LeBron James: Why Backing off His Post-Game 6 Remarks Was a Good Idea

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LeBron James: Why Backing off His Post-Game 6 Remarks Was a Good Idea
Mike Ehrmann/Getty Images

A guy who calls himself a "king."

A guy who has "Chosen 1" tattooed on his back.

A guy who feels the need to book a prime time slot on national television and declare to the world his new address whenever he makes a move. 

Are we suppose to believe that this guy does not think he is superior to anyone?

It just so happens that this is exactly what we are suppose to believe. After making post NBA Finals comments that appeared to display his arrogant attitude and his "I'm better than you" mentality, LeBron James has gone on to say that he was simply misinterpreted.

Again.

We should be used to misinterpreting James. From misinterpreting his intentions on "The Decision," to misinterpreting his words after his "karma" tweet with regards to the Cleveland Cavaliers, we are now subject to another vast misinterpretation of James.

Let's assume that James wasn't high on anything when he made his original comments after the final buzzer of the NBA Finals. Let's assume he had some portion of mental consciousness left at the time, and he knew what he was saying and when he was saying it. Can we assume such things? For the purposes of this article, we can.

For those of you who don't quite remember what James uttered when asked what he had to say to the people rooting on him to fail, his response is below:

"All the people that were rooting on me to fail, at the end of the day, they have to wake up tomorrow and have the same life that they had before they woke up today. They have the same personal problems they had today. I’m going to continue to live the way I want to live and continue to do the things that I want to do with me and my family and be happy with that. They can get a few days or a few months or whatever the case may be on being happy about not only myself, but the Miami Heat not accomplishing their goal. But they have to get back to the real world at some point."

If you don't quite understand what James is getting at in this quote, let me help you. James could have easily summed it all up in a simple, "I am LeBron James and I have a better life than all of you losers," or a more family friendly, "I'm just a rich and successful basketball player, get over me and forget about basketball."

There is no doubt, LeBron James is a very successful man. He makes seven figures per year just for suiting up and playing a game. I bet he has a lot of fun spending that money in the offseason. LeBron has a great "real world."

LeBron definitely makes it seem as though he is at the center of this "real world." Right after getting stunned at home by the Dallas Mavericks in the last game of the NBA season with his own pitiful excuse of a "performance" being the main reason of his team's downfall, he is pouring out in the postgame press conference how he is going to be the happy one, and the NBA fans are going to have to suffer on the way back to their "real world."

But these fans have great reason to be suffering. They pay good money to buy crappy overpriced tickets that feed this "king's" godly salary and make him the rich, successful, arrogant and narcissistic man he is today.

And what do they get in return for their investment?

A passive choker who would rather pass to Eddie House than go up against the likes of JJ Barea and implement his own offensive arsenal. These fans are basically paying these players to give them a show worth paying for, especially Wade, Nowitzki and James—the superstars. Wade and Nowitzki delivered, but the "supposed" best player in the world decided to screw the fans and hand Dallas the trophy.

LeBron James is a working man, believe it or not, and even when he fails at his job he still receives top dollar. He is not going to get fired after quitting in the finals. He is going to come back and get a lot of money to be great in the regular season and then most likely fail again when it matters most.

But there are a lot more working individuals in this country, as I'm sure you are aware. People that will, in fact, get fired if they fail at their jobs. No, they don't make nearly as much money as LeBron James, but does that mean they're not as happy? Does it mean they're not as important?

I bet most of them are just as important, maybe even more important than King James.

Teachers, doctors, lawyers, construction workers, business men, authors and more. They all are hard workers and, arguably, contribute more to our society than a man who plays a game for a living. They all have "personal problems" they have to deal with everyday, but is that suggesting LeBron James doesn't? Isn't he the one who was just caught sleeping on the job? If he thinks he can just go spend money with his family and be happy without fixing himself up, then there's another problem right there.

Basketball is a business. It is a form of entertainment. LeBron is the entertainer and the fans know what to expect from him, and they expect him to be great. If you are one of the many LeBron haters, you want and hope he fails at whatever he is trying to do. Most of the time this is just fans being fans, rooting for the opposition to fall so their team can rise above them.

But it is different with LeBron. Hating LeBron has turned into routine for many, and people are fighting to find ways to pick on LeBron's every move, finding faults in almost everything he says or does.

Look at this article, for example. You might say this is an exaggeration to a simple misinterpreted quote by LeBron James after a heated NBA Finals game.

However, the truth is, LeBron wouldn't even had the chance to say that quote if it had not been for his actions prior to that time. If not for "The Decision" and the self-entitlement, LeBron wouldn't have a bunch of haters rooting on him to fail, thus the reporter never has to ask James what he has to say to them.

LeBron brought this on himself, a phrase I bet most of you have heard before from people who have been hating on James recently. A good reason for that is because it is true, and even LeBron knows that. LeBron has a long way to go before he is accepted by the mass majority of people again—if that even does occur.

Unfortunately for LeBron, I am not helping his case out very much.

Looking back on his postgame quote, what does he have to say to his fans? I understand that LeBron was speaking to his haters when he said this, but look at the quote again when I change just one word:

“All the people that were rooting on me to *succeed*, at the end of the day, they have to wake up tomorrow and have the same life that they had before they woke up today. They have the same personal problems they had today. I’m going to continue to live the way I want to live and continue to do the things that I want to do with me and my family and be happy with that. They can get a few days or a few months or whatever the case may be on being happy about not only myself, but the Miami Heat not accomplishing their goal. But they have to get back to the real world at some point.”

At the end of the day, LeBron is speaking to the fans. Whether he meant to target it at his haters or not, they are all fans who have a passion for NBA Basketball, and LeBron's quote goes both ways to the fans.

The loyal LeBron and Heat fans who supported the team and went out to the arena to cheer on their Heat team in Game 6 of the NBA Finals got nothing in return from James, who was busy planning his next vacation. What does LeBron think of them? Should they just get back to the "real world" and forget about this stupid game? 

Hopefully they aren't gone too long because LeBron needs somebody to like basketball—or else he's out of a job.  

 

 

 

 

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