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Detroit Pistons: The 5 Baddest Boys of the Bad Boys Era

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Detroit Pistons: The 5 Baddest Boys of the Bad Boys Era
AP PHOTO

If you weren’t a Detroit Pistons fan in the late '80s and early '90s then you undoubtedly hated the “Motor City Bad Boys.”

And that’s how we like it.

Led by a physically aggressive, defense-orientated core of players, the Detroit Pistons literally fought their way to back-to-back NBA championships in ’89 and ’90.

And when it came to defending the “Bad Boys” moniker, no player was safe.

Not Barkley, not Bird and especially not Michael Jordan.

Detroit’s initial inability to successfully defend “His Airness” led to Pistons head coach Chuck Daly instituting the “Jordan Rules.”

Daly vowed that Jordan himself would never defeat the Pistons again.

Essentially the “Jordan Rules” indicated that No. 23 was to be stopped by any means necessary.

Ultimately, it was this mentality to win by any means necessary that allowed the Detroit Pistons to steamroll opponents.

The 1988-89 and 1989-90 Detroit Pistons teams are considered by most to be some of the greatest in NBA history. The ‘88-'89 Pistons dominated the regular season, finishing with a 63-19 record.

The “Bad Boys” were largely responsible for the demise of the great Lakers and Celtics teams of the '80s.

The Pistons defeated the Los Angeles Lakers for the organization's first championship in 1989. Prior to the ’89 championship, the Lakers and Celtics combined for eight total NBA championships from 1980-1988.

Neither the Los Angeles Lakers nor the Boston Celtics would win an NBA championship again until Shaq and Kobe combined to win the Lakers a championship in 2000.

The world hated the "Bad Boys" and here are five reasons why.

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