Carmelo Anthony Trade Rumors: Winners and Losers of Proposed Mega-deal

Ryan ComstockCorrespondent IJanuary 17, 2011

Carmelo Anthony Trade Rumors: Winners and Losers of Proposed Mega-deal

0 of 14

    Sam Greenwood/Getty Images

    By nature, a trade is meant to benefit all parties involved, at least from a team perspective.

    Of course, there are always lopsided deals—Pau Gasol to the Lakers, anyone?—but teams generally try to work out an arrangement that will help everyone taking part in the swap.

    That's not always the case for the players, though. Teams have no problem putting talented guys in miserable situations and vice versa. Good players also relish the opportunity to have their supporting casts instantly upgraded through a trade.

    As most NBA fans know by now, trade winds have been swirling around the Denver Nuggets and New Jersey Nets as the latter attempts to get their hands on a bonafide superstar.

    As recently as a few days ago, talks seemed to be at a standstill, but a recent report says that the Nets have now been given permission to talk to Anthony. This intimates that the teams have reached an agreement on the pieces involved with the final hurdle being Anthony's willingness to sign an extension with the Nets.

    That's where the meeting comes in. Nets owner Mikhail Prokhorov will do everything he can to sell Anthony on the team's future and convince him its the place to be.

    The latest word on a potential deal indicated that the Detroit Pistons would be involved, headlined by Anthony, Chauncey Billups and Richard Hamilton heading to New Jersey, Devin Harris and Derrick Favors going to Denver and Troy Murphy moving to Detroit.

    There would also be multiple first-round picks changing hands, and the players involved reportedly range between 12 and 15.

    The other players who could be changing teams are New Jersey's Anthony Morrow, Ben Uzoh, Quinton Ross, Johan Petro and Stephen Graham. Denver would also be sending Al Harrington, Shelden Williams and Anthony Carter packing.

    For different reasons, each team would accomplish their goals with that trade, although it is still questionable what it would do for each organization long term. That's just how it goes with these things.

    So now you're wondering what that would mean for the athletes involved. That's what I'm here for.

    Continue reading for a player-by-player breakdown, looking at who wins and loses with this possible mega-deal.

Carmelo Anthony: Loser

1 of 14

    Streeter Lecka/Getty Images

    When asked about meeting with the Nets, Anthony didn't seem overly thrilled about the prospect, simply saying he didn't want to talk to anybody and that whatever happens is up to Denver's front office.

    It appears that Anthony has no intention of ever putting on a Nets uniform, and the team might be better off just giving up the chase and looking at other options.

    Still, Anthony won't make as much money as a free agent next year as he would by signing an extension with New Jersey right now, so it's certainly possible that a trade will come to fruition at some point before the deadline.

    He would probably be happy about the fact that he would get to home to Brooklyn in 2012 with the Nets, but the team would not be set up for long-term success given that Chauncey Billups and Richard Hamilton are at the ends of their careers.

    Both Denver and Anthony's preferred destination of the New York Knicks currently have better teams than the Nets, so any move that sends him to New Jersey would be a negative for him.

Chauncey Billups: Loser

2 of 14

    Christian Petersen/Getty Images

    Billups hasn't been too happy about a potential move to the Garden State either. He's from Colorado, and reportedly wishes to move into a front office role with Denver once his playing days are over.

    He's even intimated that he would like his contract to be bought out by the Nets if he were to be dealt there.

    Like Carmelo, he would end up on a worse team. He's nearing the end of his career and would want no part of such a rebuilding process.

    Being traded to the Nets would not be good for Billups.

Richard Hamilton: Winner

3 of 14

    Mike Ehrmann/Getty Images

    Rip wants out of Detroit. He's been benched in the team's last three games and there are no immediate signs of hope for the Pistons in general.

    New Jersey isn't much better right now, but playing alongside 'Melo and being reunited with Billups would be better for him than what's going on right now.

    He would likely be starting for the Nets and a trade would give him a better chance, no matter how small, of winning before his playing days are done.

Devin Harris: Loser

4 of 14

    Elsa/Getty Images

    Harris is starting for the Nets, and there's been some speculation that a move to Denver would result in him being reserved to back up status.

    The Nuggets believe they have their point guard of the future in Ty Lawson, and would want to get him the seasoning he needs.

    Harris, a free agent after the 2012-13 season, will potentially be traded again this summer if he finishes the year with Denver. Depending on where he goes in such a scenario, he could end up looking for yet another home once he hits the market.

    No one wants to move around that much. He has a much better chance at finding long-term security if he stays put in New Jersey.

Derrick Favors: Winner

5 of 14

    Kevin C. Cox/Getty Images

    Although Favors was recently injected into New Jersey's starting lineup, he's still losing minutes to Kris Humphries.

    The 19-year-old rookie has some serious potential, and he might benefit from moving into a more open offensive system in Denver that would allow him to run more.

    Former Net Kenyon Martin could also provide Favors some tutelage, as they are similar players. A uniform switch would definitely be favorable for Favors.

Troy Murphy: Winner

6 of 14

    nba.com

    Troy Murphy is currently stuck in purgatory. He's in Nets coach Avery Johnson's dog house, and can't get out of it.

    Johnson has sat Murphy on the bench, where he is buried behind Kris Humphries and Derrick Favors on the depth chart. When the New Jersey native has gotten some playing time, it's often been short lived, and he's not even traveling with the team right now.

    Detroit wants Murphy because of his expiring contract, so he'll be finding a new home next year anyway. At least he'd get to play with the Pistons.

Al Harrington: Loser

7 of 14

    Doug Pensinger/Getty Images

    Based on what Harrington has shown us in the past, he will end up just like Troy Murphy if he's playing for Avery Johnson.

    Harrington puts up some questionable shots, doesn't play defense particularly well and isn't a great rebounder. Murphy can rebound, but the other two traits are what got him in trouble with Johnson.

    New Jersey's offensive system is also much slower and less open than Denver's, which would not serve his game well.

Anthony Morrow: Winner

8 of 14

    Elsa/Getty Images

    Morrow is currently missing time with a hamstring injury, but when he plays he's one of the best long range shooters there is.

    He's second on the all-time three-point shooting list in terms of percentage, and Denver's offense is much more similar to the one he played in while with Golden State.

    Before his injury, Morrow was starting for the Nets and, although he would lose some playing time with Aaron Afflalo and J.R. Smith already on Denver's roster, coach George Karl would surely find a way to use him.

Shelden Williams: Winner

9 of 14

    Christian Petersen/Getty Images

    If he were playing for New Jersey, Williams would end up on the floor more often.

    Avery Johnson values players who are tough on defense and can rebound, which are Williams' strong points.

    He also posted a career-high in field-goal percentage with Boston a year ago, and New Jersey's scheme is more similar to the C's than Denver's.

    Williams should be hoping this deal goes through.

Johan Petro: Loser

10 of 14

    Nick Laham/Getty Images

    In actuality, no one really wants this guy. If Detroit does end up bringing Petro in, they would be doing so begrudgingly.

    Petro is getting some decent playing time in New Jersey, but that would change in Detroit, where he'd be at least third on the depth chart.

Stephen Graham: Push

11 of 14

    sports.yahoo.com

    Graham's situation wouldn't change all that much if he was sent to Denver.

    Depending on how the Nuggets configured their starting lineup, Graham could still start or would be coming off the bench.

    He's listed as a small forward, Anthony's position, so there would obviously be an opening. Denver could try to go a little smaller and test out J.R. Smith at that spot, although Graham would still get a good shot at playing time.

    Graham is starting for New Jersey right now, but that's really only until Anthony Morrow gets back.

Anthony Carter: Push, Leaning Winner

12 of 14

    Doug Pensinger/Getty Images

    Carter can play defense, so there's a chance Avery Johnson would give him some run in New Jersey.

    Still, he'd be third on the depth chart, which is the same spot he's in with Denver.

    That makes it a push for him, although the possibility of extra time on the floor leans him toward being a winner just a little bit.

Quinton Ross: Loser

13 of 14

    uk.eurosport.yahoo.com

    He's seeing a decent amount of action, and has even started a few times for New Jersey, but Ross has no offensive game whatsoever.

    That makes him a bad fit for Denver. While there is the possibility that Denver would simply buy out his contract, Ross would then be forced to look for another team, where he'd probably get less floor time than he is in New Jersey.

Ben Uzoh: Push

14 of 14

    Photo by Noah Graham/NBAE via Getty Images

    Uzoh is an undrafted rookie who's pretty much the last guy off the bench for the Nets. That would be the same in Denver, where he'd be behind Ty Lawson and Devin Harris.

    Maybe George Karl sees something in him that would lead to increased minutes, but it's unlikely.

    Uzoh's situation in Denver would be exactly the same as it is in New Jersey.