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Boston Celtics: The 50 Greatest Players in Franchise History

Kevin KraczkowskiCorrespondent IIIJanuary 8, 2017

Boston Celtics: The 50 Greatest Players in Franchise History

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    The Boston Celtics have won 17 NBA Championships, more than any other team.  This includes 11-of-13 from 1957-1969 and eight in a row starting in 1958, a North American record for consecutive professional championships.

    The Celtics have posted a winning record in 48 of 62 seasons.  They had 27 non losing win/loss records in succession from 1950-1976. 

    Traditionally, the Celtics have always had a big three.

    In the 1960s: Cousy, Jones, and Russell.

    In the 1970s: Cowens, Havlicek, and White.

    In the 1980s: Bird, McHale, and Parrish.

    Starting in 1993, Boston posted losing records in eight consecutive seasons, putting them in an unfamiliar position—a team without a chance.

    In recent years, the rise of a new big three has brought hope back to Beantown, with Paul Pierce, Kevin Garnett, and Ray Allen.

    This list recognizes the top 50 players in Celtics history.  I based the list on the "Win Share" statistic available through http://www.basketball-reference.com/.

    I only counted statistics for players while with the team (regular season and playoffs).

50. Steve Kuberski (1969-1974, 1975-1977, WS: 12.1)

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    Kuberski joined the Celtics in 1969 as a fourth-round draft choice.  He played college ball at Bradley University.

    Kuberski was mostly a role player for the Celtics, coming off the bench at forward and center.  His best offensive season was 1970-71, when he played in all 82 games and averaged a career high 22.8 minutes per game.  He averaged nine points and seven rebounds for that season.

    Kuberski was selected by the New Orleans Jazz in the expansion draft in 1974, and would later be traded to the Milwaukee Bucks before ultimately returning to the Celtics as a free agent near the end of 1975.

    Kuberski totalled 499 games over eight seasons with the Celtics, averaging six points and four rebounds in 15 minutes per game.

    He was the last player to wear No. 33 before Larry Bird came along.

49. Raef LaFrentz (2003-2006, WS: 13.2)

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    LaFrentz played college basketball for the University of Kansas, where he was an AP All-American first team selection in 1996-97 and 1997-98.  The Denver Nuggets drafted him with the third pick of the 1998 NBA draft.  He was traded to the Dallas Mavericks in 2002, then to the Celtics in 2003.

    LaFrentz started at forward and at center for Boston.  His best season with the club was 2004-05, when he started in 80 games, averaging 11 points, seven rebounds and 1.2 steals per game.

    He played in a total of 179 games for the Celtics. He averaged 25.5 minutes per game, scoring nine points with six rebounds and one block per game.

    He would join the Portland Trail Blazers for the 2006 season.

48. Tony Allen (2004-2010, WS: 13.5)

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    Allen played for the Oklahoma State Cowboys in college.  The Celtics drafted him in the first round of the 2004 NBA draft.

    The Celtics used him as a shooting guard off the bench.  His breakout season with the Celtics was shaping up to be 2006-07.  He was averaging 24 minutes and 12 points, four rebounds and 1.5 steals per game.  33 games into the season he suffered a debilitating knee injury after a dunk attempt, finishing his season.

    He signed as a free agent with the Memphis Grizzlies prior to the 2010-11 season, closing the book on his Celtic career. 

    He played a total of 336 games with the club, playing 18.4 minutes per game with 7.2 points, 2.6 boards, and over one steal per game.

47. Mark Blount (2000-2002, 2003-2006, WS: 14.0)

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    Blount was a Pittsburgh Panther in college.  After not being drafted, he took his services to the minor leagues and abroad.  After three years in the CBA, the USBL, the IBL and France, he was signed by the Celtics as a free agent in 2000.

    During his first two seasons with the club, he averaged about 14 minutes per night off the bench to play center.  He signed a free agent contract with the Denver Nuggets during the 2002 offseason.  Midway through the year, he was traded back to Boston.  He had a much more prominent role during his second stint with the team.

    As a second time Celtic, Blount became their starting center.  He played in all 82 games in 2003-04, and was second in the league with a .566 shooting percentage.  He again played every game in 2004-05, shooting .529, good for seventh in the NBA.

    Blount would later play for the Minnesota Timberwolves and the Miami Heat.  He finished out his Celtic career having played parts of six seasons for the club, totalling 338 games.  He averaged 23 minutes, eight points, five boards, and one block per game.

46. Rick Robey (1979-1983, AV: 14.5)

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    Robey was a member of the University of Kentucky Wildcats as a collegian.  The Indiana Pacers drafted him with their first round pick in the 1978 NBA draft.  He came to the Celtics in 1979 via trade.

    Robey was the first big man off the bench for the Celtics during his run with the team, playing center and forward.  He played every game in 1979-80 and 1980-81.

    1979-80 was his best year with the Celtics, he averaged 24 minutes, 12 points and seven rebounds per game.

    He was traded to the Phoenix Suns in 1983.  He totalled 339 games over five seasons with Boston, averaging 19 minutes, eight points and five rebounds per game.

45. Dino Radja (1993-1997, WS: 14.5)

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    Radja was a Croatian professional basketball player when he was drafted by Boston in the 1989 draft.  He would join the Celtics in 1993.

    He would win All-Rookie second team honors in 1993-94, averaging 15 points and seven boards per game.

    Radja would remain with the Celtics until 1997, when he was traded to the Philadelphia 76ers.  He subsequently failed his physical, prompting him to return to Europe. 

    He played 3-and-a-half seasons with Boston, playing in 224 games as a forward and center.  He averaged 33 minutes, 17 points, eight rebounds and 1.3 blocks per game.

44. Walter McCarty (1997-2005, WS: 14.9)

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    The New York Knicks drafted McCarty with their first-round pick of the 1996 draft. McCarty was out of the University of Kentucky.  The Celtics acquired him with a trade in 1997.

    McCarty's first year with Boston was his best.  He played in every game and earned career highs in nearly every offensive category.  He averaged 29 minutes, 10 points and four rebounds per game in that season.

    McCarty was traded to the Phoenix Suns in 2005 and later played for the Los Angeles Clippers

    He played in 494 games over eight seasons with the Celtics, averaging 19 minutes, six points, and three rebounds per game.

43. David Wesley (1994-1997, WS: 15.0)

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    Wesley played college ball with the Baylor Bears.  The point guard signed as an undrafted free agent with the New Jersey Nets in 1993.  He joined the Celtics in the 1994 offseason.

    In 1995-96 Wesley appeared in every game.  In 1996-97, he would average 40.4 minutes per game and collected 162 steals, both good for seventh best in the league.

    He would go on to play for the Charlotte/New Orleans Hornets, the Houston Rockets and the Cleveland Cavaliers

    Wesley played 207 games over three seasons with Boston, averaging 31 minutes, 13 points, six assists and 1.7 steals per game.

42. Glen Davis (2007-Present, WS: 15.6)

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    Davis, or "Big Baby," plays Forward for the Celtics.  He was drafted out of LSU in the second round of the 2007 NBA draft by the Seattle Supersonics; he was then traded to Boston on the same day.

    The 2010-11 season saw him take on a bigger role, seeing career highs in minutes with 30 per game.  He also recognized career highs with 12 points and five rebounds per game.

    He has averaged 21 minutes per game in 277 games, scoring eight points and four rebounds per game.

41. Gerald Henderson (1979-1984, AV: 16.9)

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    Henderson attended Virginia Commonwealth University.  He was drafted in the third round of the 1978 NBA draft by the San Antonio Spurs, but failed to make the final cut.  He would make his NBA debut a year later after signing a free agent contract with Boston.

    For five seasons, he played mostly off the bench as the backup shooting guard.  He seldom missed a game, playing in all 82 games for three consecutive seasons for Boston.

    His best year with the Celtics was 1983-84, when he averaged 12 points, four assists, and 1.5 steals in 27 minutes per game.

    Henderson played 400 games over five seasons, averaging 20 minutes, nine points, three assists and one steal per game.

    He would go on to play for the Seattle Supersonics, New York Knicks, Philadelphia 76ers, Milwaukee Bucks, Detroit Pistons and Houston Rockets.

40. Chris Ford (1978-1982, AV: 16.9)

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    After playing college ball at Villanova, Ford was selected in the second round of the 1972 draft by the Detroit Pistons.  He played for Detroit for six seasons before being traded to the Celtics in 1978.

    Ford made the first three point shot in NBA history on 10/12/79 against the Houston Rockets.  He would post a .427 three point percentage that season, good for second in the NBA. 

    Ford would play four seasons with Boston, averaging 29.3 minutes, 10.3 points, 3.3 assists, and a .375 3-point percentage.

    He would come back as an assistant, then later a head coach for the Celtics.  He would also coach the Milwaukee Bucks, Los Angeles Clippers and Philadelphia 76ers.

39. Bob Donham (1950-1954, WS: 18.0)

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    Donham was an Ohio State Buckeye.  He was selected by the Celtics in the third round of the 1950 NBA draft.

    Donham started his professional career before minutes were tracked.  He played for Boston for four seasons, appearing in 273 games and averaging 24 minutes per night in the later three seasons.  He averaged seven points, four rebounds and three assists per game.

38. Dana Barros (1995-2000, 2004, WS: 18.0)

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    Barros played for the Boston College Eagles, leaving as the third all-time leading scorer.  He was drafted by the Seattle Supersonics in the first round of the 1989 NBA draft.  He would later play for the Philadelphia 76ers before signing a free agent contract with the Celtics prior to the 1995-96 season.

    Barros was adept at both guard positions, playing mostly off the bench with an occasional spot start. 

    His best playing days behind him, Barros was a solid contributor, role player and mentor for some of the younger Celtics.  In five seasons, he played 306 games, averaging 23 minutes, 10 points, and 3.3 assists per game.

    He would later play for the Dallas Mavericks and the Detroit Pistons before returning to the Celtics in 2004 for one final game, in which he scored six points.

    Barros is now with the media relations department for the Celtics.

37. Kenny Anderson (1998-2002, WS: 18.3)

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    Anderson played for the Georgia Tech Yellow Jackets.  He was selected in the first round of the 1991 NBA draft by the New Jersey Nets.  He would play for the Charlotte Hornets and the Portland Trail Blazers before joining the Celtics via trade in 1998.

    1999-00 was his best season with Boston, when he started all 82 games for the Celtics at point guard.  He averaged 32 minutes, 14 points and five assists per game while compiling 139 steals, good for ninth most in the league.

    He would total four-and-a-half seasons with the Celtics averaging 30 minutes, 11 points, five assists, and 1.6 steals per game.

    He would later play for the Seattle Supersonics, New Orleans Hornets, Indiana Pacers,  Atlanta Hawks and Los Angeles Clippers.

36. Eric Williams (1995-1997, 1999-2003, WS: 20.5)

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    Williams was drafted by Boston in the first round of the 1995 draft out of Providence College.

    A starter and reserve for the Celtics, his two stints with Boston were separated by an injury-riddled two seasons with the Denver Nuggets.

    Williams played 462 games with the Celtics over seven seasons.  He averaged 25 minutes, nine points, four rebounds and 0.9 steals per game while with the club.

    He would later play for the Cleveland Cavaliers, New Jersey Nets, Toronto Raptors, San Antonio Spurs and Charlotte Bobcats.

35. Ed Pinckney (1989-1994, WS: 23.6)

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    Pinckney played for Villanova in college.  He was selected in the first round of the 1985 draft by the Phoenix Suns.  He would later play for the Sacramento Kings before arriving at Boston by trade in 1989.

    Pinckney was a forward off the bench for the Celtics, playing in 340 games over six seasons for the club.  He averaged 19 minutes, six points and five rebounds for Boston.

    He would later play for the Milwaukee Bucks, Toronto Raptors, Philadelphia 76ers and Miami Heat.

    After retiring, he has been involved in coaching and broadcasting.  He is currently on the Chicago Bulls coaching staff.

34. Tony Battie (1999-2003, WS: 24.2)

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    Battie was a Texas Tech Red Raider in college.  The Denver Nuggets drafted him in the first round of the 1997 NBA draft.  He would play one season in Denver before being traded to Boston.

    Battie would play for the Celtics for five-and-a-half seasons as a reserve, filling any front court position as needed.

    He averaged 22 minutes in 336 games for Boston.  He averaged seven points, six rebounds, and 1.1 blocks per game.

    Perhaps most importantly, on 9/25/2000, he may have saved teammate Paul Pierce's life after a nearly fatal stabbing.  Battie and his brother helped get Pierce to the hospital after the incident.

    He would later play for the Cleveland Cavaliers, Orlando Magic, New Jersey Nets and Philadelphia 76ers.

33. Kendrick Perkins (2003-2011, WS: 26.2)

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    The Memphis Grizzlies drafted Perkins in the first round of the 2003 NBA draft straight out of high school.

    In his seven-and-a-half seasons with Boston he developed a reputation as a low post defender who was capable of defending any of the NBA's big men. 

    His role increased with each season.  In 2009-10, he averaged 28 minutes per game, scoring a career high 10 points, eight rebounds, and 1.7 blocks per game.

    He was traded to the Oklahoma City Thunder during the 2010-11 season.  He played in 454 games for Boston, averaging 22 minutes, six points and six rebounds per game.

32. Kevin Gamble (1988-1994, WS: 27.5)

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    Gamble was drafted out of the University of Iowa in the third round of the 1987 draft by the Portland Trail Blazers.  During his only season with the club he played 19 minutes over nine games, scoring zero points.  They would waive him soon after the season started. 

    The Celtics picked him up a year later as a free agent.  In 1990-91 Gamble played in every game, averaging 33 minutes per night.  He would score 16 points per game, a career high.

    In his six seasons with Boston, he would play in 436 games, averaging 25 minutes and 11 points per game. 

    Gamble would later play for the Miami Heat and Sacramento Kings.  He is currently the Director of Player Development and Video Operations for Providence College.

31. Tiny Archibald (1978-1983, WS: 28.1)

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    Archibald was drafted by the Cincinnati Royals out of UTEP in the second round of the 1970 NBA draft.  He would later play for the Kansas City/Omaha Kings and the New Jersey Nets before joining the Celtics in 1978 by trade.

    He was a three-time All-Star early in his career and in 1972-73 led the league with 46 minutes, 34 points, and 11.4 assists per game.  He would regain some of his former glory with Boston, making the all-star team three more times, from 1980-81 through 1982-83.

    He played 363 games over five seasons with Boston, averaging 31 minutes, 13 points and seven assists per game.  He was in the top five in assists per game in 1979-80, 1980-81 and 1981-82.

    He would play with the Milwaukee Bucks for one season before retiring after the 1983-84 season.

    He was inducted into the NBA Hall of Fame, class of 1981.

30. Dee Brown (1990-1998, WS: 30.3)

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    Brown played college ball for the University of Jacksonville.  The Celtics drafted him in the first round of the 1990 NBA draft.

    In his rookie season, Dee was selected to the NBA All-Rookie first team by playing in all 82 games.

    In the 1993-94 season, Brown averaged 37 minutes, 16 points, four rebounds, five assists and two steals per game.  His steal per game total was good for tenth in the league.

    Brown played in 476 games over eight seasons for Boston, averaging 29 minutes, 12 points, three rebounds, four assists and 1.5 steals per game.

    Brown would go on to play for the Toronto Raptors and Orlando Magic.

29. Antoine Walker (1996-2003, 2005, WS: 32.2)

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    Walker played for the University of Kentucky for two seasons before declaring early for the NBA draft.  The Celtics selected him in the first round in 1996.

    Walker proved very durable at the forward position, playing in at least 81 games in five of his first six seasons.  He made the All-Star team in three of those seasons. 

    In 1996-97 he made the All-Rookie first team.  In 1997-98 he ranked fifth in the NBA with 836 rebounds and 22.4 points per game.

    In 2001-02 he led the league in minutes, with 3406.

    He played 552 games in eight seasons for Boston, averaging 39 minutes, 21 points, nine rebounds, four assists and 1.6 steals per night.

    He went on to play for the Dallas Mavericks, Atlanta Hawks, Miami Heat and Minnesota Timberwolves.  He is currently attempting to get back to the NBA.

28. Larry Siegfried (1963-1970, WS: 33.2)

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    Siegfried was picked in the first round of the 1961 draft by the Cincinnati Royals out of Ohio State University.  He would instead play for the Cleveland Pipers of the soon to be defunct American Basketball League.

    In 1963 he would join the Celtics, at the time a perennial champion.  He would provide a front court presence for Boston, mostly off the bench.  Siegfried was consistently in the top 10 in the NBA in free throw percentage, with a career .854 clip.

    1968-69 was his best season with the club, when he had career highs in most offensive categories.  In 79 games that year, he averaged 32 minutes, 14 points, four rebounds and five assists per game.

    He averaged 25 minutes, 12 points, three rebounds and three assists per game throughout his Celtic career.  He would go on to play for the San Diego/Houston Rockets and the Atlanta Hawks.

27. Don Chaney (1968-1975, 1977-1980, WS: 35.8)

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    Chaney was drafted out of the University of Houston with the Celtics first-round draft pick of 1968. 

    Chaney would make the All-Defensive NBA second team for four consecutive seasons, from 1971-1974.

    His best season was 1972-73, when he posted numbers of 32 minutes, 13 points, six rebounds and three assists per game.  He would play with Boston until the 1975-76 season, joining the Spirit of St. Louis in the American Basketball Association.  He would return to the NBA and play for the Los Angeles Lakers before rejoining Boston in 1977.

    In total, Cheney played in 652 games over 10 Boston seasons, averaging 23 minutes, nine points, four rebounds and two assists per game.

26. Paul Silas (1972-1976, WS: 38.8)

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    Silas would play for Creighton in college before being drafted by the St. Louis Hawks in the second round of the 1964 draft.

    He would stay with the Hawks, then later the Phoenix Suns.  The Suns would trade him to Boston with cash for Charlie Scott in 1972.

    Silas would make the All-NBA Defensive first team in three seasons while with Boston, missing a total of three games over his four Celtic seasons.

    As a forward and center, Silas was impossible to contain, as he would post top ten rebounding numbers in several seasons.  In 32 minutes per game, he scored 12 points and pulled down 12 rebounds per game.

     He would go on to play for the Denver Nuggets and Seattle Supersonics.

25. Bailey Howell (1966-1970, WS: 40.8)

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    Howell played college basketball for Mississippi State University and was drafted in the first round by the Detroit Pistons in the 1959 NBA Draft.

    He would play for Detroit and the Baltimore Bullets for a total of seven seasons before arriving in Boston in 1966 in a trade for Mel Counts. 

    Starting at power forward for Boston, Howell played for four seasons, averaging 18 points and eight assists in 32 minutes per game.

    He would total 323 games for Boston before moving on to the Philadelphia 76ers for one season. 

24. Dennis Johnson (1983-1990, WS: 41.4)

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    Johnson was drafted out of Pepperdine by the Seattle Supersonics in the second round of the 1976 NBA Draft.  He would play in Seattle for four seasons, then three with the Phoenix Suns before playing his final seven seasons with the Celtics.

    Boston's starting point guard, Johnson would make the NBAs All-Defensive team in his first four seasons with the Celtics. 

    Over 541 games, Johnson would average 13 points, six assists, and 1.2 steals over 34 minutes per game. 

    After retiring following the 1989-90 season, he became a scout for Boston, then later a coach.

23. Reggie Lewis (1987-1993, WS: 42.2)

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    Lewis went to college at Northeastern University and was drafted by the Celtics in the first round of the 1987 NBA draft.

    Lewis started in a limited role, getting 405 minutes of garbage time in his rookie season.  Eventually, his versatility was too attractive to keep off the floor.  At guard and forward, Reggie appeared in an average of 80 games per season after that.

    In 1992, he would make the All-Star game for the first time, leading the league in total minutes that season with 3144.

    Lewis collapsed on 7/27/1993 during an offseason workout at Brandeis University.  It was alleged at the time that cocaine use may have been a factor, but the autopsy revealed scarring inconsistent with drug use.  It was instead surmised that he had died from hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    He averaged 20.8 points per game in each of his last two seasons, and he averaged 18 points, four rebounds, three assists and 1.3 steals in 33 minutes per game throughout his career.

22. Rajon Rondo (2006-Present, WS: 42.9)

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    Rondo played for two seasons at the University of Kentucky before declaring for the 2006 NBA draft.  He was selected by the Phoenix Suns in the first round and immediately traded to Boston.

    Rondo is the Boston Celtics starting point guard.  His assists per game has increased in each season through 2010-11, when he averaged 11.2.  He also consistently ranks on the NBA's top ten in steals per game, including a career high and league leading 2.3 in 2009-10.

    Thus far, Rondo has averaged 11 points, four rebounds, eight assists and 1.9 steals in 32 minutes per contest.  He has made the All-Star team in each of the last two seasons.

    Look for Rondo to move up this list.

21. KC Jones (1958-1967, WS: 43.3)

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    Jones was drafted out of the University of San Fransisco by the Celtics in the second round of the 1956 NBA Draft.

    Jones was the floor general for the eight-time champion Celtics during his tenure.  They would win in each of his first eight seasons with the team.

    He played 676 games over nine seasons with Boston, averaging seven points, four assists and four rebounds per game.  He was inducted into the Basketball Hall of Fame in 1989.

20. Kevin Garnett (2007-Present, WS: 43.6)

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    Garnett was drafted out of high school by the Minnesota Timberwolves with the fifth overall pick of the 1995 NBA Draft.

    If I were to make a list for Minnesota, Garnett would be number one.

    Garnett is a surefire first ballot hall of famer, making the All-Star team in 14 of his first 16 seasons, including all four with Boston.

    For a six year stretch starting in 2001-02, Garnett averaged 13 rebounds per game.

    For Boston, Garnett provides unbridled aggression on the floor.  KG just doesn't care what you or anyone thinks.  He is a very angry man.

    He has averaged 16 points, nine rebounds, three assists, 1.2 steals and one block per game over 268 games for the Celtics.

19. Danny Ainge (1981-1989, WS: 46.2)

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    Ainge went to college at BYU.  He was drafted by the Celtics in the second round of the 1981 NBA Draft.

    A point guard, Ainge was a constant and consistent three-point threat.  He was usually amongst the league leaders in 3-pointers made and in 3-point percentage.  His career percentage was 38.6.

    His best season with the Celtics was 1987-88, when he would make the All-star team by averaging 16 points, six assists, three rebounds and 1.4 steals per game. 

    Ainge played 556 games for Boston over eight seasons, averaging 28 minutes, 11 points and five assists per game.

    He would go on to play for the Sacramento Kings, Portland Trail Blazers and Phoenix Suns.

18. Ray Allen (2007-Present, WS: 47.1)

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    Allen attended the University of Connecticut.  He was drafted in the first round by the Minnesota Timberwolves in the 1996 NBA draft.  Allen spent his first eleven NBA seasons with the Milwaukee Bucks and the Seattle Supersonics.

    Allen plays shooting guard and provides a constant deep threat for Boston.  He is the all-time leader in NBA history in 3-pointers made, with 2,612.

    He has averaged 17 points, three rebounds and three assists per game while nailing over 40 percent of his threes.  He has also played in the All-Star game in three of his first four seasons with Boston.

17. Jo Jo White (1969-1979, WS: 58.3)

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    White was Boston's point guard through most of the 70's.  He went to the University of Kansas, and was selected in the first round of the 1969 NBA draft by the Celtics.

    White would make the All-Star team for seven consecutive seasons starting in 1971.  He was also very durable, playing every game in five straight seasons from 1972-73 through 1976-77. 

    White was always on the leagues minutes played and assists leaderboard.  Over his Celtic career, he averaged 37 minutes, 18 points, five assists and four rebounds per game.

    He would go on to play for the Golden State Warriors and Kansas City Kings.

    White is currently director of special projects and community relations with the Celtics.

16. Frank Ramsey (1954-1964, WS: 58.7)

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    Ramsey was known as the best sixth man in basketball, and was enshrined at the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame in 1981.

    He came out of the University of Kentucky and was drafted by Boston in the first round of the 1953 NBA Draft.  Ramsey would play one season, then serve in the military for one season before returning to the Celtics. 

    Ramsey's best season was 1957-58, when he scored 17 points and grabbed seven rebounds in 30 minutes per game.  Ironically, it was the only season that the Celtics did not win the Championship during Ramsey's post-military tenure.

    He totalled 623 games over nine seasons with Boston, averaging 13 points and six rebounds in 25 minutes per game.

15. Tom Sanders (1960-1973, WS: 63.0)

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    Sanders was selected with the Celtics first round pick in the 1960 draft out of New York University.  He would play all 13 of his professional seasons with Boston.

    A forward who could start or come off the bench, Sanders played in every game for four seasons from 1961-62 through 1964-65, averaging 11 points per game over that span.

    Sanders appeared in 916 games for Boston, averaging 10 points and six rebounds in 24 minutes per game.

    He was enshrined in the Hall of Fame as a contributor in 2011.

14. Tom Heinsohn (1956-1965, WS: 69.1)

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    Heinsohn was enshrined in the Basketball Hall of Fame in 1986.  He played the forward position for Boston.  He was chosen with the Celtics "territorial" draft selection in the 1956 NBA draft out of Holy Cross.

    He would make six All-Star teams while with the Celtics. He also is the proud owner of eight championship rings.

    1961-62 was Heinsohn's best statistical season, as he averaged 22 points and 10 rebounds in 30 minutes per game.

    He averaged 19 points, nine rebounds and two assists in 29 minutes per game over 654 games with the Celtics.

    He later would go on to coach the Celtics, then onto broadcasting them.  He is the only person to be involved with the Celtics in one capacity or another in all 17 of Boston's championship seasons.

13. Cedric Maxwell (1977-1985, WS: 74.9)

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    Maxwell played in college for the UNC Charlotte 49ers, leading them to the 1977 Final Four.  He was chosen by Boston in the first round of the draft that year.

    Maxwell would spend his first eight NBA seasons with Boston, appearing in 610 games. 

    1979-80 was his best Boston season, as he averaged 17 points and nine rebounds while posting a league best field goal percentage of .609.

    Maxwell was instrumental in helping the Celtics win two championships in 1981 and 1984.  He would go on to play for the Los Angeles Clippers and Houston Rockets before retiring after the 1987-88 season.

    He would average 14 points and seven rebounds in 31 minutes per game at forward for the Celtics.

12. Ed Macauley (1950-1956, WS: 78.5)

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    Macauley was inducted into the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame in 1960.  He played college ball for St. Louis University, and was the St. Louis Bombers territorial selection in the 1949 BAA Draft.  He would join Boston via "dispersal draft" in 1950, when the Bombers ceased operations.

    Macauley would play in the NBAs first seven All-Star games. 

    He would appear in 414 games for Boston, averaging 19 points, eight rebounds and four assists for the Celtics over six seasons.  He would often appear amongst the league leaders in field goal percentage, with a career Celtic .447 clip.

    Macauley would go on to play for the St. Louis Hawks.

11. Don Nelson (1965-1976, WS: 80.8)

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    Nelson was selected in the third round of the 1962 NBA draft by the Chicago Zephyrs out of the University of Iowa.  He would play in Chicago for one season, then join the Los Angeles Lakers for two before joining Boston as a free agent during the 1966 offseason.

    Nelson would play in eleven seasons for Boston, averaging 22 minutes, 11 points, five rebounds, and two assists per game while helping them to five of their championships.

    He would appear in 872 games for Boston before retiring following the 1975-76 season. 

    He has been an NBA coach for 31 years now, compiling a record of 1335-1063 as of this writing.

10. Bill Sharman (1951-1961, WS: 90.3)

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    Sharman went to the University of Southern California and was drafted by the Washington Capitols in the second round of the 1950 NBA draft.  He was traded to the Celtics after one season.

    Sharman was an excellent free throw shooter, and is ranked 11th in NBA history with an .883 free throw percentage. 

    He helped the Celtics to their first four titles as their starting shooting guard.  He appeared in 680 games over ten seasons, putting up 18 points, four rebounds and three assists in 32 minutes per game.

    He would go on to coach, putting up a 466-353 record over 10 seasons. 

    Sharman was inducted into the Basketball Hall of Fame as a player in 1976 and as a coach in 2004. 

9. Dave Cowens (1970-1982, WS: 93.1)

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    Cowens played for the Florida State Seminoles in college.  The Celtics drafted him with their first round pick in the 1970 NBA Draft.

    Cowens played mostly center with occasional time at power forward for Boston.  He played 10 seasons in Boston, making the All-Star team seven times and helping win two championships in 1974 and 1976.

    In 1972-73, Cowens was selected as the NBA's MVP by scoring 21 points and pulling down 16 boards while dishing out four assists per game.

    Cowens averaged 18 points and 14 rebounds in 39 minutes per game through his Boston career.

    In 1977-78, Cowens was one of only four players in history to lead his team in points, rebounds, assists, steals, and blocks.

    He was inducted into the Basketball Hall of Fame in 1991.

8. Bob Cousy (1950-1963, WS: 100.1)

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    Cousy was basketball's first great point guard.

    He played for Holy Cross in college, and was drafted by the Tri-Cities Blackhawks with their first round pick of the 1950 draft.  Cousy, however, failed to report and ended up in Boston by a strange combination of circumstances.

    Cousy would play in 13 consecutive All-Star games, and was the league's assist leader for eight seasons in a row.  He would also rank on the NBA's top ten scorers list eight times.

    Flashy and aggressive, Cousy ushered in a new era of ballhandling, since emulated by the likes of Pistol Pete Maravich and Magic Johnson.

    He would average 19 points, five rebounds and eight assists in 36 minutes per game through his Boston career, covering 917 games over 13 seasons.

    He was inducted into the Basketball Hall of Fame in 1971. 

7. Sam Jones (1957-1969, WS: 107.5)

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    Jones played shooting guard for Boston for 12 seasons, although he could fill in anywhere else he was needed, aside from center.  He was inducted into the Basketball Hall of Fame in 1984. 

    He was drafted out of North Carolina Central University in the first round of the 1957 NBA Draft.

    Jones was lauded for his quickness and renowned for his clutch game winning shot ability.  He helped Boston win 10 NBA championships.  He would also be selected for the All-Star team on five different occasions.

    His most effective season was 1964-65, when he played in all 80 games, averaging 36 minutes, 26 points, five rebounds and three assists per game.

    He finished with averages of 18 points, five rebounds and three assists in 28 minutes per game over 871 games.

6. Kevin McHale (1980-1993, WS: 133.7)

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    McHale was elected to the Basketball Hall of Fame in 1999.  He helped Boston win three championships in the 1980s, played in seven All-Star games, won the NBA's Sixth Man award in consecutive seasons 1983-84 and 1984-85, made the NBA's all-defensive team six times and was constantly in the NBA's top ten in field goal percentage, with a career mark of .554.

    McHale was selected by Boston in the first round of the 1980 NBA draft out of the University of Minnesota.  He would win Rookie Of the Year in that first season, statistically the least impressive of his NBA career.

    1986-87 was McHale's best, as he averaged 26 points, 10 rebounds, three assists and 2.2 blocks in 40 minutes per game while making over 60 percent of his shots. He placed fourth in that season's MVP voting.

    McHale would appear in 971 games for the Celtics, averaging 18 points, seven rebounds, two assists and 1.7 blocks in 31 minutes per game.

5. Paul Pierce (1998-Present, WS: 137.2)

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    Paul Pierce is "The Truth."

    He has been a starter at small forward for all 13 of his seasons to this point, all with Boston.  He appeared on league leaderboards in steals and points throughout the first half of the 2000s.

    He has, thus far, appeared in 964 games for Boston and has averaged 37 minutes, 22 points, six rebounds, four assists and 1.5 steals per game.

    He was the 2007-08 NBA Finals MVP after helping the Celtics to their 17th championship.

    Pierce is about six minutes of production away from No. 4 on this list.

4. Robert Parish (1980-1994, WS: 137.3)

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    Parish, or "Chief," was drafted out of Centenary College of Louisiana in the 1976 NBA draft by the Golden State Warriors with their first round draft pick.  He would play for the Warriors for his first four seasons in the NBA before being dealt to the Celtics in a trade that would also bring Kevin McHale to Boston.

    Parish was inducted into the NBA Hall of Fame in 2003, his first year of eligibility.  He made the All-Star team in nine of his 14 Celtic seasons.  He would often appear on the league's leaderboard in blocks and rebounds.

    For a four season span starting in 1980-81, Parish would average 19 points and 11 rebounds over 320 games.

    For his career, he averaged 32 minutes, 17 points, 10 rebounds, two assists and 1.6 blocks per game.  He would go on to play for the Charlotte Hornets and Chicago Bulls after leaving Boston following the 1993-94 season.

3. John Havlicek (1962-1978, WS: 151.0)

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    Havlicek was admitted into the Basketball Hall of Fame in 1984 after 16 NBA seasons, all with Boston. 

    Havlicek appeared in 13 consecutive All-Star games, won eight championships, made 11 All-NBA teams, finished in the league top ten in assists seven times and points six times and was the 1973-74 NBA Finals MVP.

    Although he was very productive throughout his career, Havlicek's most productive stretch came from 1969-70 through 1972-73.  In that period, Havlicek averaged 26 points, eight rebounds and seven assists in 44 minutes per night.

    Havlicek is Boston's career leader in minutes and games played, with 46,471 and 1,270, respectively.

    Over his career, he averaged 21 points, six rebounds and five assists in 37 minutes per game.

2. Larry Bird (1979-1992, WS: 170.6)

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    Bird is considered as one of the best players in NBA history.  He was inducted into the Basketball Hall of Fame in his first year of eligibility, 1998.

    Bird made the All-Star team in 12 of his 13 NBA seasons, failing to make the team only once due to injury.  He won the NBA's MVP trophy in three consecutive seasons, 1983-84 through 1985-86.  He made the All-NBA team nine times. 

    He was constantly on the NBA's leaderboards in minutes, points, rebounds, free throw percentage and 3-point percentage.

    During his three season MVP stretch he averaged 39 minutes, 26 points, 10 rebounds, seven assists and 1.8 steals.

    He played in 897 games, averaging 38 minutes, 24 points, 10 rebounds, six assists, 1.7 steals and a career .886 free throw percentage,  good for tenth all-time.

1. Bill Russell (1956-1969, WS: 191.3)

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    Russell was drafted in the first round of the 1956 NBA draft by Boston out of the University of San Fransisco.  Russell was inducted into the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame in 1975.

    He played for 13 seasons with Boston, and it is no coincidence that it is the same 13 seasons in which Boston won 11 championships.  Nobody has more rings than Russell.

    He played on 12 All-Star teams and was the NBA's MVP five times.  Russell was a rebounding specialist, and in his WORST season averaged 18.6 rebounds per game.

    Over 963 games with the Celtics, Russell played 42 minutes per game, averaging 15 points, 23 rebounds and four assists.

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