Despite Series Split, Lakers Frontcourt Dominating 2010 NBA Playoffs

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Despite Series Split, Lakers Frontcourt Dominating 2010 NBA Playoffs
Lisa Blumenfeld/Getty Images

The Boston Celtics evened their series with the Los Angeles Lakers on Sunday night courtesy of a dominant performance from their backcourt. Highlighted by Ray Allen’s endless three parade and Rajon Rondo’s triple double, the Celtics’ starting guards combined for 51 points, 15 rebounds, 12 assists and connected on 9-of-12 shooting from beyond the arc. While the Celtics were able to escape Los Angeles with a 1-1 series split, concern has to be brewing in Beantown.

Maybe even more impressive than the performance of Boston’s backcourt was the play of the Lakers’ frontcourt of Pau Gasol and Andrew Bynum. Los Angeles’ twin towers dominated for the second game in a row, tag teaming for a 46-point, 13-block effort.

The Lakers’ length has definitely been giving the Celtics trouble inside and it really showed on Sunday. Most troubling for Boston is that the matchup between Gasol and Kevin Garnett has been largely one-sided so far. Gasol exposed Garnett in both games at the Staples Center, going off for 48 points, 22 rebounds, nine blocks and six assists compared to Garnett’s 22 points, 10 rebounds and seven assists.

There was a point in time when Garnett’s two-game total would’ve been generated in one outing but that time seems ages ago at this point. Garnett’s Game Two effort of six points and six rebounds was badly overshadowed by Gasol’s 25-point, eight-rebound and six-block display. Even Bynum added 21 points and controlled the Celtics’ half court offense for much of the night with seven blocks. Bynum’s presence has been in full effect in both games so far but his showing in Game Two was nothing short of brilliant.

Allen’s hot hand was key for Boston because his long distance attempts were the only shots that Gasol or Bynum were too far away from to swat down. But unless Allen can keep up the flawless jump shot sessions, the Celtics can ill afford to continue to be dominated in the frontcourt battle.

Allen’s a great shooter but his otherworldly precision shouldn’t be expected to continue throughout the series and Boston head coach Doc Rivers may have a crisis developing with Garnett’s sudden slump and reserve forward Rasheed Wallace’s inspired play.

Rivers could’ve easily played Wallace in favor of Garnett down the stretch of Game Two and probably would’ve avoided much criticism. Garnett had been a walking corpse until the final period before rewarding Rivers with a strong finish and helping the Celtics coach avoid a crucial decision for another night at least.

One of Boston’s best traits during their three-year run has been their collective selflessness. The Celtics have no problem taking advantage of whatever matchup that’s working in their favor. They don’t force-feed a bad matchup for the sake of getting a guy on the stat sheet, that’s not their M.O. The ability to attack with either their frontcourt or backcourt is one of the luxuries that the team has enjoyed in eight of the 10-playoff series they’ve been in since 2008.

The few times that the Celtics didn’t have that luxury were against Orlando in the 2009 semifinals and now. Boston lost that series against Orlando as their starting power forward/center combo of Perkins and Glen Davis (who was subbing in for an absent Garnett) was upstaged by the Magic’s Rashard Lewis/Dwight Howard combination as Orlando won the last two games of the series.

The Celtics frontcourt has been outplayed again so far in this series but they have a 1-1 split to show for it. But Boston also led Orlando 3-2 before eventually succumbing to the Magic’s matchup advantage and if the Celtics starting big men don’t play light years better in Boston, a similar fate could be in store.

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