protection
    • Rebounding
    • Intangibles: Conduct and Durability

    For a full explanation of how these scores were determined, go here. And do note these aren't your father's classification schemes for each position. Players' spots were determined not by playing style, but by how much time they spent at each position throughout the season, largely based on data from 82games.com, and we're expanding the traditional five to include four combo positions.

    In the case of ties, the order is determined in subjective fashion by ranking the more coveted player in the higher spot. That was done by a voting committee comprised of myself, Associate NBA Editor Joel Cordes, NBA Lead Writer D.J. Foster, National NBA Featured Columnist Grant Hughes, NBA Lead Writer Josh Martin and Associate NBA Editor Ethan Norof

     

    Note: All statistics come from Basketball-Reference.comNBA.com's SportVU Databases and Synergy Sports (subscription required). They're current as of March 28. 

Notable Injured Players

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    In order to qualify for the rankings, players must have suited up at least 20 times and spent 400 or more minutes on the court. 

    That means that a few superstars were left out of the rankings, as well as a handful more notable players. Pinpointing where they would've ranked had they remained healthy is a futile task, but they deserve mention nonetheless. 

    With the qualifications out of the way, the following players would've had a solid chance of making the NBA 200, though nothing is actually guaranteed: 

    • Kobe Bryant, Los Angeles Lakers
    • Danilo Gallinari, Denver Nuggets
    • Carl Landry, Sacramento Kings
    • Brook Lopez, Brooklyn Nets
    • JaVale McGee, Denver Nuggets
    • Steve Nash, Los Angeles Lakers
    • Nerlens Noel, Philadelphia 76ers
    • Emeka Okafor, Phoenix Suns
    • Quincy Pondexter, Memphis Grizzlies
    • Jason Richardson, Philadelphia 76ers
    • Derrick Rose, Chicago Bulls
    • Greg Smith, Chicago Bulls

200-196: Smith, Roberts, Felton, Fournier, Miller

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    200. Ish Smith, Phoenix Suns

    64/100

    Continuity does wonderful things. Smith played for the Houston Rockets and Memphis Grizzlies in 2010-11, the Golden State Warriors and Orlando Magic in 2011-12, the Magic and Milwaukee Bucks in 2012-13 and now the Phoenix Suns in 2013-14. He received the most playing time of his career, and he became one of the better bench bargains in the league. 

    199. Brian Roberts, New Orleans Pelicans

    64/100

    Roberts has to be pleased with the niche he's carved out for himself. He'll thrive as a backup point guard, whether he remains by the bayou or signs on with a new team once he hits the open market. But still, that's a great role for a guy who went undrafted out of Dayton in 2008 and played in both Israel and Germany before joining forces with NOLA.  

    198. Raymond Felton, New York Knicks

    64/100

    The decline has been fast and furious for Felton, who became a punchline during the 2013-14 season. Had he stayed distraction-free and completely healthy, thereby earning a "10" in the intangibles section, he'd still barely have been a top-30 floor general. 

    197. Evan Fournier, Denver Nuggets

    64/100

    The Nuggets have to be pleased with Fournier's development, as he became a significantly more well-rounded player during his second go-round in the Association. It's easy to forget since he already has two seasons under his belt and played professionally before he was drafted, but the swingman won't turn 22 until the 2014-15 season is about to begin. 

    196. Andre Miller, Washington Wizards

    64/100

    The 2013-14 campaign was a disaster for Miller. He had trouble getting along with a first-year head coach who was only a decade older than him, his playing time suffered, and his performance followed suit before he joined the Wizards. 

195-191: Antetokounmpo, Blatche, Sefolosha, Patterson, Anderson

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    195. Giannis Antetokoumpo, Milwaukee Bucks

    64/100

    Antetokounmpo may not be dominating the league right now, but it's easy to see him doing so down the line. His first season with the Bucks proved that he was significantly further along his developmental curve than many expected, a statement that applies to both sides of the ball. 

    194. Andray Blatche, Brooklyn Nets

    64/100

    If Blatche's career is a roller coaster, it most certainly didn't peak during the 2013-14 season. Those high points came in 2010-11and at times during last seasonbut the positive, feel-good story didn't resurface all that often during the most recent go-round. He remains an offensive stud, but he's too much of a liability in other areas to gain all that much playing time on a competitive team. 

    193. Thabo Sefolosha, Oklahoma City Thunder

    64/100

    As the young players in OKC continue to develop, Sefolosha is starting to be phased out of the lineup. He's still a valuable defensive contributor with a penchant for the athletic play, but it won't be long before his stranglehold on the starting 2-guard spot is loosened rather significantly. 

    192. Patrick Patterson, Toronto Raptors

    64/100

    Patterson is by no means a glamorous player, but he's a workhorse who plays within his own limitations. The development of a more potent three-point stroke in Toronto helped turn his 2013-14 campaign around, and defenses have to pay attention to him when his jumper is starting to heat up. 

    191. James Anderson, Philadelphia 76ers

    65/100

    Anderson was a decent enough stopgap option for the Sixers during a year filled with tanking. But he didn't distinguish himself in any notable way, which is going to make it awfully difficult for him to have a repeat season going forward. Hopefully he enjoyed this one. 

190-186: Mayo, Henry, Wroten, Sims, Miles

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    190. O.J. Mayo, Milwaukee Bucks

    65/100

    Mayo didn't decline in 2013-14. He plummeted. Once a promising offensive spark plug, he was more of a liability than anything else during his first season with Milwaukee, which helps explain why he lost his starting gig about a third of the way through the year. 

    189. Xavier Henry, Los Angeles Lakers

    65/100

    After bouncing around with the New Orleans Hornets and Memphis Grizzlies, Henry finally found an excellent opportunity in purple and gold this year. He thrived early in the season, but injuries and a failure to attack later in the campaign prevented him from looking like a long-term keeper. 

    188. Tony Wroten, Philadelphia 76ers

    65/100

    Wroten received far more opportunities to put up numbers during his sophomore season in the City of Brotherly Love than he did during his rookie go-round with the Memphis Grizzlies, and he looked like a promising player at times. Though he wasn't able to maintain his success for long stretches of the season, there were more than a few games in which he absolutely exploded and put all his potential on display. 

    187. Henry Sims, Philadelphia 76ers

    65/100

    It's hard to tell what Sims' future looks like, even if he's enjoyed a decent present. While his numbers look good and he grades well in the scouting criteria, he's also the product of opportunity, as no other team in the NBA would have realistically given him this many minutes during his second season. And with Nerlens Noel set to return next season, everything is up in the air. 

    186. C.J. Miles, Cleveland Cavaliers

    65/100

    Miles is by no means a star player, nor is he going to earn that designation at any point in the future. He's more of a journeyman who is still in the midst of figuring out which system is the best at maximizing his talents. Cleveland has come close to doing so, but it can get better. 

185-181: Davis, Nicholson, Dalembert, Mozgov, Ross

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    185. Glen Davis, Los Angeles Clippers

    65/100

    Davis is a talented offensive big man with a hulking body that he can use to play adequate defense and make some sort of contribution on the glass. When playing for a struggling team like the Magic, that's enough to earn quite a few minutes; when playing for a contender like the Clippers, it's enough to be a reserve. 

    184. Andrew Nicholson, Orlando Magic

    65/100

    Even though he received slightly less playing time as a sophomore than he did during his rookie season, Nicholson seems to be thought of highly within the Magic offices. And for good reason, because he's shown off a well-rounded game that seems primed for a breakout if he's ever made into more of a featured player. 

    183. Samuel Dalembert, Dallas Mavericks

    65/100

    Dalembert wasn't a glamorous addition for the Mavericks during the 2013 offseason, but he definitely proved to be a worthwhile signing. The center is by no means a star, but his consistent contributions on both ends of the court, both before and after a shot went up, paid dividends. 

    182. Timofey Mozgov, Denver Nuggets

    65/100

    "Mozgoving" used to mean being dunked on with ridiculous force from so far away from the basket that hand-to-rim contact wasn't quite possible. It still does, but perhaps we should expand the definition to include quality play on both ends of the court. Mozgov is still only 27 years old and has started to showcase far better offensive skills while remaining a big presence on the boards and at the rim. 

    181. Terrence Ross, Toronto Raptors

    65/100

    Toronto fans have to be thrilled about what Ross has shown during the 2013-14 season. His 51-point effort notwithstanding, the swingman still displayed well-rounded talent, and it appears highly likely that he could develop into a scoring stud down the road. 

180-176: O'Quinn, Aminu, Calathes, Williams, Williams

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    180. Kyle O'Quinn, Orlando Magic

    66/100

    O'Quinna physical big man who has become somewhat of a rebounding, rim-protecting and intimidation specialistshouldn't be here. He started playing basketball in 10th grade, went to Norfolk State and arrived in the NBA as a relatively unknown second-round pick. But here he is. 

    179. Al-Farouq Aminu, New Orleans Pelicans

    66/100

    Aminu isn't the most glamorous player out there, and he was often substituted out for a bigger offensive threat within the NOLA organization. However, the 23-year-old still has time to grow into his 6'9", 215-pound frame, becoming more than an off-ball defender and noteworthy rebounder. His game might not be pretty, but it was moderately effective in 2013-14 with the potential to lose the adverb going forward. 

    178. Nick Calathes, Memphis Grizzlies

    66/100

    Perhaps the most surprising featured player in the rankings of any position, Calathes was a second-round draft pick for the Minnesota Timberwolves back in 2009 and bounced around in Greece and Russia before coming to the Association. He may not be a highly coveted player and doesn't get much attention from the national media, but his first year was filled with a surprising amount of success. 

    177. Lou Williams, Atlanta Hawks

    66/100

    The 2013-14 season has been a rough one for Williams, who suffered through injury recoveries, bouts of ineffectiveness and subsequent benchings before regaining his form. But the future is brighter for the 27-year-old combo guard, as he's continued to display the same skills that made him a special offensive player, just not quite as often as usual. 

    176. Mo Williams, Portland Trail Blazers

    66/100

    Arguably the league's best passer off the bench, Williams has struggled to adapt to the inefficient shots that the Blazers often grant him. His scoring just isn't particularly valuable at this stage of his career, which forces his overall value to decline as well. 

175-171: Thompson, Humphries, Harris, Bass, Smith

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    175. Jason Thompson, Sacramento Kings

    66/100

    Thompson continued to bounce in and out of the Sacramento Kings starting lineup throughout the 2013-14 campaign, but he put up steady numbers all the while. There isn't much upside left in the 27-year-old combo big man, although being a known commodity isn't a bad thing when it involves posting decent scoring (7.1) and rebounding (6.4) averages night in and night out. 

    174. Kris Humphries, Boston Celtics

    66/100

    Humphries' first season in Beantown has to be considered a marginal success. He established himself as a rebounding threat who could make limited contributions in specialized areas on both ends on the court, and he continued playing tough, physical, tone-setting basketball whenever Brad Stevens gave him any sort of run. 

    173. Devin Harris, Dallas Mavericks

    66/100

    Had Harris been healthier, he likely would have been more effective during his return to the Mavs, the team with which he began his career back in the mid-2000s. Fortunately for Dallas, he's still more than capable of breaking down lesser defenders off the dribble and is willing to exert plenty of energy on both ends of the court. 

    172. Brandon Bass, Boston Celtics

    66/100

    Bass essentially revealed his ceiling during the 2013-14 season. Even with Kevin Garnett and Paul Pierce on the Brooklyn Nets, even with Rajon Rondo missing much of the year, he wasn't able to step up and become a key offensive contributor, instead filling the exact same role he'd taken in the past. 

    171. J.R. Smith, New York Knicks

    66/100

    Smith was more of a distraction than an asset for the 2013-14 Knicks. Though he's still a great basketball talent and had a solid offensive season, he experienced a precipitous fall from winning a major award last year to barely making the cut in the NBA 200 this season.

170-166: Shumpert, Andersen, Allen, Collison, Wolters

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    170. Iman Shumpert, New York Knicks

    66/100

    Is it time to start reevaluating Shumpert's potential? He's always been viewed as a high-ceiling player, but three seasons in, we're still a few stories shy of that ceiling. A regression on both ends of the court didn't allow him to change that. 

    169. Chris Andersen, Miami Heat

    66/100

    The midseason signing from 2012-13 is still paying off for the Heat. Andersen knows his role, and he thrives in it, wreaking havoc on defense and making the occasional offensive contribution without ever overstepping his bounds. He may be a role player, but he's a valuable one. 

    168. Tony Allen, Memphis Grizzlies

    66/100

    A defensive ace with a self-aware offensive game, Allen remains a valuable piece of the Memphis puzzle. Without him in the lineup, the "grit and grind" mentality wouldn't be as applicable, and he remains one of the true mental leaders within the organization. 

    167. Nick Collison, Oklahoma City Thunder

    66/100

    Collison continued to pour his heart and soul into the OKC franchise, just as he has since he was drafted by the Seattle SuperSonics with the No. 12 pick of the 2003 NBA draft. He remains a model glue guy for any frontcourt player, and struggling big men trying to figure out how to maximize their effectiveness in a non-featured role should watch tape of him whenever possible.

    166. Nate Wolters, Milwaukee Bucks

    67/100

    An unheralded second-round draft pick, Wolters got an early opportunity when it seemed like everyone in Milwaukee was injured, and he capitalized on it. There weren't many flashes of future stardom, but he was a steady, intelligent and athletic presence in the backcourt who should have a lengthy career as an upper-tier role player or low-level starter. 

165-161: Watson, Crowder, Thompson, Kanter, McRoberts

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    165. C.J. Watson, Indiana Pacers

    67/100

    Watson is a strong ball-handler and consistent player who fits in nicely with the Pacers' defensive schemes. While he won't win games for them, he also won't lose them, as he ensures the bench unit isn't quite as detrimental as it's been in years past. 

    164. Jae Crowder, Dallas Mavericks

    67/100

    Crowder already looks like a second-round steal for the Mavericks, solely because of his defensive abilities. And chances are, his all-around game would fare even better if that's the type of style he was asked to play. He may be a role player, but he's a valuable one who might not always be locked into that limited spot. 

    163. Tristan Thompson, Cleveland Cavaliers

    67/100

    Based on his work ethic and the improvements he'd already shown during his first few seasons in the NBA, Thompson should've been right up there in the hunt for Most Improved Player. Instead, he regressed, failing to show any defensive development and doing nothing to prevent the screeching halt of his offensive improvement. 

    162. Enes Kanter, Utah Jazz

    67/100

    Kanter's first foray into a bigger role for the Utah Jazz was an adventure. He didn't stick in the starting five, as it was quite clear he had some significant developing to do on both ends of the court, particularly when he was playing defense. Fortunately, though, the potential is still there in spades. 

    161. Josh McRoberts, Charlotte Bobcats

    67/100

    A veteran who knows his role, McRoberts has just about maximized his talent. He knows his game and he sticks to it, thriving when he's shooting from the outside and involving his more athletically inclined teammates on a regular basis. 

160-156: Kidd-Gilchrist, Plumlee, Brewer, Chandler, Chandler

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    160. Michael Kidd-Gilchrist, Charlotte Bobcats

    67/100

    While his offensive development has been rather disappointing for a No. 2 pick, MKG has been a key part of the Charlotte Bobcats' turnaround. His scoring makes him a bit of a liability on one end, but his defense and rebounding fit right in with the team's grind-it-out mentality. 

    159. Miles Plumlee, Phoenix Suns

    67/100

    Plumlee could probably look even better in a role that features him more on the offensive end, but he was perfectly content to go from an afterthought with the Indiana Pacers to playing valuable basketball with the Suns. Without his consistent presence at the 5, the frontcourt would've been far weaker in the desert. 

    158. Corey Brewer, Minnesota Timberwolves

    67/100

    Another niche player, Brewer found himself in a perfect situation with the 'Wolves. Though his individual numbers—at least the box-score ones—declined, he was valuable because of his defense and ability to stretch out the other team with his transition offense. 

    157. Wilson Chandler, Denver Nuggets

    67/100

    There were flashes of the well-rounded brilliance that once made the 27-year-old small forward such a promising player, but Chandler never put all the pieces together. A lack of aggressiveness and injury woes prevented him from becoming quite as valuable as expected. 

    156. Tyson Chandler, New York Knicks

    67/100

    Chandler regressed rather significantly during his latest season, which can be blamed on age, health and the overall futility of the pieces supporting him. Though he remained a viable starting center, he slipped into the lower end of those players, and it's hard to see a big turnaround coming in the near future. It'll be rather difficult for him to live up to his $14.6 million salary in 2014-15.  

155-151: Stuckey, Robinson, Lamb, Hickson, Johnson

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    155. Rodney Stuckey, Detroit Pistons

    68/100

    Stuckey wasn't able to live up to the excitement he produced at the beginning of the season, but he was still a valuable offensive contributor for the Pistons. His driving ability suits him well, even if he'd become all the more dangerous with the development of an outside shot. 

    154. Nate Robinson, Denver Nuggets

    68/100

    Robinson, still only 29 years old, should bounce back when he's fully recovered from the ACL tear, but it's not like he was playing at a particularly high level. Even if he'd stayed fully healthy and maintained his numbers and style of play for the entire 2013-14 campaign, he'd trail 10 combo guards in these rankings. 

    153. Jeremy Lamb, Oklahoma City Thunder

    68/100

    The former Husky made terrific strides during his second season in the NBA, developing as a facilitator and figuring out how to play more effective defense on a consistent basis. He may never be a superstar, but that's not exactly what OKC needs, seeing as how Kevin Durant, Russell Westbrook and Serge Ibaka are already on the roster. His development at least helped validate the decision to let Kevin Martin go.

    152. J.J. Hickson, Denver Nuggets

    68/100

    Before the unfortunate end to his season, Hickson was in the process of establishing himself as a nice bargain in the Mile High City. Though defense wasn't exactly his forte, the big man was a nice asset on the boards and a quality contributor offensively, one who created quite a few highlight plays with his athletic and brutal dunks. 

    151. James Johnson, Memphis Grizzlies

    68/100

    It's hard to believe the arc that Johnson endured during just the 2013-14 season. He was waived by the Atlanta Hawks right before the start of the season, ended up playing for the Rio Grande Valley Vipers in the D-League through the middle of December, then was picked up by the Grizzlies and excelled. Talk about perseverance. 

150-146: Farmar, Blake, Frye, Anderson, Speights

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    150. Jordan Farmar, Los Angeles Lakers

    68/100

    When healthy, Farmar was a nice piece for the Lake Show. However, that didn't happen very often during an injury-plagued return from playing for Anadolu Efes, the Turkish squad for which he suited up throughout the 2012-13 campaign. 

    149. Steve Blake, Golden State Warriors

    68/100

    Blake struggled after leaving his comfortable purple-and-gold threads behind, but he's still a valuable veteran presence who can create offense for others and keep a defense honest with his three-point shooting. While he lacks upside, the floor is pretty high for a backup point guard. 

    148. Channing Frye, Phoenix Suns

    68/100

    From a statistical standpoint, Frye's season was largely similar to the one he posted in 2011-12, which is impressive enough after sitting out an entire season with an enlarged heart. But he got better as a three-point shooter this year, and he did so for a team with a lot more offensive talent. Just maintaining his production was highly beneficial for the desert-based franchise. 

    147. Ryan Anderson, New Orleans Pelicans

    68/100

    Had Anderson remained healthy throughout the season instead of suffering fluke injuries, he likely would've found himself ranked significantly higher. The scoring might have regressed slightly, but he'd be more effective on the boards and defensively. My best guess is that a 5-of-5 in durability—as opposed to the 1-of-5 he received—would've pushed his overall score to about 75, which would leave him just shy of the top 10 at his position. 

    146. Marreese Speights, Golden State Warriors

    69/100

    After spending the first five seasons of his career playing with the Philadelphia 76ers, Memphis Grizzlies and Cleveland Cavaliers, Speights finally looked as though he found a solid home in Golden State. He wasn't a heavily used member of the rotation, but he excelled when he was on the court, especially at times when he was allowed to create his own offense. 

145-141: Jack, Cole, Middleton, Lee, Splitter

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    145. Jarrett Jack, Cleveland Cavaliers

    69/100

    Giving Jack a four-year deal for $25 million, as the Cavs did this past offseason, was a mistake. But don't let an egregious salary detract from your evaluation of a valuable veteran guard who can provide a scoring boost off the bench. 

    144. Norris Cole, Miami Heat

    69/100

    Cole is one of the better backup guards in the Association. He's a self-aware player who understands it's not in his nature to take over games offensively, instead providing steady contributions and focusing his energy on the less-glamorous end of the court. 

    143. Khris Middleton, Milwaukee Bucks

    69/100

    Middleton didn't get many opportunities to thrive as a second-round pick for the Detroit Pistons in 2012-13. But he broke out after being traded to Milwaukee this past summer, showcasing a consistent three-point stroke that gave him the niche he needed to crack—and remain in—an NBA rotation. 

    142. Courtney Lee, Memphis Grizzlies

    69/100

    It should say a lot that Lee managed to displace Tony Allen from the starting lineup. He's a solid defender and an offensive contributor, one that Memphis sorely needed thanks to a complete dearth of quality outside shooting. He's by no means a star, but he's a star among role players. 

    141. Tiago Splitter, San Antonio Spurs

    69/100

    Apparently, Splitter's career didn't take a nosedive after he was brutally stuffed at the rim by LeBron James during the 2013 NBA Finals. The Brazilian big man's season was inhibited by his ability to stay healthy, but he did show improvement in virtually every facet of the game. He won't turn 30 until 2015, so there's still a bit of time before he starts losing the athleticism he currently possesses.  

140-136: Young, Henson, Barnes, Augustin, Redick

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    140. Nick Young, Los Angeles Lakers

    69/100

    Young has been one of the league's most valuable scorers off the bench, but he still needs to improve his all-around game if he hopes to gain an even bigger role. Though his on-ball defense was on point, more effort guarding someone without the rock would help, as would a willingness to distribute the ball to open teammates. Swaggy P should never change, but Nick Young should. 

    139. John Henson, Milwaukee Bucks

    69/100

    Henson was a shot-blocking menace, rebounding stud and solid offensive contributor while playing at Chapel Hill. The NBA has proved to be a bit of a reality check during his first two professional seasons, but the tools are all still there. Yet, for some reason, the Bucks seem awfully hesitant to take advantage of them on a consistent basis.  

    138. Matt Barnes, Los Angeles Clippers

    69/100

    Pigeonholed into a role in which he could play stellar defense, focusing the bulk of his attention on that end of the floor, Barnes excelled during the 2013-14 campaign. Although his offense regressed slightly from his first few seasons in the Staples Center, he still continued the late-season renaissance he's enjoyed ever since taking his talents to Hollywood. 

    137. D.J. Augustin, Chicago Bulls

    69/100

    So, who expected this? Augustin went from being a castoff in Toronto to finding a home and absolutely thriving for the Bulls, all in the course of the 2013-14 season. There's no award for in-season turnarounds, but he'd be a leading candidate if such an accolade existed. 

    136. J.J. Redick, Los Angeles Clippers

    69/100

    Redick might have enjoyed an even more impressive season if he'd been able to avoid the pesky clutches of the injury imp. But even with the back injury shortening his 2013-14 season, he was still able to showcase his offensive value, both as a spot-up shooter and as a capable ball-handling scoring threat. 

135-131: O'Neal, Turner, Davis, Morris, Allen

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    135. Jermaine O'Neal, Golden State Warriors

    70/100

    When he was healthy, O'Neal proved to be an impactful member of the Dubs' frontcourt. He was a consistent source of mediocre offensive production and stellar defense, while his single-game explosions tended to spark the team on rare occasions. A 23-point, 13-rebound outing against the Brooklyn Nets in late February was perhaps the best example. 

    134. Evan Turner, Indiana Pacers

    70/100

    The 2013-14 campaign was a mixed bag for Turner, who thrived as a centerpiece in Philadelphia before declining in his new yellow jersey. He should be a prized commodity once he hits the open market this summer, but expectations have to be tempered because his success was largely a result of the system in which he played as well as a lack of competition for minutes among teammates due to a sheer dearth of NBA-caliber players on the Philadelphia roster during the first half of the year. 

    133. Ed Davis, Memphis Grizzlies

    70/100

    A defensive stud who knows his limits on offense, Davis is eventually going to receive more minutes and begin to experience a bit of a breakout. He failed to stick with the Toronto Raptors at the start of his career, and the Grizzlies have yet to fully commit to seeing what he could offer in a more featured role. It'll happen at some point, though a new location might be needed once more. 

    132. Marcus Morris, Phoenix Suns

    70/100

    Although he was severely overshadowed by his twin, Markieff, this particular forward had a season to remember as well. Morris was granted fewer opportunities within the Phoenix rotation, but he managed to make them count by playing solid defense and consistently creating his own looks offensively. 

    131. Ray Allen, Miami Heat

    70/100

    The Heat's vaunted depth took a blow when Allen became a more limited player in 2013-14. Still capable of catching fire from beyond the arc, the future Hall of Famer was increasingly uninvolved and uncharacteristically struggled for long stretches of the season. He's still valuable, but he's not as valuable as he has been in the past. 

130-126: Green, Gordon, Bradley, Burke, Johnson

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    130. Draymond Green, Golden State Warriors

    70/100

    Green was an all-around stud during his career at Michigan State, but that didn't translate into anything more than a second-round selection in the 2012 NBA draft. However, the defensive spark plug has used his two professional seasons to emerge as a draft gem, thanks primarily to his contributions on the less glamorous end of the court. 

    129. Eric Gordon, New Orleans Pelicans

    70/100

    Gordon might be one of the most disappointing players in the NBA, assuming you still remember the 2010-11 campaign in which he averaged over 22 points per game for the Clippers. He still has a few years left to live up to his egregiously high salary before he hits the open market again, but the expectations now have to be severely lowered. 

    128. Avery Bradley, Boston Celtics

    70/100

    For the first time in his career, Bradley wasn't an offensive liability for Boston. He didn't exactly thrive as a scorer, much less as a distributor, but his shot improved to the point that he could be relied on for the occasional high-scoring exploits. 

    127. Trey Burke, Utah Jazz

    70/100

    The first point guard to earn a "passing" grade, Burke is only going to improve as he gains his sea legs with the Utah Jazz. A confident young player, he's still figuring out how to take advantage of his skills and make up for his weaknesses (namely his 6'0" frame and lack of elite shooting skills).  

    126. Amir Johnson, Toronto Raptors

    70/100

    Though Johnson gets less attention than a handful of players north of the border, he was still a consistent contributor for the upstart Raptors. His individual impact seems to fall in line with his overall profile, as it flies well under the radar but still holds quite a bit of value. 

125-121: Valanciunas, Hill, Mills, Livingston, Belinelli

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    125. Jonas Valanciunas, Toronto Raptors

    70/100

    At times during the 2013-14 campaign, it looked as though Valanciunas was going to be a draft bust. At other times, he looked like a future All-Star. The overall product leans more toward the latter than the former, but it's quite clear he's a bit behind his expected developmental curve.  

    124. Jordan Hill, Los Angeles Lakers

    71/100

    This particular big man should be known for more than his hairstyle—more players should go for the dreadlocks-and-headband look, but that's beside the point. He's an incredible rebounder who puts up efficient scoring numbers and delivers energy to the Los Angeles Lakers. Will that be enough for him to find a permanent home in Tinseltown?

    123. Patty Mills, San Antonio Spurs

    71/100

    Mills just keeps getting better and better in his role off the San Antonio bench. The Aussie is a vintage example of Gregg Popovich's ability to maximize the talents of relatively limited players, as he's turned into quite the offensive spark plug without being too much of a liability on the defensive end. 

    122. Shaun Livingston, Brooklyn Nets

    71/100

    That brutal knee injury Livingston suffered while playing for the Los Angeles Clippers back in 2007 is now but a distant memory. The 6'7" combo guard no longer possesses an inordinate amount of upside, but he's carved out a nice niche for himself with the Nets while establishing himself as a player for whom fans almost universally root. 

    121. Marco Belinelli, San Antonio Spurs

    71/100

    If you're looking for the perfect testament to Popovich's mastery on the sidelines, look no further than this swingman. Belinelli knew he was coming to a system that would maximize his offensive talent, and that's exactly what happened during the best year of his career.

120-116: Sullinger, Vucevic, Crawford, Sessions, Nelson

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    120. Jared Sullinger, Boston Celtics

    71/100

    Is Sullinger a keeper in the Boston frontcourt? There's not a definitive answer to that question yet, but the progression he showed throughout his sophomore season should have Danny Ainge leaning toward a positive reply. He has quite a long way to go on defense, but his ability to put up points and stretch the court is something sorely needed by the Celtics. 

    119. Nikola Vucevic, Orlando Magic

    71/100

    Still only 23 years old, Vucevic has plenty of time to live up to his lofty potential, but it's potential that is clearly limited by a lack of athleticism and an unwillingness to bang around down low as often as necessary. If he beefs up just a bit more, more mentally than physically, the extra toughness would pay large dividends.  

    118. Jordan Crawford, Golden State Warriors

    72/100

    While it's a shame that Crawford was traded away from Beantown just as he was growing comfortable in a distributing role, he's shown that he has the tools necessary to be a crucial backcourt cog down the road. The scoring confidence will always be there, and now the passing chops are, too. 

    117. Ramon Sessions, Milwaukee Bucks

    72/100

    Yes, Sessions is a backup. But he's an elite player off the bench when filled with confidence, as he can light up the scoreboard in short bursts with his outside shooting, all the while remaining a solid distributor. Even though he's just 28 years old, Sessions is a known commodity and should continue to function as such for years. 

    116. Jameer Nelson, Orlando Magic

    72/100

    Nelson is presumably in the process of being phased out by the Magic, serving as a mentor for Victor Oladipo before his contract expires and he hits the open market in 2015. But all the while, he continues to be an upper-tier placeholder with a nice offensive game. 

115-111: Foye, Vasquez, Hawes, Varejao, Boozer

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    115. Randy Foye, Denver Nuggets

    72/100

    It's amazing what happens when Tyrone Corbin isn't calling the shots. After escaping from his limited role with the Utah Jazz, Foye proved he was still a valuable commodity, one capable of improving into a quality supporting piece on the offensive end. 

    114. Greivis Vasquez, Toronto Raptors

    72/100

    It's amazing how far removed we already are from Vasquez's standout 2012-13 season. He's since been shipped off to the Kings, then the Raptors, and he's been unable to retain a starting gig in the latter destination. A valuable guard nonetheless, Vasquez continues to shine in his areas of strength. 

    113. Spencer Hawes, Cleveland Cavaliers

    72/100

    Hawes is perhaps the best example of a stretch 5 that we have in the NBA. Unfortunately, though, he's a bit too specialized, as he's not the most impressive player when his shot isn't falling. The 26-year-old probably won't break out at any point in the near or distant future, but his three-point stroke will continue to make him valuable.

    112. Anderson Varejao, Cleveland Cavaliers

    72/100

    Varejao will make $9.7 million next season before he hits the open market in the summer of 2015, and some clarity will be needed before the latter event. Was a disappointing 2013-14 season the result of injuries and a lack of opportunities, or was it the start of a permanent decline? It's impossible to be sure just yet. 

    111. Carlos Boozer, Chicago Bulls

    72/100

    This was the season that everyone got on the same page, recognizing that Boozer was putting up largely empty stats. He scored because no one else could, and his sole value often came on the boards. In fact, the Bulls were significantly worse on both ends of the court when he played, which means the word "amnesty" is going to be used quite often when his name is brought up this offseason. 

110-106: Knight, Carroll, Jones, Marshall, Chalmers

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    110. Brandon Knight, Milwaukee Bucks

    72/100

    Knight is still tracking in the right direction, and he should only improve next year when the Milwaukee Bucks aren't such a futile squad. Pairing him with a few more potent offensive players will only help draw away from the inordinate amounts of defensive attention he received in 2013-14. 

    109. DeMarre Carroll, Atlanta Hawks

    72/100

    One of the more underrated contributors in the Association—because, let's be real here, not many people watch the Al Horford-less Hawks—Carroll has become a nice glue guy who specializes on the defensive end. And with a developing three-point stroke, he now qualifies as a three-and-D player. 

    108. Terrence Jones, Houston Rockets

    72/100

    Going into the 2013-14 season, power forward was viewed as a huge weakness for the Rockets. But thanks to the emergence of Jones, who provided them with solid defense, great rebounding and efficient offense, the hole was filled, thereby alleviating one of the roster's main worries. 

    107. Kendall Marshall, Los Angeles Lakers

    73/100

    Is there any reason he can't be a left-handed version of in-his-prime Andre Miller? Marshall will always lack foot speed, and shooting is a work in progress, but he's a heady player with insane court vision. That's a great set of building blocks for any young floor general. 

    106. Mario Chalmers, Miami Heat

    73/100

    Chalmers is exactly the right point guard to play with a Big Three. He doesn't do more than he's capable of, and he thrives in his role as a spot-up shooter, occasional ball-handler and solid defender. Maybe Chalmers would do better as more of a lead player, but his career has gone quite swimmingly thus far. 

105-101: Lin, Tucker, Meeks, Henderson, Green

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    105. Jeremy Lin, Houston Rockets

    73/100

    While the Jeremy Lin who excelled with the New York Knicks is now a distant memory, it's become abundantly clear that the Harvard product has a long future in the NBA. He's already a great role-playing offensive producer, and there's still plenty of time left before he hits his true athletic prime.

    104. P.J. Tucker, Phoenix Suns

    73/100

    It's players like Tucker who can change the fortunes of a franchise on a single-season basis. He's not a superstar and never will be, but by emerging as a contributing rotation member who makes above-average contributions in multiple areas, Tucker can swing at least a few games. 

    103. Jodie Meeks, Los Angeles Lakers

    73/100

    Mike D'Antoni is great at making role players seem like something more, but Meeks is here to stay as a quality rotation member. It was his development around the basket that allowed him to break into a new realm of value, not three-point shooting enhanced by a coach's system.  

    102. Gerald Henderson, Charlotte Bobcats

    73/100

    The perimeter shooting—or lack thereof—still makes Henderson a limited player, but he's been a valuable commodity for the upstart 'Cats. Solid on-ball defense and an attacking mentality when his team has the ball have both aided him rather significantly. 

    101. Jeff Green, Boston Celtics

    73/100

    So much for the All-Star potential Green flashed in 2012-13. He was an adequate featured player for Boston, but his scoring was exposed and his defense suffered due to the extra energy he was forced into using on the offensive end of the court. 

100-96: Harris, Oladipo, Lopez, Garnett, Calderon

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    100. Tobias Harris, Orlando Magic

    73/100

    For the second year in a row, Harris excelled after the All-Star break, though he struggled—relatively—before it. Is his career doomed to this "one step backward, one step forward" trend, or is this just a strange coincidence? It's too soon to tell, though the Magic should be paying close attention to the beginning of the next campaign, which just so happens to be a contract year for the 21-year-old forward. 

    99. Victor Oladipo, Orlando Magic

    73/100

    Just imagine how dangerous Oladipo is going to be when he develops a jumper. And given his work ethic, it does seem like more of a "when" than an "if." The defensive tools and athleticism are already there in spades. 

    98. Robin Lopez, Portland Trail Blazers

    73/100

    Lopez is by no means a glamorous player, but he gets the job done for Portland. When he's on the court, Rip City can count on solid rebounding numbers, having a defensive presence on the interior and getting offense from an efficient source who won't try to do too much. He's a great example of a player who's maximizing his physical gifts. 

    97. Kevin Garnett, Brooklyn Nets

    73/100

    When the decline comes, it comes hard and fast. Such was the case for KG this year, as he was troubled by the ill effects of Father Time and the pesky injury imp who so often travel in tandem. His first season with the Brooklyn Nets—and potentially his last—just didn't let him spend as much time on the court as he would have liked, and his leadership skills were often relegated to the bench. 

    96. Jose Calderon, Dallas Mavericks

    73/100

    Even though he's 32 years old and moving out of his athletic prime, Calderon is a point guard who makes Dennis Green proud. He's exactly who we've always thought he is—a pesky player who thrives as an efficient shooter. 

95-91: Gortat, Nene, Beverley, Burks, Dunleavy

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    95. Marcin Gortat, Washington Wizards

    73/100

    Gortat was a big difference-maker for the Wizards after he was acquired in a trade right before the start of the season. His defensive presence and ability to connect on efficient looks around the rim both gave the team new elements, helping to steer it into the playoffs for the first time since Gilbert Arenas, Antawn Jamison and Caron Butler were leading the Wiz in 2007-08. 

    94. Nene, Washington Wizards

    73/100

    Although he doesn't get much credit and too many basketball fans are unaware of his last name (Hilario), Nene remained a valuable contributor this year for the Wizards, who finally found their way to the promised land. He wasn't healthy for much of the season, but he was a veteran presence on a young teamone who provided great defense and a steady dose of offense.  

    93. Patrick Beverley, Houston Rockets

    73/100

    This former second-round pick should always wear the mask he donned during the middle of the season, one that made him look like he was coming straight out of a horror movie. That represents his style of play perfectly—physical, unrelenting, tenacious and terrifying, at least to opposing ball-handlers. 

    92. Alec Burks, Utah Jazz

    74/100

    Has Burks lived up to the expectations associated with being a lottery pick in the 2011 NBA draft? Not really, but he's getting better and better as his career progresses and becoming a valuable part of the Utah Jazz rotation. This season wasn't truly special, but it was nothing to scoff at either. 

    91. Mike Dunleavy, Chicago Bulls

    74/100

    The Chicago swingman used the 2013-14 campaign to establish himself as one of the more underrated commodities in the NBA. He wasn't supposed to do much more than spread the floor when he was whisked away from the Milwaukee Bucks this past offseason, but he did a lot more than that

90-86: Evans, Marion, Korver, Pekovic, Bogut

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    90. Tyreke Evans, New Orleans Pelicans

    74/100

    Evans just needs to find stability so he can eventually climb back up the ranks—both the overall ones and the positional ones. After a ridiculously good rookie season in 2009-10, the Memphis product has continuously declined thanks to shifting positions, changing coaches/teammates and an undefined role.

    89. Shawn Marion, Dallas Mavericks

    74/100

    Can you imagine how bad the Dallas defense would've been if Marion hadn't been able to stay on the court for the vast majority of the season? Even if he's no longer the fantasy basketball superstar he was in his prime, The Matrix still does all the little—and big—things for the Mavericks, just not in remarkably high volume. 

    88. Kyle Korver, Atlanta Hawks

    74/100

    It's easy to call Korver a shooting specialist, but doing so would be a mistake. His perimeter sniping is easily his best attribute, but he's also a solid passer who does an adequate job on the less glamorous end of the court. Korver could easily be a liability there, but he refuses to let that happen. 

    87. Nikola Pekovic, Minnesota Timberwolves

    74/100

    Even though the Minnesota Timberwolves gave Pekovic a big contract (five years, $60 million) this past offseason, it's tough to see him remaining a crucial part of their plans so long as Kevin Love is on the team as well. The T-Wolves can't afford to have two rim-protecting liabilities on the floor, so either Pekovic gets better or someone else will take his place and attempt to replicate his physicality and offensive prowess.  

    86. Andrew Bogut, Golden State Warriors

    74/100

    When Bogut actually works, he's a dominant defensive force who sucks in rebounds like a vacuum cleaner and provides limited offensive contributions. Unfortunately for the Dubs, though, he doesn't always work. He hasn't played anything even resembling a full campaign since the 2007-08 season, his third in the Association. 

85-81: Hinrich, Jackson, Collison, Green, Martin

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    85. Kirk Hinrich, Chicago Bulls

    75/100

    It's hard to fault Hinrich for knowing exactly whom he is and acting accordingly. The veteran is a perimeter marksman who handles the ball well and can make a significant defensive impact for the Bulls night in and night out. Nothing more, and nothing less. 

    84. Reggie Jackson, Oklahoma City Thunder

    75/100

    Jackson has blossomed into an offensive threat who can function as a sixth man or a spot-starter at either guard position. He's a valuable piece in the Thunder's championship-contending roster, and they're lucky to have him on such a cheap deal until the close of next season. Then he's invariably going to get paid some big bucks, assuming he continues his positive developmental trends on both ends. 

    83. Darren Collison, Los Angeles Clippers

    75/100

    The Clippers could've declined rather significantly while Chris Paul was injured, but Collison made sure that wouldn't happen. Whether he's been in the starting five or coming off the bench to replace either a point guard or shooting guard, he's served as exactly the type of offensive spark plug that this elite Western Conference team needed. 

    82. Danny Green, San Antonio Spurs

    75/100

    If you expected Green to continue breaking out after his exemplary performance in the NBA Finals last year, you were sorely mistaken. The swingman has continued to play well, but he hasn't been much more than an elite "three-and-D" player. That said, there's quite a bit of value in that. 

    81. Kevin Martin, Minnesota Timberwolves

    75/100

    Martin continues to cement himself as a secondary scorer, even though he's now starting to move out of his prime. Given his three-point shooting and ability to work his way to the free-throw line before sinking those ensuing foul shots, the shooting guard remains an efficient point producer capable of exploding for gaudy totals every once in a while. 

80-76: Favors, Pierce, Matthews, Green, Morris

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    80. Derrick Favors, Utah Jazz

    75/100

    Sometimes, it's hard to remember that Favors is only 22 years old. He may have four seasons under his belt now, but he's an inexperienced player still trying to figure out how to make the most of his starting opportunity. The rebounding is there, but the more glamorous pieces are still in the process of being honed. This should be the worst ranking Favors earns in the next couple of years, though, as he still oozes potential.  

    79. Paul Pierce, Brooklyn Nets

    75/100

    Pierce shifted from a featured role with the C's to a system that distributed the ball among nearly every player on the court. It depressed his overall value—something that likely wouldn't have happened had he remained in that featured spot—but The Truth was by no means a bad player in 2013-14. He remained an efficient offensive contributor and a solid, albeit underrated, defender whenever he stepped onto the court. 

    78. Markieff Morris, Phoenix Suns

    75/100

    It's not often that a single player puts himself in contention for two major awards (Most Improved Player and Sixth Man of the Year), but that's exactly what this Morris twin did during his breakout season with the Suns. Not only did he grow leaps and bounds on offense, but he provided some of the league's most valuable contributions off the bench. 

    77. Wesley Matthews, Portland Trail Blazers

    75/100

    Although the Blazers managed to shock the world—especially early on in the season's proceedings—that wasn't due to a complete explosion from Matthews. He did manage to improve and become an even more valuable player, but his defensive reputation was a bit overblown when compared to other standout stoppers. 

    76. Gerald Green, Phoenix Suns

    75/100

    Green was easily one of the most improved players in the Association, showcasing a stellar stroke from the perimeter and maintaining the springs-for-legs athleticism that has allowed him to thrive for limited stretches in the past. He was one of the true keys to Phoenix's remarkable season. 

75-71: Butler, Beal, Gibson, Jennings, Hill

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    75. Jimmy Butler, Chicago Bulls

    75/100

    Was Jimmy Butler overhyped going into the season? Absolutely, but don't let that detract from your evaluation of the promising, young 2-guard. He's an incredible defensive player who's still getting his sea legs on offense, and the Bulls should feel lucky to have control of his services going forward. 

    74. Bradley Beal, Washington Wizards

    75/100

    It's hard to believe that Beal still won't be able to legally consume adult beverages until late June. He's already finished two seasons in the NBA and established himself as a high-quality offensive contributor, but he's nowhere near reaching his lofty ceiling. Keep following this kid. 

    73. Taj Gibson, Chicago Bulls

    75/100

    In the past, Gibson was a high-upside player who specialized at defense. But this season, he developed quite a few offensive skills, showing both that his ceiling may ultimately be even higher than previously thought and that he's starting to get within reaching distance of it. 

    72. Brandon Jennings, Detroit Pistons

    76/100

    The southpaw has flashes of brilliance every once in a while, ones that remind us of the precocious rookie who scored 55 points in the seventh game of his NBA career. But they're too few and far between, and the lack of consistency diminishes what is otherwise a still-promising talent.

    71. George Hill, Indiana Pacers

    76/100

    Solid. That's the best word to describe Hill, who is in the perfect situation to thrive with the Pacers. He's not asked to overexert his limited scoring and distributing talents, but he's instead able to play efficient offensive basketball while focusing on his defense and rebounding. 

70. Dion Waiters, Shooting Guard, Cleveland Cavaliers

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    Scoring

    20/25

    Dion Waiters is going to be an elite scorer one day, but he has to figure out when to be aggressive and when to tone it down. He started to do exactly that during the second half of the 2013-14 season, especially when Kyrie Irving was out of the lineup. Waiters has all the tools to thrive on this end, but they've rarely been taken out of the shed at the same time. 

    Non-Scoring Offense

    15/20

    A tremendous off-ball threat with a knack for both cutting and spotting up, Waiters is quite adept at drawing defensive attention away from a teammate with the rock. He's also a solid passer, capable of making both simple and flashy deliveries as he attacks the basket. Once he cuts back on the turnovers, he'll look even better. 

    Defense

    30/40

    While the Syracuse product can play adequate on-ball defense, he often helps out teammates and makes rotations like he's wearing ear plugs. There just isn't much communication, which means the shooting guard is often out of position and unable to up the Cleveland Cavaliers' chances of preventing points. 

    Rebounding

    3/5

    If you just look at Waiters' rebounding numbers, it would be awfully hard to distinguish him from many other 2-guards throughout the Association. And yes, that applies to his per-game numbers, per-minute marks, percentages and SportVU stats. 

    Intangibles

    8/10

    Clashes with teammates. Benchings by Mike Brown due to a lack of effort. Plenty of frustration. Waiters has the talent, but his intangibles weren't all that great during a difficult season with the Cavs. 

    Overall

    76/100

    Waiters is a roller-coaster ride for the Cavaliers. During both his rookie and sophomore seasons, he was incredibly frustrating before the All-Star Game before breaking out in a big way after it. If he ever figures out how to maintain that performance for a whole season, the All-Star break might not be, well, a break. 

69. Vince Carter, Swingman, Dallas Mavericks

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    Scoring

    16/22

    Vince Carter just refuses to go away, as this season cemented his role as a three-point shooter who would occasionally attack the basket and either finish the play in emphatic fashion or draw contact and convert at the charity stripe. His athleticism is more spotty than it was in his prime, but by relying on his strengths and refusing to live in the past, he's staved off a serious scoring decline. 

    Non-Scoring Offense

    10/20

    Carter isn't a terrifying sight when he's spotting up, but he's actually earning points in this category for his cutting and facilitating skills, which have both improved as he's aged. Though he's no longer capable of recording double-digit assists like he did in his prime, he's become increasingly careful and smart with the ball. 

    Defense

    34/40

    If you look solely at Vinsanity's defensive rating, you'll be confused. It's a context-dependent statone that doesn't account for him trying to make up for the liabilities in the starting lineup while shutting down ball-handlers and forcing them to exploit other matchups. 

    Rebounding

    6/8

    Every once in a while, Carter soars into the air for a vintage rebound that requires athleticism which is more characteristic of the Gerald Greens of the world. But even when he's not reminding us of his Half-Man, Half-Amazing days, Carter is an asset on the glass for the Dallas Mavericks, particularly on the offensive end. 

    Intangibles

    10/10

    There has been no pouting, whining or pleas for a change of scenery. Instead, Carter has done everything in his power to win basketball games while making the most of his waning physical gifts. 

    Overall

    76/100

    Watching Carter defy Father Time has been one of the more enjoyable aspects of the 2013-14 season. The 37-year-old refuses to become the bane of Dallas' efforts and is instead doing everything he can to play smart basketball at all times. 

68. Michael Carter-Williams, Point Guard, Philadelphia 76ers

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    Scoring

    16/20

    Michael Carter-Williams' scoring prowess declined after he shocked the world at the start of his rookie campaign, but he still spent his first go-round in the Association proving he could do more than excel in transition. A lanky athlete who has no fear attacking the rim, MCW was able to put up points in bunches. Now he desperately needs an outside shot to complement his driving game. 

    Non-Scoring Offense

    16/25

    Not much of an off-ball shooting threat, MCW functioned as a capable cutter and tremendous distributor throughout his first season with the Philadelphia 76ers. While turnovers popped up too often, it's still impressive to generate more than a handful of assists per game while playing with a collection of D-League talents and a few legitimate NBA players. 

    Defense

    31/40

    If the Sixers' tanking ways were bad for one aspect of Carter-Williams' game, it would be this one. He was given free rein to gamble incessantly, even when those risks came at the expense of the team's overall efforts. As a result, he racked up steals but failed to develop all of the defensive fundamentals he'll need to thrive down the road, especially as he transitions out of that vaunted Syracuse zone mentality. 

    Rebounding

    5/5

    Those long arms and 6'6" frame help quite a bit. MCW had a better rebounding season than any other point guard in the league—gaining a slight edge over Russell Westbrook and Rajon Rondo because of games played—and there was even an 11-contest stretch in March that saw him average 9.5 boards per outing.

    Intangibles

    8/10

    Maybe the Sixers kept him out of the lineup a bit too often, knowing that his presence on the court would only add the undesired winning outcomes. Regardless, MCW missed a significant amount of time during his rookie campaign, failing to suit up due to a shoulder injury and a knee problem that led to infection. 

    Overall

    76/100

    At the beginning of the 2013-14 season, MCW looked like a future All-Star. After running into the rookie wall and seeing his shooting percentages follow an Icarian route, it's time to temper those expectations. Carter-Williams has that type of potential, but there are plenty of glaring flaws he'll need to fix in the coming years. 

67. Jamal Crawford, Shooting Guard, Los Angeles Clippers

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    Scoring

    22/25

    The dribbling. Oh, the dribbling. Jamal Crawford is so incredibly potent off the bounce thanks to those flashy handles that have basically made his career. They allow him both to create separation on the perimeter and to drive into the teeth of the defense where he either finishes or draws contact. 

    Non-Scoring Offense

    14/20

    You'd think a 34-year-old veteran who has spent plenty of time throughout his career running the point would be a quality distributor. But you'd be wrong. Crawford just doesn't often look to pass, instead doing everything he can to create his own shot and heat up. On the flip side, though, he's just about as threatening as an off-ball presence gets at this position. 

    Defense

    29/40

    The Los Angeles Clippers often have to hide Crawford on lesser offensive players, because he can be taken to school and taught a few lessons if he ever gets caught in a one-on-one situation. His off-ball work is passable, but disaster often results when he's asked to guard someone in isolation. 

    Rebounding

    2/5

    Rebounds? What are those? Crawford averages just over three rebounding opportunities per game. Not actual rebounds, but opportunities. 

    Intangibles

    9/10

    While he's a quality leader who gets crowds and teammates excited, Crawford wasn't able to remain healthy throughout 2013-14. A strained left calf and Achilles injury knocked him out of the lineup down the stretch. 

    Overall

    76/100

    One of the best bench scorers in basketball, Crawford remained the same player he's been for years—a dynamic shot creator who can heat up like he's a microwave set on high. His ability to create offense for himself is not only helpful to the LAC cause, but it also makes for a highly entertaining spectacle when the dribbles start getting fancier and fancier. 

66. Ricky Rubio, Point Guard, Minnesota Timberwolves

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    Scoring

    12/20

    Ricky Rubio is a pretty atrocious shooter, but he's at least able to put points up on the board. The Spaniard is fairly adept at drawing contract and getting to the line, and his three-point stroke isn't awful when he's given space by the defense. Still, scoring isn't exactly a strength for this third-year member of the Minnesota Timberwolves.  

    Non-Scoring Offense

    19/25

    This category brings out the best and worst of Rubio. On one hand, he's such a non-threat as an off-ball scorer that defenses can essentially forget about him and play five-on-four basketball. But facilitating also matters here, and few are better at racking up assists. Some of the angles Rubio sees make you sit and wonder if he's operating on a different set of geometric rules than the typical Euclidian ones. 

    Defense

    30/40

    Does Rubio rack up steals like a kid in a candy store? Absolutely, but don't let that fool you into thinking he's an elite defender. The Minnesota floor general has a gambling addiction and usually looks completely lost when he's not being asked to guard a straight-up isolation set. Whether he's going under/over a pick or chasing a man without the ball, it usually doesn't end well.

    Rebounding

    5/5

    Rubio is unquestionably one of the best rebounding point guards in the business. Not only does he crash the boards frequently, but he's able to grab the ball away from bigger players surprisingly often. While Minnesota's floor general might pick and choose his spots, he does so quite well. 

    Intangibles

    10/10

    There's nothing to complain about here, as Rubio seems to play with a contagious joie de vivre. And since recovering from his ACL tear during his rookie season and taking time into his sophomore campaign to recover, he's been the very picture of health in the Minnesota lineup. 

    Overall

    76/100

    There just aren't many point guards like Rubio. An elite distributor with lackluster shooting skills, he's very much an old-school player going to work in a new-school game. It works for now, but Rubio has to get better as a scorer if he's going to make any sort of leap in the future. 

65. Thaddeus Young, Power Forward, Philadelphia 76ers

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    Scoring

    16/20

    Even though defenses were able to key in on him significantly more often in 2013-14, Thaddeus Young's three-point shot allowed him to remain a valuable scorer. There's still plenty of work to be done on that front, but the ability to knock down over one triple per game made the athletic forward into far more than a homing missile with sights set on the rim. 

    Non-Scoring Offense

    11/15

    Between his aggressive cuts and willingness to fire away from downtown, Young emerged as a big-time off-ball threat for the reeling Philadelphia 76ers. He wasn't particularly effective night in and night out, but defenses were forced to pay him mind out of fear that he could explode and cement an embarrassing fate that night. 

    Defense

    29/40

    Young might have been overmatched against bigger power forwards, but his quickness and anticipation allowed him to look like a solid off-ball defender. Of course, the fact that Philly let him be overly aggressive and basically forget about playing defense at the rim helped as well. 

    Rebounding

    10/15

    Aggression seems to apply to every facet of Young's game. The glass was no exception, as he often went through other bodies en route to where a missed shot would end up, and he did everything in his power to create as many rebounding opportunities as possible. 

    Intangibles

    10/10

    There were rumors early in the year that Young wanted out of Philadelphia. Then there were rumors that he felt left behind when Spencer Hawes and Evan Turner were traded away at the deadline. But through it all, Young kept playing hard and staying healthy. 

    Overall

    76/100

    Though the Georgia Tech product couldn't lead his team to victory after victory as a featured option, he proved that he was more than a transition/cutting threat who played lackluster defense. His offensive repertoire expanded in 2013-14, and he proved that he's valuable enough to remain a part of what should be a quicker-than-expected rebuild in the City of Brotherly Love. 

64. Kenneth Faried, Power Forward, Denver Nuggets

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    USA TODAY Sports

    Scoring

    16/20

    Kenneth Faried occasionally fancies himself a mid-range shooter, but he's at his best when fully committed to an unrelenting assault on the basket. During the second half of the season, the long-haired power forward suddenly had all the pieces click, and he became a valuable and efficient scorer for the Denver Nuggets, one who could get to the rim at will and finish a surprising number of post moves. 

    Non-Scoring Offense

    10/15

    Faried is only an adequate passer, and calling him a stretch 4 would be a laughable statement. But he still has value when he's not scoring because he sets good, hard, solid screens while forcing defenses to account for his whereabouts at all times. Lose sight of Faried for even a split second, and you'll easily find him again. He'll just be hanging on the rim and getting ready to run back to the other end of the court. 

    Defense

    27/40

    This is still a work in progress for the Morehead State product, as he often seems disengaged when he's not guarding a man with his back to the basket or working in isolation. Faried is also a bit too aggressive when trying to block shots. He has some fantastic results (am I right, Dion Waiters?), but he also gets caught out of position and fouls too often when trying to protect the hoop. 

    Rebounding

    14/15

    Of course college basketball's leading rebounder over the past 40 years is going to be a quality player on the boards in the Association. His slightly undersized frame (6'8", 228 lbs) can prevent him from recording gaudy totals against bigger matchups, but he can generally be relied upon for right around eight or nine boards any given night. 

    Intangibles

    9/10

    Faried wasn't pleased with Brian Shaw's schemes early in the season, sometimes clashing internally with the first-year head coach. But he controlled himself, keeping that omnipresent smile plastered across his face, and eventually came around to his coach's teachings before creating any sort of actual problems. 

    Overall

    76/100

    After stagnating early in the year and making it seem as though he wasn't a part of Denver's future, Faried exploded after the All-Star break. It was perfect timing, as he's up for an extension soon and will presumably get a big one after flashing extremely high potential quite often down the stretch. If his defense can improve in 2014-15, you're looking at a guy who will rank far higher next year. 

63. Rajon Rondo, Point Guard, Boston Celtics

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    Scoring

    13/20

    Rajon Rondo's three-point stroke, while much improved from where it's been in the past, is still pretty awful. And the rest of his scoring game hasn't made up for the flaw, as the Boston Celtics floor general has struggled to put up points since returning from his ACL tear. Rondo would typically earn a slightly higher score in this category, but his shooting hasn't been pretty since coming back from such a major injury.  

    Non-Scoring Offense

    21/25

    Although he isn't much of an off-ball threat thanks to the complete lack of a consistent jumper, Rondo is still one of the best distributors in basketball. His passing numbers are right up where they were before the ACL woes, particularly because he's never been better at minimizing turnovers since first being thrust into a a featured role early in his career. Whether or not he's at full strength, Rondo is one of the best assist men in the Association. 

    Defense

    31/40

    Rondo is typically one of the standout defenders at his position. In fact, he put together four All-Defensive seasons in a row before missing the honor due to missed games in 2012-13. Since returning from the ACL tear, he's been a fantastic on-ball defender, but a lack of mobility has prevented him from making much of an impact in the off-ball category. Chalk this one up to circumstance, and expect Rondo to bounce back in a big way during the 2014-15 campaign. 

    Rebounding

    5/5

    Well, there's been no decline here. Rondo just keeps piling up the rebounds as well as any point guard in basketball, just as he has for years. The combination of instincts, vision and long arms serves the 28-year-old floor general quite well. 

    Intangibles

    6/10

    Don't make the mistake of thinking Rondo loses a point here because he chose to attend a birthday party rather than support his team. That was interesting but overblown. More problematic is the surly nature and lack of bonding with most teammates. Oh, and the whole missing well over half the season thing. 

    Overall

    76/100

    Remember, this ranking is based solely on the 2013-14 season. Rondo's grade is hindered by missed time and numbers that understandably declined as he tried to work himself back to peak form. When healthy, the Boston 1-guard is easily a top-10 point guard in the Association, and that's a spot he'll almost certainly regain in 2014-15.  

62. Josh Smith, Combo Forward, Detroit Pistons

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    USA TODAY Sports

    Scoring

    14/20

    It's inconceivable that such a physically gifted player could have such awful shot selection. Josh Smith should attack the rim whenever possible, but instead he's convinced himself that he's a jump-shooter, and the results are horrific. Though he can still put up points in bunches when he plays the right way, it's impossible to overlook the fact that among every qualified player in NBA history who has taken over three triples per game, only Antoine Walker (1999-00) shot a worse percentage from beyond the arc. 

    Non-Scoring Offense

    8/17

    Though Smith can't shoot spot-up jumpers—well, he can shoot them; he just can't make them—he's an athletic cutter who constantly keeps defenses on their toes. Nobody wants to end up on a poster, after all. Additionally, Smoove is a good passer, but he commits too many turnovers to be considered great. 

    Defense

    35/40

    Even though the Detroit Pistons weren't a particularly effective defensive squad, it's tough to pin the blame on Smith. He protected the rim extremely well for a combo forward, and his off-ball defense was quite excellent. Smoove always had an innate ability to travel around the half-court set at high speeds, blocking shots, stealing passes and wreaking havoc. A new location didn't change that. 

    Rebounding

    12/13

    As a 6'9", 225-pound combo forward who can jump through the roof, Smith is definitely able to make an impact on the boards. Although his numbers aren't particularly impressive, they look far better in context. Smith spent his time playing next to Andre Drummond (the best rebounder in basketball this season) and Greg Monroe, and he still managed to convert quite a few opportunities. 

    Intangibles

    8/10

    Is refusing to play the right brand of basketball bad for your team? Absolutely, which is one of the reasons Smith's on-court conduct suffered. At some point, a player has to be held accountable for his complete and utter unwillingness to play intelligent, beneficial basketball. 

    Overall

    77/100

    In terms of raw potential, Smith is still an All-Star talent. There's a chance he could actually make the Midseason Classic next season, though the percentages are dwindling now that he's 28 years old and still refusing to listen to the critics. And at this point, there are a lot of them. 

61. Rudy Gay, Combo Forward, Sacramento Kings

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    USA TODAY Sports

    Scoring

    18/20

    Rudy Gay was an awfully overrated scorer with the Toronto Raptors when he couldn't even shoot above 40 percent, basketball's version of the Mendoza Line. But once he was traded to the Sacramento Kings, he suddenly became one of the best scorers in basketball, upping his per-game average despite taking more than three fewer shots per game. 

    Non-Scoring Offense

    9/17

    Gay still isn't a potent spot-up threat. In fact, his improvements in Sacramento came largely because he stopped shooting the three-ball. However, he's an athletic and intelligent cutter who can also distribute the ball out quite nicely among his teammates. If only he could do so without coughing it up, though. 

    Defense

    31/40

    While Gay has the physical tools to excel as a defender (and he does when greeted with a man-to-man situation), he lacks the discipline necessary to thrive off the ball. The combo forward was especially susceptible to spot-up shooters, and he often loafed on the less glamorous end, failing to exert the energy required to get involved. 

    Rebounding

    9/13

    Gay is a solid rebounder. Nothing less, and nothing more. He can be relied upon for more than a handful of boards during any given game, and they'll generally come on both types of glass, even if he doesn't excel on either. 

    Intangibles

    10/10

    Although he was a negative offensive contributor north of the border and even banned box scores from the Toronto locker room, Gay was more of a punchline than a distraction. Then he went to Sac-Town and became a much better teammate, staying healthy all the while. 

    Overall

    77/100

    The Raptors may have improved quite a bit when Gay was traded away to the Kings, but the combo forward improved dramatically as well. He started taking the right shots, allowing him to live up to his lofty two-way potential for the first time since he left the Memphis Grizzlies. Perhaps it won't look too awful now if he decides to opt into the final year of his deal, which just happens to be worth over $19 million. 

60. Joe Johnson, Swingman, Brooklyn Nets

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    USA TODAY Sports

    Scoring

    17/22

    Joe Johnson did everything he could to lead the scoring charge for the Brooklyn Nets this year, but there were just too many mouths to feed. Even though he was fairly efficient thanks to his three-point stroke and isolation play, the volume just wasn't high enough for him to truly dominate this category. 

    Non-Scoring Offense

    14/20

    A tremendously dangerous scorer off the ball, Johnson forces defenses to keep their eyes on him at all times. He can easily hit shots from the perimeter if left open, and he's such a savvy cutter—thanks to his veteran experience and scoring smarts—that even the tiniest lapses by opposing defenses result in buckets. 

    Defense

    32/40

    Johnson has always been a solid defensive player, particularly when he was thriving with the Atlanta Hawks, and that hasn't changed now that he's well into his 30s. Apparently, Iso Joe applies to both ends of the court. 

    Rebounding

    4/8

    This particular swingman is better than his per-game numbers indicate, as they're rather pedestrian. Standing at 6'8", Johnson has more size than most players at his position, and he takes advantage of that by constantly attacking the glass and trying his darnedest to compile as many rebounding chances as possible. 

    Intangibles

    10/10

    Not only has Johnson stayed healthy throughout the 2013-14 season (a rarity for these Nets), but he's also been motivated to turn the lackluster season around. Rather than sulking and showing a distinct lack of enthusiasm, as he did at the end of his tenure with Atlanta, he's been passionate through and through. 

    Overall

    77/100

    Even though Johnson had a fine season, it's still a bit ridiculous that he was named an All-Star, even in the weak Eastern Conference. Not only is there a non-All-Star ahead of him at his own position in these rankings, but Johnson's overall ranking—the one for which positions don't matter—isn't indicative of a Midseason Classic nod. 

59. Trevor Ariza, Small Forward, Washington Wizards

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    Scoring

    15/20

    Trevor Ariza basically proved that it was possible to remain on fire over the course of an entire NBA season. He was unconscious from beyond the arc from start to finish, and his work inside the perimeter wasn't too shabby either. If he were just a bit better from mid-range zones, he'd be a truly dangerous scoring threat. 

    Non-Scoring Offense

    10/20

    You simply can't leave Ariza open in the corners. His above-the-break shooting is terrifying enough, but he really makes defenses pay when he sneaks away to the most efficient areas outside the paint. The small forward's passing could stand to improve, but it does remain somewhat adequate. 

    Defense

    33/40

    Ariza's defensive reputation gives him a bit too much credit. Then again, his numbers also sell him a little short. He's often asked to cover for lesser defenders, and the haphazard nature of his positioning can make him a bit prone to mental lapses. Above all else, the Washington Wizards are far better at preventing points when he plays. 

    Rebounding

    9/10

    It's tough to find small forwards who are better at rebounding than Ariza, but it is possible. He's just an incredibly consistent player on the boards who can be counted on for a handful of successful haul-ins each time he receives significant run. 

    Intangibles

    10/10

    Ariza is a vocal leader who also happens to set an example with his actions. One of the reasons he's so valuable to the Wizards is his ability to serve as a mentor for the young players who figure so heavily into Washington's future. 

    Overall

    77/100

    About as unheralded a player as you'll find in this section of the rankings, Ariza deserves a lot more recognition than he receives outside of the D.C. area. A tremendous locker room asset who provides steady contributions on both ends of the court, this small forward was a large part of the reason Washington experienced so much success in 2013-14. 

58. Luol Deng, Small Forward, Cleveland Cavaliers

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    USA TODAY Sports

    Scoring

    16/20

    Luol Deng was much more effective as an oft-used scoring threat with the Chicago Bulls than a tertiary piece with the Cleveland Cavaliers. His three-point shot deserted him in both locations, but he attacked the basket significantly more often in his first home, allowing him to remain fairly efficient by virtue of easy looks at the rim and shots from the charity stripe. 

    Non-Scoring Offense

    9/20

    There's not much reason to fear Deng off the ball. He's struggled as a cutter now that his age is starting to creep up near 30, and his shot isn't threatening enough to garner much attention. When he's not scoring, his lone source of offensive impact comes as a distributor, and he even struggled in that area with Cleveland. 

    Defense

    34/40

    At least this has remained steady throughout a tumultuous 2013-14 campaign. Deng excels as a shutdown wing defender, especially when opponents make the mistake of trying to post him up. That's just a recipe for disaster, although it's not exactly easy to find a method of attack that leaves the small forward all that vulnerable. 

    Rebounding

    9/10

    It's tough to find a better offensive rebounder at the 3 than Deng. He's a master at flying in, working around defenders and earning his team another possession after a missed shot. Though his work on the defensive glass declined when he was traded, he's so good in this area that he still receives a high score. 

    Intangibles

    9/10

    Deng's Achilles problems haven't kept him out for many games, but they have severely impacted his play. That's probably the best explanation for his post-trade decline, as Deng is too passionate to suddenly stop trying because he's playing for a team without a shot at a title. 

    Overall

    77/100

    Chicago Deng would've been either the No. 3 or No. 4 small forward in the NBA, as well as a player with the potential to rank in the top 30. Cleveland Deng isn't even a top-10 player at his position. And here's the average, though I suspect he'll rebound rather nicely when he's fully healthy. 

57. Arron Afflalo, Swingman, Orlando Magic

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    USA TODAY Sports

    Scoring

    19/22

    Arron Afflalo was completely dominant before the All-Star break (19.4 points on 46.3 percent shooting), but he fell off a bit during the second half of the season. He couldn't maintain his success inside the arc, which led to a declining scoring average. This was more of a regression to the mean than anything else, as Afflalo is a top-notch scoring threat but not a truly elite one. 

    Non-Scoring Offense

    16/20

    Of all the qualified swingmen—a group of 33 players, 17 of which made the top 200 overall—only Afflalo received a perfect score for off-ball offense. He's a potent shooter, one who threatens each and every defense he faces, and he excels in spot-up situations. On top of that, he's a deadly cutter when he chooses to use that skill. 

    Defense

    29/40

    Afflalo hasn't become the two-way stud many expected him to morph into back when he was with the Denver Nuggets. His on-ball defense is spectacular, but he can struggle to position himself in the right spots when he's working off the ball and trying to cut off passing lanes. 

    Rebounding

    4/8

    Afflalo is as good at cherry-picking rebounds as anyone. He rarely pulls one down when another player is challenging him—just about 11 percent of the time, in fact—but he's quite good at beating players to spots and ensuring that he's first in line to corral the board. 

    Intangibles

    9/10

    There are no complaints about the Orlando Magic swingman's demeanor on or off the court. Only his health comes into play here, as Afflalo's ankles were a bit balky throughout the latter portion of the 2013-14 campaign. 

    Overall

    77/100

    This is what the Magic needed from Afflalo. When the year began, he was viewed as a trade chip for this rebuilding squad, one who could easily be exchanged for draft picks or younger talent. But after asserting himself as a serious All-Star candidate, Afflalo forced general manager Rob Hennigan to start viewing him as a building block. 

56. Manu Ginobili, Shooting Guard, San Antonio Spurs

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    USA TODAY Sports

    Scoring

    22/25

    Manu Ginobili has never relied on athleticism to produce points, which means it shouldn't be even remotely surprising that he still fares well in this category at the ripe old age of 36. With his Eurostep, creative finishes and knack for figuring out openings in the defense, Ginobili is still scoring at a high rate while maintaining his efficient percentages. 

    Non-Scoring Offense

    16/20

    The Argentine shooting guard is still one of the best in the business at dishing out assists. Those left-handed passes are things of beauty, and he sees the game develop in ways that other less talented distributors can't even imagine. Oh, and he's quite good at making defenses nervous without the ball. 

    Defense

    27/40

    Age hasn't treated Ginobili so kindly in this department. He's never been the best defender at his position, but not even the vaunted system of the San Antonio Spurs can make up for his flaws at this stage of his career. Whether he's playing on or off the ball, he's been a bit of a liability. 

    Rebounding

    4/5

    Vision helps Ginobili here, as he sees the ball bouncing off the rim before the two objects actually collide. His numbers are slightly more impressive than they appear to be on the surface level, as he's a good rebounder in traffic and converts on many of his chances. 

    Intangibles

    8/10

    Ginobili is always a positive on-court influence, but only when he's actually on the court. Thanks to a strained left hamstring and the typical maintenance days Gregg Popovich gives to his veterans, that hasn't happened quite as frequently as we'd like. 

    Overall

    77/100

    So much for a decline. Ginobili's demise was discussed ad nauseam during last season's playoffs, but he derailed that train of thought with another vintage offensive season for the Spurs. His creativity on the court will never get old, even as he continues to age. 

55. Roy Hibbert, Center, Indiana Pacers

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    USA TODAY Sports

    Scoring

    13/20

    A 7'2" center should be better at scoring, but sometimes it seems like Roy Hibbert couldn't throw the ball in the basket if the rim were replaced with an oversized hula hoop made for Hagrid. He does tend to create a high percentage of the shots he makes for himself, but the inefficiency and lack of output is shocking for a man with so many physical blessings. 

    Non-Scoring Offense

    7/15

    Even though Hibbert shoots a low percentage, defenses can't just forget about him. He's big enough that he can just dunk if he's left alone, after all. On top of that, Hibbert is a willing screener whose big body makes it tough for defenders to get around him quickly. 

    Defense

    37/40

    Hibbert seemed like a Defensive Player of the Year lock early in the season, but his candidacy slipped when he was exposed during the second half of the campaign. He's as good as it gets guarding the rim—seriously, not one player in the NBA 200 received a higher rim-protection score—and his on-ball defense is superb. However, he gets in trouble when asked to stray away from the paint, as his lack of mobility is problematic. 

    Rebounding

    10/15

    While he does manage to come away with a respectable number of rebounds—respectable for a power forward who isn't elite on the glass—Hibbert's numbers look worse when compared to his aforementioned height. It's almost inconceivable that a player who towers over everyone on the court and spends much of his time right around the basket can routinely struggle to crack double digits. 

    Intangibles

    10/10

    Hibbert might gripe about his role in the offense, but he generally does so when the team is struggling. Most of his complaints are timed in a way that they're intended to get the Indiana Pacers off the schneid. So while I don't support his actions all the time, they're at least understandable and not worth losing points over. 

    Overall

    77/100

    It was a confusing season for the 27-year-old big man, who emerged as a serious award candidate early in the year while sparking a historically excellent Indiana defense. But as the year progressed, he regressed on both ends of the court, emerging as an overrated center who couldn't score, rebound or defend more versatile players. The average is—obviously—somewhere in between, but the truth likely lies closer to the early-season version of Hibbert. 

54. Andre Drummond, Center, Detroit Pistons

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    USA TODAY Sports

    Scoring

    16/20

    It's not easy to shoot above 60 percent from the field, but Andre Drummond did so for the second consecutive season. Except this time he upped his scoring output—both in terms of per-game and per-minute numbers—while creating a lot more offense for himself. The 20-year-old big man's reputation has him as a pick-and-roll finisher, but unless you tortured yourself watching the Detroit Pistons on a consistent basis, you might not have realized that he improved dramatically in the post. 

    Non-Scoring Offense

    7/15

    Drummond still can't pass to save his life, but defenses have to respect him when he moves toward the hoop and sets screens. An athletic player with massive ups and a soft pair of hands, Drummond is a constant threat to finish alley-oop plays so high above the rim that jaws hit the floor. 

    Defense

    29/40

    Although he has all the tools to be an NBA All-Defensive Team player, Drummond is a young big man still trying to figure things out. His rotations are weak, his anticipations sometimes come too soon and he generally plays an undisciplined brand of defense. Once his off-ball work catches up to what he can do in simple man-on-man situations, the world will be his oyster. 

    Rebounding

    15/15

    Drummond may have lost the rebounding crown to DeAndre Jordan, but he was the best player in the league on the boards in 2013-14. He barely missed out on the per-game title despite spending less time on the court, and a significantly higher percentage of his rebounds were of the contested variety. He's No. 1 in my book. 

    Intangibles

    10/10

    Gone is the indifference and lack of enthusiasm Drummond showed during his one collegiate season at Connecticut. The center may only be 20 years old, but he's already displaying leadership traits while remaining healthy. 

    Overall

    77/100

    There are quite a few teams who probably regret letting Drummond pass them by in the 2012 NBA draft. It was an understandable decision at the time, given the lack of improvement he showed at UConn, his indifference and the raw nature of his game, but it sure looks bad in hindsight. He's already developing into a top-tier center, one who will get even better with age. 

53. Al Horford, Center, Atlanta Hawks

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    USA TODAY Sports

    Scoring

    18/20

    Al Horford is quite adept at scoring from the blocks and the elbows, where his mid-range jumper is one of the more underrated options the NBA has to offer. Versatility is the name of the game for this particular Florida product, who excelled as the No. 1 scoring option for the Atlanta Hawks, although he did have to rely a bit too much on the passes of teammates to generate offense. 

    Non-Scoring Offense

    11/15

    The only thing holding Horfod back in this category was an aberration of a shortened season that saw his passing skills decline. He wasn't able to rack up assists as often, despite the ball-movement-heavy nature of the Atlanta offense, and he turned the ball over more than in the past, which negated some of the incredible work he did stretching out defenses with his jumper. 

    Defense

    30/40

    Horford is a solid defender who understands plays before they develop, which helps him anticipate action off the ball with time to spare. He's also a quality on-ball defender who can use his size to his advantage, but he struggles protecting the rim. Despite not being incredibly involved in the at-rim proceedings, Horford barely kept opponents below 50 percent. 

    Rebounding

    11/15

    A good rebounder, Horford doesn't put up enough monstrous games to be considered a great one. Though he only had 29 opportunities to rack up numbers in 2013-14, he topped out at 16 but only managed to get past 11 four times in those 29 attempts. On the flip side, he failed to record even seven boards on eight separate occasions. 

    Intangibles

    7/10

    It's all about health here, as Horford tore his pectoral muscle for the second time in three years. That's a strange injury, one that isn't exactly common among NBA players, but it's a painful blow that is the equivalent of a season-ending malady. 

    Overall

    77/100

    Had Horford remained healthy, the Hawks would've had a far more successful season. Sure, they snuck into the postseason with the No. 8 seed and a losing record, but this team was poised to claim the No. 3 seed before the center was injured. He's a dominant individual whose versatility helps everyone on the court. Well, everyone except the opposition. 

52. Isaiah Thomas, Point Guard, Sacramento Kings

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    USA TODAY Sports

    Scoring

    19/20

    Isaiah Thomas has become an absolute scoring stud. The diminutive point guard has been one of just a few 20-point scorers at the position, and he does so while A) shooting a solid percentage from the field, B) showcasing a decent stroke from downtown, C) getting to the free-throw line with remarkable frequency and D) hitting those freebies. Once his outside shooting catches up to his mid-range game, the sky is the limit. 

    Non-Scoring Offense

    16/25

    While he's a solid spot-up shooter, he's not especially threatening because the three-ball is the weakest aspect of his scoring game. Defenses can focus on other players when he isn't handling the rock. And as for Thomas' passing, it's likewise solid, but nothing special. 

    Defense

    30/40

    Evaluating Thomas' defense is tricky. While he's matador-like in his ability to usher offensive players into the paint, he's quite effective working off the ball. Thomas is an unrelenting bundle of energy who constantly forces the issue, whether he's closing out on shooters, bolting around screens or just pestering players without the ball. 

    Rebounding

    3/5

    What do you expect from the man who's tied with Nate Robinson as the shortest player in the NBA? Throughout the history of the Association, only a dozen players have ever been listed below Thomas' 5'9" frame. That's not an excuse for the point guard, though, as he still manages to pull down a respectable number of rebounds each outing. 

    Intangibles

    10/10

    A fiery competitor who can sometimes follow in DeMarcus Cousins' footsteps and get engaged in a bit of extracurricular activity, Thomas hasn't done anything meriting the loss of even a single point. He's used those competitive instincts for good. 

    Overall

    78/100

    How's this for an impressive turnaround? In the summer of 2011, Thomas was Mr. Irrelevant, drafted by the Sacramento Kings with the final pick of the proceedings. Less than three years later, he pops out as a top-15 point guard in the entire NBA. 

51. Jeff Teague, Point Guard, Atlanta Hawks

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    USA TODAY Sports

    Scoring

    17/20

    As soon as Al Horford went down, Jeff Teague's numbers began to decline. Without the added luxury of having another offensive hub in the lineup, his scoring was a bit exposed. That said, Teague has still posted stellar scoring numbers throughout the year, driven largely by his unrelenting confidence and ability to drive into the teeth of the defense. 

    Non-Scoring Offense

    17/25

    Teague is one of the biggest reasons that the Atlanta Hawks generate assists on what seems like nearly every made field goal. He controls the ball movement and has the ability to rack up gaudy dime totals on a nightly basis, which is made all the more impressive by the lackluster nature of his supporting cast and the injury woes that beset Atlanta throughout the year. If only his perimeter shooting actually made defenses feel threatened...

    Defense

    32/40

    If you put Teague into a one-on-one situation, he's going to struggle. But in a switch-heavy defensive scheme that allows him to spend plenty of time tracking non-ball-handlers around the court, he thrives. Few point guards have been better fighting through screens and closing out on spot-up shooters. 

    Rebounding

    3/5

    Teague doesn't spend much time around the basket, but he's quite adept at tracking down long rebounds. It's when he ventures in among the big boys that he's unable to make much of an impact on the glass, and contested rebounds aren't exactly his biggest strength. 

    Intangibles

    9/10

    By nature, point guards are supposed to be vocal leaders, but it's rare to see Teague in a role that asks other players to look toward him for direction. He's by no means a hindrance to the Hawks' efforts, and he has been getting more vocal, but it's just not quite enough for the perfect score. 

    Overall

    78/100

    Teague began the year in All-Star fashion, but he declined as the year went on. The responsibility of controlling the ball and directing offense took its toll, forcing his efficiency and the volume of his output to trend in the wrong direction. It's still unclear if Mike Budenholzer views him as a franchise centerpiece, but he could do far worse. 

50. Greg Monroe, Combo Big Man, Detroit Pistons

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    USA TODAY Sports

    Scoring

    16/20

    Greg Monroe struggled when Andre Drummond's presence pushed him outside the paint, but he was still a fantastic scorer when he was given space right around the basket. Though he's too reliant on his spin move, the man they call Moose has a devastating set of post maneuvers, allowing him to create his own offense and make a considerably high percentage of his shots. 

    Non-Scoring Offense

    7/15

    Although he's not much of a spot-up threat, Monroe spent his college days playing under John Thompson III at Georgetown, which means he's probably going to be a good passer. And he is, though he wasn't able to handle the ball and function as a distributor as often as he has in the past. 

    Defense

    31/40

    Monroe doesn't stand out defensively in any one area. He's neither great nor awful at off-ball defense, on-ball defense or when protecting the rim, although he was far better when the Pistons matched him up against opposing 5's. After all, posting up against Moose does usually tend to be a mistake. 

    Rebounding

    14/15

    Even though he's declined slightly both as an offensive and defensive rebounder, Monroe is still pretty darn good on the boards. He's a physical player after a missed shot, one who's in no way afraid to fight through contact and work his way to a contested rebound. 

    Intangibles

    10/10

    Even during a year filled with disappointing results, turmoil among the coaching staff and front office, players making poor decisions and another lottery pick, Monroe kept his mouth shut and went about his business. He just stayed healthy and quietly put together a season that flew well below the radar. 

    Overall

    78/100

    So long as he can play like a true center, he's going to function as an elite scorer and a solid defender, but the Pistons didn't always let him line up at the 5. Management is the reason Monroe's stock fell slightly during his fourth professional season, as he never truly settled in as a power forward. As a result, there should be major question marks about where this future restricted free agent will suit up next year. 

49. David Lee, Power Forward, Golden State Warriors

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    USA TODAY Sports

    Scoring

    18/20

    David Lee has always been a great scorer out of the frontcourt, and that narrative rang true once more during his latest season with the Golden State Warriors. A crafty player with excellent footwork and phenomenal touch, Lee isn't exactly easy to contain when he gets the ball in a one-on-one situation. 

    Non-Scoring Offense

    11/15

    That one-on-one ability makes it awfully difficult for defenses to throw double-teams at Stephen Curry or attempt to trap him. Schemes still have to prevent Lee from catching the ball on the elbow or one of the blocks, and they also have to make sure the power forward doesn't wreak havoc with his passing, limited as it may be this year. 

    Defense

    26/40

    Lee has been lambasted for his defensive efforts, and for good reason. He's a liability, one that must be hidden almost all the time, with the exception of one-on-one situations against less talented players. Sometimes he lucks into the right positioning, but Lee's sole defensive contributions come from his 6'9", 249-pound frame that can get in the way of a player trying to finish a close-range attempt. 

    Rebounding

    14/15

    Few players are better at using their bodies to hold position after a missed shot. Lee might not be able to sky over other rebound-seeking hands, but he always seems to come down with the boards. This was his worst rebounding season in years, and he was still one of the best out there. 

    Intangibles

    9/10

    Lee hasn't been able to stay healthy over the last few years, and at some point a series of fluke injuries needs to be considered something more than bad luck. Did we reach the tipping point when nerve inflammation in his right hamstring took him out of the Dubs lineup down the stretch? 

    Overall

    78/100

    If you're looking for a speciality star, Lee would qualify. He's a fantastic offensive commodity who excels on the boards, but he's absolutely awful when asked to play defense. Lee wouldn't thrive on just any team, because he needs to be played situationally while surrounded by the right teammates, ones who can cover up for his weaknesses. 

48. Gordon Hayward, Swingman, Utah Jazz

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    USA TODAY Sports

    Scoring

    16/22

    Gordon Hayward has been able to score in volume as the go-to option for the Utah Jazz, but he'd likely look even better if he were joined by a few more scoring standouts (or even one, for that matter). His efficiency has dipped because defenses keyed in on him so frequently, but he still maintained respectable percentages. 

    Non-Scoring Offense

    15/20

    Even though Hayward is a respectable off-ball threat, it's facilitating that earns him the bulk of his points in this category. While he was a solid distributor during his first three seasons in Salt Lake City, he made a monumental leap this year, racking up many more assists (and a much higher assist percentage) without turning the ball over too often. 

    Defense

    30/40

    On-ball defense can be a struggle for Hayward at times, although his responsibilities on the other end are partly to blame for draining much of his energy. It's during off-ball defense situations where he makes up for those deficits, as his long arms and exceptional athleticism help him disrupt many plays. Chase-down blocks, anyone?

    Rebounding

    7/8

    You can never accuse Hayward of exerting lackluster effort on the glass. He constantly seeks out rebounds and understands that his job requires him to make a significant impact in this area, something he does far more often than not. 

    Intangibles

    10/10

    Hayward has embraced a true leadership role for the Utah Jazz, and he spurs his troops by example. He's a hard worker who carries himself with professionalism, and it obviously helps that he's proved to be quite durable. 

    Overall

    78/100

    Without Paul Millsap and Al Jefferson in the Utah lineup, Hayward became the de facto No. 1 player. Although there were aspects of the role that he struggled with—primarily the ability to score efficiently while drawing the lion's share of defensive attention—he still had what can only be considered a breakout season for the Jazz. 

47. Jrue Holiday, Point Guard, New Orleans Pelicans

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    USA TODAY Sports

    Scoring

    15/20

    Part of what made Jrue Holiday so special during his final season with the Philadelphia 76ers was his willingness to attack the basket with reckless abandon. But before he got injured, the New Orleans Pelicans floor general was hesitant to put his head down, instead relying on an inefficient mid-range game that didn't allow him to thrive as a scorer. 

    Non-Scoring Offense

    19/25

    Holiday isn't exactly a terrifying off-ball threat, and defenses can often forget about him when he gives up possession of the ball. But that doesn't happen too often, seeing as the point guard is an incredible passer. He's continued to get better and better during his NBA career, and the healthy portion of the 2013-14 campaign was his distributing piece de resistance. 

    Defense

    32/40

    Holiday does a great job remaining in his defensive stance and making only smart gambles. If he were a blackjack player, he'd be one of those guys who refused to hit on anything more than a 12, which does sometimes inhibit his ability to make off-ball plays and jump the passing lanes. However, he does have a few notable weaknesses—navigating pick-and-roll sets and locating spot-up shooters quickly enough to contest those jumpers. 

    Rebounding

    5/5

    Not only does Holiday do a better job grabbing contested rebounds than most point guards, but he also grabs boards with remarkable volume. Though he's not quite on the level of a Michael Carter-Williams or Russell Westbrook, he's one of the few floor generals capable of routinely challenging upper single digits. 

    Intangibles

    7/10

    Durability is a tough category for Holiday, who played in only 34 games before succumbing to a stress fracture in his right tibia and the subsequent surgery that knocked him out for the rest of the 2013-14 season. It's the first year of his career that Holiday has experienced a major injury, but it's significant nonetheless. 

    Overall

    78/100

    Expect Holiday—a first-time All-Star during the 2012-13 campaign—to rebound with a strong season next year, especially now that he's surrounded with talent by the bayou. But this go-round was a rough one, largely because of that unfortunate season-ending injury. A perfect durability score, after all, would've earned the UCLA product a top-10 spot. 

46. Klay Thompson, Shooting Guard, Golden State Warriors

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    Scoring

    18/25

    Only four different players in NBA history have ever hit at least 200 three-pointers in one of their first three professional seasons: Aaron Brooks, Kyle Korver, Damian Lillard and Klay Thompson. But thanks to his 2013-14 season, which continued to see him excel from beyond the arc, Thompson is now the only man to do so twice. 

    Non-Scoring Offense

    13/20

    Failing to respect Thompson's shot is a big mistake, one that defenses are quite hesitant to make. He is half of the Splash Brothers' backcourt pairing, after all. Unfortunately, though, the Washington State product's passing isn't nearly on the same level as his spot-up shooting. 

    Defense

    34/40

    Thompson has quickly become a two-way stud, as his perimeter defense was one of the many reasons Mark Jackson's squad ended up with one of the top point-preventing units in the Association. He thrived both on and off the ball, and the only gripe is that he sometimes spends time conserving energy rather than trying to jump lanes and recover to his man. 

    Rebounding

    3/5

    It's pretty understandable that Thompson doesn't rack up the rebounds, but that's not going to boost his score. Keeping him inside the arc on offense is nonsensical, and he often takes on the tougher perimeter assignments while playing defense. 

    Intangibles

    10/10

    Thompson rarely finds himself in the news for anything other than stellar play, and he's stayed quite healthy throughout his NBA career. 2013-14 was no exception. 

    Overall

    78/100

    The third-year pro is coming into his own for the Golden State Warriors. Though the focus still deservedly remains on his perimeter shooting, he's improved his all-around game and continues to thrive as an underrated defender. The Dubs have to be excited about his future. 

45. DeAndre Jordan, Center, Los Angeles Clippers

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    USA TODAY Sports

    Scoring

    13/20

    Does DeAndre Jordan score a lot for the Los Angeles Clippers? Not at all. Does he ever create his own offense? Nope, not really. Is he efficient? It's hard to argue he isn't, seeing as he led all qualified players in field-goal percentage and effective field-goal percentage during the 2013-14 season. 

    Non-Scoring Offense

    5/15

    An awful passer, Jordan still holds some value on the offensive end because he can set solid screens and is a constant threat to finish the play with a thunderous alley-oop slam. If you don't believe me, you're more than welcome to ask Brandon Knight what he thinks

    Defense

    35/40

    Doc Rivers sure did a nice job turning the uber-athletic big man into a legitimate Defensive Player of the Year candidate, and it only took one season. Though he can still be beaten out on the perimeter by more versatile centers who are capable of handling the ball, he did an excellent job playing help defense and protecting the rim at all times. Few players were more defensively involved than Jordan. 

    Rebounding

    15/15

    Did you actually expect the league leader in rebounds per game to receive anything less than a perfect score in this category? 

    Intangibles

    10/10

    Jordan's body must be made of something other than typical human material. The 6'11" center puts even more stress on his joints than most big men because of his high-flying habits but still hasn't missed even a single game over the past three seasons. 

    Overall

    78/100

    One of the most improved players throughout the NBA, Jordan became so much more than a shot-blocking alley-oop finisher during the 2013-14 season. His offensive game remained quite limited, though it was certainly efficient, but his rebounding productivity skyrocketed while he became a much smarter defender capable of making an impact without swatting a shot. 

44. Kawhi Leonard, Small Forward, San Antonio Spurs

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    Scoring

    15/20

    The San Antonio Spurs' ball-sharing system prevents any one player from standing out as a scorer, but Kawhi Leonard has done his darnedest to excel nonetheless. By coupling his stellar three-point shooting with a penchant for finishing at the rim, Leonard was extremely efficient. Then he added in an excellent mid-range game, which basically maximized his level of production as a non-featured option. 

    Non-Scoring Offense

    7/20

    If there's any area in which Leonard needs to improve, it's this one. He's not a player who inspires sheer terror when moving without the ball, and his passing is lackluster at best. Rarely do you see Leonard make even one pass that the average small forward couldn't have successfully completed. 

    Defense

    37/40

    Leonard entered the league as a bit of a defensive specialist back in 2011, and he's maintained that point-preventing prowess despite gaining abilities in other areas. Few players in the league are better at locking down a wing player throughout an entire game, and his effectiveness is by no means limited to man-on-man situations. 

    Rebounding

    10/10

    It's tough to find a small forward who rebounds in traffic so well that over 30 percent of his successful ventures on the glass come with another player in his vicinity. But I'll give you a hint so you don't end up trying to find one for too long: Leonard qualifies. 

    Intangibles

    9/10

    Does the 22-year-old talk enough to generate bad publicity? He just quietly goes about his business for the most part, though he's not escaping with a 10-of-10 score this year. Injuries did get to the San Diego State product, as he missed 14 games in the middle of the season with a fracture of his fourth metacarpal.

    Overall

    78/100

    The Spurs just aren't fair. Eventually, Tim Duncan is going to retire (I think...), and Leonard will step into the superstar role, leaving the model franchise maintaining its spot among the NBA elite. The small forward is only missing opportunity to thrive as a scorer, because he's already showing out in nearly every facet of the game. 

43. Andre Iguodala, Small Forward, Golden State Warriors

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    USA TODAY Sports

    Scoring

    11/20

    It's almost inconceivable that Andre Iguodala's offense dropped off this quickly. He actually elevated his percentages, but a serious dip in usage prevented him from ever gaining much rhythm in the Golden State Warriors' system. Iggy was forced to be a last resort on the offensive end, and it was rather difficult for him to score in double digits on most nights. 

    Non-Scoring Offense

    14/20

    Iguodala has remained an elite facilitator for his position, even if he doesn't have the ball in his hands enough to rack up eye-popping assist totals. Let's put it this way: Iggy is so strong as a distributor that the Dubs have actually felt comfortable letting him run the point when the other top-notch options are either injured or need a quick rest. 

    Defense

    37/40

    Wing players aren't typically going to garner Defensive Player of the Year consideration, but Iguodala deserves a bit for the stellar work he's done on the less glamorous end of the court. Golden State is a struggling defensive team when Iggy is on the bench; when he plays, the team's defensive rating is right up there in contention for the No. 1 spot throughout the Association. 

    Rebounding

    7/10

    Iguodala isn't particularly active on the glass, partially because he's a transition threat who can either finish the coast-to-coast play or lead a multi-player drive, but he does an excellent job capitalizing on his opportunities. His work on the offensive glass has been on par with the rest of his career, even if he's struggled a bit more than usual on the other end. 

    Intangibles

    9/10

    You'll rarely hear about Iguodala complaining, unless a bobblehead is involved. Only injuries affect him negatively here, as a sore hamstring at the start of the season forced Golden State to work from behind the eight ball right off the bat. 

    Overall

    78/100

    Consider Iguodala one of the non-stats All-Stars. His box scores aren't always pretty, but he impacts so many areas of the game that aren't going to show up as either points, rebounds, assists, steals or blocks. He did experience a slight offensive decline, but his defense keeps his value right up there. 

42. Serge Ibaka, Power Forward, Oklahoma City Thunder

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    Scoring

    14/20

    It's time that we stop expecting Serge Ibaka to develop into anything more than a good, but not great, scorer. Even though Russell Westbrook's prolonged absence gave him a chance to emerge as a terrific complementary option, Ibaka only slightly increased his output while coupling that with a corresponding decrease in efficiency. 

    Non-Scoring Offense

    7/15

    Ibaka isn't a true stretch 4, but he's one of the more dangerous pick-and-pop threats in the Association, which always makes defenses think just a bit more. If only he could couple that with some advanced passing skills, as he's most certainly not one of the better playmakers on the Oklahoma City Thunder. 

    Defense

    33/40

    In terms of rim protection, Ibaka is fantastic. He rejects a lot of shots and does a tremendous job altering quite a few more. However, he's still learning how to rotate properly, and he can often be caught out of position or forced into biting for a fake, leaving him susceptible to a quick counter move. 

    Rebounding

    14/15

    For whatever reason, Ibaka doesn't get noticed for his rebounding. It's easier to focus on his jumper and shot-blocking prowess. Nonetheless, the Congolese power forward produces exceptional rebounding totals night in and night out, a statement that applies to both ends of the court. 

    Intangibles

    10/10

    A rather understated player who leaves his passion on the court, Ibaka rarely generates headlines, much less negative ones. He hasn't created any distractions for OKC, and he's stayed quite healthy throughout the 2013-14 season. 

    Overall

    78/100

    Ibaka still hasn't developed into a superstar, even though Westbrook's knees have given him chances to do so, but he's an extremely solid player on both ends of the court. The power forward knows his role, and he excels in it while making marginal improvements each and every year. 2013-14 was no exception. 

41. Marc Gasol, Center, Memphis Grizzlies

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    Rocky Widner/Getty Images

    Scoring

    16/20

    Marc Gasol doesn't stand out in any one way as a scorer. He doesn't dazzle in the post, his mid-range game doesn't leave him among the elite group of big men and he's not athletic enough to finish plays above the rim on a regular basis. However, the versatility and combined impact from all facets of his scoring game makes for an impressive overall product. 

    Non-Scoring Offense

    12/15

    Sometimes Gasol looks like a point guard trapped in a 7-footer's body. The passes he makes are just ridiculous, ones that almost no other frontcourt player in the league would think to attempt. Whether he's getting caught in the air and whipping the ball to a corner, dishing out behind-the-back dimes to backdoor cutters or leading a man on a charge down the lane with a perfectly timed bounce pass, he's remarkably entertaining as a distributor. 

    Defense

    34/40

    Even though Gasol received top marks for on-ball defense, excelled as an off-ball defender and was adequate protecting the rim, he's normally more effective. David Joerger's system eliminated the Memphis Grizzlies' instinctive understanding of positioning and rotations at the beginning of the year, which was the foundation of Gasol's excellence. Then he had to recover from an MCL injury. The 2012-13 Defensive Player of the Year is better than this grade—which has to be based solely on the 2013-14 season—would indicate. 

    Rebounding

    8/15

    Here's Gasol's biggest weakness. Despite his size, the Spanish big man elects to pursue mostly rebounds he knows he can grab, showing relative indifference to 50/50 balls and boards that might require an inordinate amount of contact. 

    Intangibles

    8/10

    Only durability works against Gasol here, as the MCL sprain kept him out for a significant portion of the 2013-14 season. The Memphis big man does all the little things well and is more than content playing winning basketball at the expense of individual statistics. 

    Overall

    78/100

    Unfortunately for Gasol, the 2013-14 season didn't treat him too kindly. Adjustments to Joerger's system made for a rough opening salvo, and an MCL sprain derailed his campaign right after that. But he rebounded nevertheless, reasserting himself as a truly elite center. Had he stayed healthy, it's easy to think he would've ranked significantly higher in the final rankings. 

40. Deron Williams, Point Guard, Brooklyn Nets

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    USA TODAY Sports

    Scoring

    16/20

    Gone are the Utah Jazz days when Deron Williams could routinely challenge the 20-point barrier while making over half of his shots from the field. In their place lies the Brooklyn Nets version of D-Will, one who can still light up the scoreboard but relies far more heavily on his outside shooting than his devastating crossover. 

    Non-Scoring Offense

    19/25

    Finding a point guard more dangerous without the ball in his hands is the equivalent of finding a needle in a haystack; it exists, but it's pretty darn elusive. Then again, the assists have been becoming increasingly elusive as well for Williams, who is finding it difficult to maintain his grasp on elite status. 

    Defense

    35/40

    D-Will's defensive skills don't often get focused on, but he's left no doubt during the 2013-14 season that he's an above-average stopper in most aspects. Not only are the Nets significantly better at preventing points when he plays, but his off-ball defense got better and better as the season wore on.

    Rebounding

    2/5

    You'd think such a big floor general would make more of an impact on the glass. Sadly for Brooklyn, Williams has never shown off much desire to help out on the boards, and he's content just grabbing up loose balls when no one else gets there first. 

    Intangibles

    7/10

    Williams' reputation as a coach killer hasn't irritated his relationship with Jason Kidd, but there are times when he seems rather testy on the court. The bigger problem, though, is his health. Ankle problems severely inhibited him throughout the season, and it's not like this is anything new. 

    Overall

    79/100

    The 29-year-old is clearly entering the declining phase of his career a bit early, but a fantastic second half has allowed hope to enter back into the equation. The 6'3" point guard has been an offensive and defensive spark plug for the Nets, even if wear and tear are keeping him from looking truly elite. 

39. David West, Power Forward, Indiana Pacers

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    USA TODAY Sports

    Scoring

    13/20

    If you watch enough Indiana Pacers games, you start to get the sense that David West doesn't really care about scoring. He does it because the team needs him to put up efficient points, but that's by no means his priority when he's out on the hardwood. And even still, West is able to catch everyone by surprise with a few crucially timed mid-range jumpers. 

    Non-Scoring Offense

    9/15

    Few players set better screens than West. He's a physical behemoth, and he's going to deliver at least one bone-crunching pick each game that frees a ball-handler for so long he could take a quick nap before driving or pulling up. Though West's off-ball scoring isn't enough for him to crack double-digits in this category, he's a consummate professional who does all the little things on offense. 

    Defense

    35/40

    Whether he's getting into his defensive stance and moving sideways to stay in front of a smaller player or bodying up and taking the brunt of a post-up situation, to the extent that his chest is probably bruised after a game from the constant shouldering, West is a defensive asset. Age has sapped some of his athleticism and quickness, but his only true weakness comes when he's left alone in the paint and asked to protect the rim. 

    Rebounding

    12/15

    West is a solid rebounder. Nothing less, and nothing more. He doesn't go out of his way to make an impact on the boards, but he's a physical player who can work through contact quite nicely. 

    Intangibles

    10/10

    A leader through and through, this particular power forward has a no-nonsense attitude both on and off the court. He demands excellence from himself, and it's easy to get the feeling that the rest of his teammates are scared to give anything less than their best. 

    Overall

    79/100

    West doesn't care about statistics; he just concerns himself with wins. And that shows in his play, as he's one of the most likely players in the Association to remain perfectly content while doing all the little things on both ends of the court. Even if he's not the best player on the Pacers, he's the heart and soul of that team. 

38. Lance Stephenson, Shooting Guard, Indiana Pacers

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    USA TODAY Sports

    Scoring

    19/25

    Lance Stephenson's outside shot just keeps trending in the right direction, and the rest of his offensive game is following suit. The 2-guard has an attacking mentality—though that's sometimes detrimental—and he can score at a high level both in transition and the half-court set. 

    Non-Scoring Offense

    12/20

    Not only did Born Ready improve to become a mediocre spot-up shooter, but he remains an effective, aggressive and violent cutter who forces defenses to pay attention to him at all times. On top of that, his distributing skills appeared to be much better throughout the 2013-14 season, even if he occasionally had trouble maintaining possession of the rock. 

    Defense

    34/40

    Stephenson's individual numbers aren't excellent, but that's not entirely problematic. He takes on tough assignments, and he also acts like a whirling dervish on the court, playing relentlessly difficult defense regardless of who has the ball. He understands that team defense can be just as impactful as individual work.

    Rebounding

    5/5

    He can occasionally be a selfish rebounder, stealing chances away from his teammates to pad his stats, but the Indiana Pacers have to love his aggressive mentality on the glass. Stephenson legitimately thinks he's going to get every rebound possible, and the result was arguably the greatest season on the boards by a guard since the turn of the century. 

    Intangibles

    9/10

    Stephenson's antics can get a bit annoying. He has a penchant for showmanship, but it's not always a positive for the Pacers. His passion can get a bit too passionate, and his aggressiveness can get a bit too aggressive. 

    Overall

    79/100

    Stephenson was a breakout star for the Pacers, showcasing his two-way skills throughout the entire season. His ball-handling abilities—both in terms of creating shots for himself and for others—gave the offense a new dynamic, and his defensive mentality fit right in with the overall scheme. 

37. Chandler Parsons, Small Forward, Houston Rockets

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    USA TODAY Sports

    Scoring

    16/20

    If you're seeking out a beautiful shooting chart, just go check out Chandler Parsons. He can knock down three-point attempts above and below the break, and he makes getting to the rim a priority. Rarely does Parsons settle for a mid-range look, because he's well aware it's the least efficient area of the court. 

    Non-Scoring Offense

    13/20

    Parsons has made strides as a distributor each and every year of his professional career, and this season was no exception. Not only did he cut back on his turnover percentage—particularly by keeping his dribbling tighter—but his assist percentage rose yet again. The Houston Rockets seem increasingly comfortable when Parsons runs the show.  

    Defense

    33/40

    Already a borderline-elite on-ball defender, Parsons needs to become a bit more disciplined when he's attempting to corral scorers who are dangerous when they don't have possession of the ball. His length does allow him to close out on spot-up shooters, but he's not always in the right position when a lot of motion is involved. 

    Rebounding

    7/10

    It's hard to stand out when surrounded by players who also excel in this category, but Parsons still manages to post excellent numbers as a rebounder. Whether there's another player fighting with him for control of a missed shot, the former Florida Gator tends to do a good job pulling in the ball. 

    Intangibles

    10/10

    A sore knee in January and back spasms in December kept Parsons out of a few games, but he was still quite durable from start to finish. In fact, the only part of him that didn't really make it through the season was his hair, as he chopped it off to pay homage to a 10-year-old with cancer.   

    Overall

    79/100

    When Parsons left Florida and was the No. 38 pick in the 2011 NBA draft, he was average at everything and great at nothing. Three seasons later, he's become great at quite a few things and above average at just about everything else. He's a prototypical Swiss army knife who should make Houston feel like it does actually have a third member of a Big Three. 

36. Pau Gasol, Combo Big Man, Los Angeles Lakers

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    USA TODAY Sports

    Scoring

    16/20

    Pau Gasol got off to a shockingly slow start during the 2013-14 campaign, but he rebounded his way to success by the end of the year. Even if the Los Angeles Lakers couldn't take advantage of his scoring, the big man still managed to post numbers that made his 2012-13 season pale in comparison. The post moves, mid-range jumpers and dives to the basket all suited him well after the shaky start. 

    Non-Scoring Offense

    11/15

    Although Gasol's range doesn't extend as far as that of some other power forwards, combo big men and centers, he's able to spread out the court and keep defenses honest whenever his shot is falling. It also helps that he's a savvy passer, one who can create offense for his teammates from the elbows and force the Lake Show to run things through him at times. 

    Defense

    29/40

    The Spanish 7-footer is capable of slowing down a man when faced with a simple on-ball matchup. But anything more complicated than that is likely to lead to a bewildered/disappointed/saddened expression on Gasol's face after he gives up an easy look at the rim. This big man may be bilingual, but he still doesn't have "help defense" in his vocabulary. 

    Rebounding

    14/15

    Though Gasol doesn't add all that much on the offensive glass, he's remained a dominant defensive rebounder as Father Time continues to affect his career. Few players throughout the NBA posted a better defensive rebounding percentage than this grizzled veteran.

    Intangibles

    9/10

    It would've been easy for Gasol to lose his temper given the constant trade rumors and the utter futility of the Purple and Gold. Nevertheless, he maintained his professionalism and worked to get off the schneid early in the year, though a toe injury, strained groin and vertigo all kept him out of the lineup later on. 

    Overall

    79/100

    Let's not be so quick to dismiss Gasol as a washed-up veteran. Though he was injured at the end of the season, played for a pretty terrible Lakers squad, staunchly refused to play off-ball defense and was always mentioned in trade rumors, he still made valuable contributions when he was on the court. His rebounding was excellent, and it's hard to argue with the offense he puts up when healthy. 

35. Monta Ellis, Shooting Guard, Dallas Mavericks

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    USA TODAY Sports

    Scoring

    22/25

    An overrated volume scorer with the Milwaukee Bucks—and, to a lesser extent, at times during his career with the Golden State Warriors—Monta Ellis thrived in his new digs. No longer reliant on an ineffective three-point stroke, Ellis attacked the basket relentlessly and finally paired some efficiency with his high-scoring nature. 

    Non-Scoring Offense

    14/20

    Ellis isn't much of an off-ball threat unless he's cutting to the hoop, but he's a premier facilitator among the backdrop of 2-guards in the Association. Though he turns the ball over a bit too often—primarily through bad passes and careless dribbling—he still racks up assists as well as nearly anyone at the position. It only took him 20 games with the Dallas Mavericks to hit double digits three times. 

    Defense

    30/40

    Steals aren't the equivalent of good defense, and Ellis is the poster boy for that movement, even if he probably doesn't want to be. While the shooting guard does have quick hands, he gambles far too often, and the positivity of the thefts is mitigated by the number of times he's ridiculously far out of position. 

    Rebounding

    3/5

    You can't fault Ellis for a lack of effort on the boards. He rockets around the court like it's his job to collect every rebound that eludes the big men, which often puts him in the vicinity of a missed shot. That said, he's often late to the punch. 

    Intangibles

    10/10

    Though his style of play may rub some the wrong way, Ellis certainly endears himself to his teammates with his passionate efforts and unrelenting confidence. He was also remarkably durable during his first season under Mark Cuban's supervision. 

    Overall

    79/100

    A change of location can have a marvelously positive impact on a player's career. Ellis seemed to take past criticism to heart throughout the 2013-14 season, eschewing those ill-advised triples and focusing instead on his impressive driving ability at all times. 

34. Kemba Walker, Point Guard, Charlotte Bobcats

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    USA TODAY Sports

    Scoring

    17/20

    Is Kemba Walker an efficient shooter? Nope, not really. But he does manage to add value from beyond the arc and spends quite a bit of time knocking down freebies at the charit