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B/R MLB 500: Top 500 Players for 2014

Zachary D. RymerMLB Lead WriterSeptember 19, 2013

B/R MLB 500: Top 500 Players for 2014

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    Over the past couple of weeks, the B/R MLB 500 series has taken stock of the top players at each position with an eye on the 2014 season, scoring the particulars in several different categories.

    With the individual positions all in the bag, it's now time for the big one.

    We took the 500 players we scored and put them all in one basket. They were subsequently ordered from 500 to one, and now they're in a slideshow.

    Before you run away screaming at the thought of sifting through a book-length slideshow, don't worry. There are only individual slides for the top 100 players, with everyone between 101 and 500 arranged in the other slides in groups of 50.

    Another thing to know is this: A lot of players ended up with the same scores (e.g. close to 30 players ended up getting scores of 60). Our protocol in the event of ties in the positional rankings was to give the edge to the player we'd rather have, and we stuck with the same protocol with the top 500.

    As for the prospects, they were scored and analyzed by Bleacher Report prospect guru Mike Rosenbaum.

    That's all there is to it. Start the show whenever you're ready.

Links and Sources

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    If you've missed any or all of the positional rankings in the B/R MLB 500 series, the links are below:

    Top 35 First Basemen

    Top 35 Second Basemen

    Top 35 Shortstops

    Top 35 Third Basemen

    Top 150 Starting Pitchers

    Top 35 Catchers

    Top 70 Corner Outfielders

    Top 40 Center Fielders

    Top 10 Designated Hitters

    Top 55 Relief Pitchers

    Each individual slideshow contains shoutouts to the various websites that contributed data that informed the analyses, but they each deserve another one.

    Baseball-Reference.com provided basic stats. FanGraphs offered more complex stats, most notably plate-discipline data that was referenced for both hitters and pitchers. Brooks Baseball afforded spray charts; zone profiles; and, most importantly, pitch data. Pitch types, velocity and movement data all came from there.

    Lastly, Baseball Prospectus produced additional data and was particularly handy in forming the health sections by way of its injury records. Rotoworld helped with more recent injury updates.

500-451: Doumit-Soriano

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    Brad Rempel-USA TODAY Sports

    500. Ryan Doumit, DH, Minnesota Twins

    40/85

    This has been a subpar season for Doumit. He's gotten away from some of the things that made him a quality hitter in the past, and he has also seen his power take a sharp decline. But even with these trends taken into account, his bat isn't entirely useless. 

    499. Reed Johnson, OF, Atlanta Braves

    46/100

    Johnson is a guy who has defined the phrase “solid fourth outfielder” better than most for several years. He's not much of a hitter, but he's still a solid athlete and can play all three outfield spots pretty well.

    498. Seth Smith, DH, Oakland A's

    47/85

    This hasn’t been such a great year for Smith’s bat. Still, his power is better than he’s shown, and he’s a guy who can run the bases better than most DHs.

    497. Rickie Weeks, 2B, Milwaukee Brewers

    48/100

    An All-Star as recently as 2011, Weeks’ career has taken a drastic turn for the worse over the last two seasons as his hitting has become terribly inconsistent. He can still hit for power, and his athleticism hasn't gone away completely just yet.

    496. A.J. Jimenez, C, Toronto Blue Jays

    49/100

    Jimenez has always stood out for his defense, which is good enough to profile as a backup catcher, even if his bat doesn’t come around. However, as long as he can stay on the field, he has the potential to exceed expectations at the plate and play his way into an everyday role.

    495. Josh Johnson, SP, Toronto Blue Jays

    49/100

    Johnson's health failed him again, his command was all over the place, and his respectable strikeout rate didn’t save him from hard hit after hard hit. All the same, he still has good stuff and can eat innings when he’s healthy.

    494. Ryan Dempster, SP, Boston Red Sox

    49/100

    Dempster’s flat stuff didn’t play very well with Texas down the stretch in 2012, and it hasn’t played much better in Boston. The bright side is that he gets just enough strikeouts to avoid total irrelevance.

    493. Ross Detwiler, SP, Washington Nationals

    49/100

    Detwiler's 2013 season was derailed by a back injury. While he's a one-dimensional pitcher who doesn't miss a lot of bats or eat a lot of innings, he at least saves face with quality command.

    492. Wade Davis, SP, Kansas City Royals 

    50/100

    There’s no question that Davis' stuff plays better out of the bullpen, as his fastball loses a lot of zip and everything else loses its general crispness when he starts. His stuff is passable, and he also qualifies as a decent strikeout artist as a starter.

    491. Ian Kennedy, SP, San Diego Padres

    50/100

    Kennedy must find his command again, as he absolutely needs it in order to get by with mediocre stuff. But even on a bad day, he's still a guy who can eat innings.

    490. J.A. Happ, SP, Toronto Blue Jays

    50/100

    Happ has neither great stuff nor great command, and he’s been known to have problems with the long ball. He’s also managed to be a decent strikeout artist throughout his career, and he’ll hit the century mark with his pitch count when he takes the mound.

    489. Jason Hammel, SP, Baltimore Orioles

    50/100

    Hammel has lost some zip on his fastball this year, not to mention some crispness on his slider. These things have hurt him, and Hammel himself got hurt in July, ending up on the DL with flexor-mass tightness. He's not much more than an innings-eater.

    488. Jorge Soler, OF, Chicago Cubs

    50/100

    Even though Soler lacks stateside experience and suffered an unfortunate setback this season, he has the natural ability and tools to get to the major leagues in a hurry.

    487. Luke Scott, DH, Tampa Bay Rays

    50/85

    Scott has experienced a turnaround from his poor 2012 season in 2013, in part because he's fixed up his approach and in part because he's done better against lefties. But as far as DHs go, he's really not much more than a slightly above-average hitter.

    486. J.B. Shuck, OF, Los Angeles Angels

    50/100

    Nothing about Shuck is impressive. His bat, glove and baserunning all barely pass for major league caliber. But in the realm of fringy reserve outfielders, he’s been better than most in 2013 and looks like a guy who could stick.

    485. Jose Tabata, OF, Pittsburgh Pirates

    50/100

    Tabata has tended to stand out as one of the most inconsequential players in recent memory, but his bat has had some life breathed into it this year. Because of that, he's a bit beyond the reach of total irrelevance.

    484. Chris Heisey, OF, Cincinnati Reds

    50/100

    Heisey is a lousy hitter, but he has some power to offer and can play some solid D out in left field. These talents make him a good fit as a reserve outfielder.

    483. Melky Cabrera, LF, Toronto Blue Jays

    50/100

    Cabrera has gone from being a guy nobody could get out to being a cheat who now barely qualifies as one of the top outfielders in the game. He was playing in pain even when he was healthy in 2013, so don't give up on his bat just yet.

    482. Dayan Viciedo, LF, Chicago White Sox

    50/100

    Viciedo’s glove is a disaster, and his hitting really isn't much better. But there's power in his bat, and enough of it to potentially make him an above-average regular.

    481. Nick Castellanos, OF, Detroit Tigers

    50/100

    Castellanos has the opportunity to get his feet wet in the major leagues in September. If all goes as hoped, he could be looking at a partial or full-time role in the Tigers outfield next season. While he’s still a bit rough around the edges, his bat is ready to be challenged at the highest level.

    480. Conor Gillaspie, 3B, Chicago White Sox

    50/100

    There's not much that's particularly exciting about Gillaspie. He's not a good hitter, power hitter, baserunner or fielder. However, he's good enough at each of these things to get by.

    479. Michael Morse, OF, Baltimore Orioles

    50/100

    Morse’s hitting isn’t as hopeless as he’s made it look with his performance this year, and he certainly has the kind of power bat that’s going to keep him in the big leagues for a while longer. But he’s nothing if not inconsistent, and he's the kind of player who should be banned from playing the field.

    478. J.P. Howell, RP, Los Angeles Dodgers 

    50/85

    There's another southpaw in L.A.'s pen who is better than Howell, but J.P. is a guy who’s death on lefties and who can handle his own against righty hitters.

    477. Tanner Scheppers, RP, Texas Rangers

    50/85

    Scheppers definitely has the arm to be a standout reliever, and goodness knows that he’s shown flashes in 2013. But for now, his command is a bit too hit or miss, and he needs to work on missing more bats.

    476. Jake McGee, RP, Tampa Bay Rays

    50/85

    McGee hasn't followed through on his brilliant 2012 season in 2013, suffering from regressions in command and his ability to miss bats. But there’s no mistaking that he has a live arm, and any non-LOOGY lefty is a good guy to have in a bullpen.

    475. Jose Molina, C, Tampa Bay Rays

    50/100

    Molina can’t hit, hit for power or run, but every catcher in the big leagues could stand to learn a thing or two from him about playing the catcher position. If nothing else, they can take framing lessons from him.

    474. Kendrys Morales, DH, Seattle Mariners

    50/85

    Morales' quietly excellent 2009 season is a distant memory at this point, but he can still hit. His numbers will only go so high, though he can manage a .330-.340 OBP and a slugging percentage in the mid-.400s.

    473. Roy Halladay, SP, Philadelphia Phillies

    50/100

    The jury's still out on whether Halladay's old stuff will ever return to him. And while you don't want to bet against him, at the same time, it's awfully hard to have faith in the 36-year-old.

    472. Cody Allen, RP, Cleveland Indians

    51/85

    Allen’s command is iffy, and he has a thing or two to learn about pressure situations. However, he does have the right kind of fastball-curveball combination to be a shutdown reliever, as well as the ability to miss bats.

    471. Darren O'Day, RP, Baltimore Orioles

    51/85

    O’Day fits the mold of the gimmicky submariner relief pitcher, as he doesn't have great stuff and has to get by on smoke and mirrors. But there’s no denying that he’s death on right-handed batters and that he’s proven himself as a good guy to have in a pinch.

    470. Samuel Deduno, SP, Minnesota Twins

    51/100

    Deduno has one of the better sinking fastballs in the business, and he has pretty good command of it. Combine the two, and you get a legit ground-ball specialist. He's had arm problems in the past, however, and now his shoulder is messed up.

    469. Juan Nicasio, SP, Colorado Rockies

    51/100

    Nicasio isn't much of a workhorse, but he does have a solid fastball-slider mix, and he makes up for a relatively high walk rate and low strikeout rate by keeping the ball on the ground. He has an ugly ERA this year, but his actual performance hasn’t been that bad.

    468. Jacob Turner, SP, Miami Marlins

    51/100

    Turner’s command is a work in progress, and he should be racking up more whiffs and strikeouts with his stuff. Still, he has a solid arsenal of pitches to work with, and his ability to keep the ball on the ground has been good enough to allow him to get by.

    467. John Jaso, DH, Oakland A's

    51/85

    There’s no question that Jaso makes for a better DH than he does a catcher. He doesn't offer much power, but his talent for getting on base is commendable.

    466. Matt Davidson, 3B, Arizona Diamondbacks

    52/100

    Davidson will never wow anyone with his overall play, but he has the ability to be a decent hitter with above-average power. He could even make an All-Star team or two if he continues to improve on both sides of the ball.

    465. Freddy Galvis, 2B, Philadelphia Phillies

    52/100

    There's not much to speak of when it comes to Galvis' bat, but he's a terrific defender who's well cut out for a life as a slick-fielding second baseman.

    464. John Mayberry Jr., OF, Philadelphia Phillies

    52/100

    Mayberry’s the kind of player who’s hard to get excited about, but he has some power in his bat and a versatile glove that's useful when he plays right field.

    463. Logan Forsythe, 2B, San Diego Padres

    52/100

    Jedd Gyorko is the man at second base for the Padres, but Forsythe held his own as a regular down the stretch in 2012. He's got solid pop, can run the bases and can play defense decently enough.

    462. Andy Pettitte, SP, New York Yankees

    52/100

    It suddenly doesn't sound like a lock that 2013 will be Pettitte's last season in the bigs. Given the way he's pitched, he certainly has a good excuse to come back in 2014. His stuff is still flat, but he's had more velocity this year than he did in 2012. He also still commands the ball well.

    461. Bud Norris, SP, Baltimore Orioles

    52/100

    Norris fits the mold of a No. 5 starter about as well as any pitcher in the majors. He has decent velocity on his fastball and a pretty good slider, but that’s about all he has. His control is suspect, and he’s had problems with the long ball in the past.

    460. Jon Niese, SP, New York Mets

    52/100

    It’s hard to rave about Niese’s stuff, but the mediocre walk rate he has this year doesn’t reflect the kind of command he has. He does himself a favor by keeping batted balls on the ground better than 50 percent of the time. 

    459. Zach McAllister, SP, Cleveland Indians

    52/100

    McAllister throws a lot of fastballs, so it’s a good thing he can run his up to 93 and pitch up in the zone effectively enough to get by. While he struggles to get through six innings consistently, his workhorse ability would be worse off if he weren’t capable of topping the 100-pitch threshold with regularity.

    458. Dan Straily, SP, Oakland A's

    52/100

    Straily appeared on the radar last year by racking up strikeouts at an impressive rate in Triple-A, and that skill has translated fairly well to the big leagues, despite a lack of truly impressive stuff. Though only to a slight degree, he's also improved on the command he showed during his cup of coffee in 2012.

    457. Danny Duffy, SP, Kansas City Royals

    52/100

    Duffy hasn’t been back from Tommy John surgery for very long, and there are obviously still some question marks. But since he’s still a hard-throwing lefty with a good hook and changeup, Duffy should definitely be on everyone’s radar in 2014.

    456. Casey Fien, RP, Minnesota Twins

    52/85

    Fien’s a guy with a modest ERA and barely even a hint of a reputation as a shutdown reliever. But relievers who can throw strikes are always good to have, and Fien can do that and miss a few bats.

    455. Matt Belisle, RP, Colorado Rockies

    52/85

    Belisle's terrific command helps make up for his lack of overpowering stuff, and he's going to do the job more often than not. He has, however, seen his status as a shutdown reliever take a few hits over the last couple years.

    454. Alberto Callaspo, 3B, Oakland A's

    52/100

    Callaspo was more than just a viable regular a few years back, but his bat is subpar for the position, and his defense has taken a step back in 2013. The best thing that can be said is that he's better than he's shown, both at the plate and in the field.

    453. Trevor Plouffe, 3B, Minnesota Twins

    52/100

    Plouffe is far from a star-caliber player, as his bat and defense are just too inconsistent. He does, however, have some decent pop to offer.

    452. Brandon Kintzler, RP, Milwaukee Brewers

    52/85

    A nobody before 2013, Kintzler has put his sinker and command to good use in 2013, racking up tons of ground balls and proving himself as a guy who can handle tough innings.

    451. Rafael Soriano, RP, Washington Nationals

    52/85

    Soriano has a big contract and has topped 40 saves once again in 2013, but think twice before labeling him an elite reliever. He's still effective, but he's losing velocity, and his struggles to miss bats this season are a legit concern.

450-401: Young-Ogando

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    Chris Humphreys-USA TODAY Sports

    450. Michael Young, 3B, Los Angeles Dodgers

    52/100

    Young is a disaster of a defender at third base, and his best days as a power hitter have long since passed. However, his bat isn't totally dead just yet. He can still hit.

    449. Lonnie Chisenhall, 3B, Cleveland Indians

    52/100

    It's still up in the air as to whether Chisenhall's bat is good enough for him to cut it as a regular, but he has some decent power at his disposal and isn't a value vacuum on the basepaths or in the field. 

    448. Adam Dunn, DH, Chicago White Sox

    52/85

    Whether or not Dunn will even be back in 2014 is up in the air. But seeing as how he’s still very much useful as a power specialist, there’s still a place for him in the MLB if he wants to stick around.

    447. Mike Olt, 3B, Chicago Cubs

    53/100

    Assuming he regains his feel at the plate and that the vision issue that plagued him earlier this season is a thing of the past, Olt should be able to post a .250 batting average with 25-plus home runs in his best seasons.

    446. Arismendy Alcantara, 2B, Chicago Cubs

    53/100

    Alcantara has always shown explosive tools on both sides of the ball, but his inability to stay healthy delayed the development of his secondary skills. After the strides he’s made this season in his first taste of the Double-A level—not to mention the impressive power-speed numbers—he could find himself a part of the Cubs infield by the middle of 2014.

    445. Carlos Correa, SS, Houston Astros

    53/100

    Correa is a physically blessed shortstop with the potential for five above-average or better tools at maturity. He’s still growing into his large but athletic frame and will likely endure some rough stretches along the way, but there’s no reason to believe that he won’t be a top-tier shortstop with legitimate MVP potential.

    444. Eric Young Jr., OF, New York Mets

    53/100

    Young is in the majors because of his speed. It's a good thing that he puts it to good use, and his bat packs just enough punch to make him a bit more than a mere pinch-running specialist.

    443. Kyle Blanks, OF, San Diego Padres

    53/100

    Blanks hasn’t put it all together yet, but he’s shown signs this season that he could do so in the near future to become regular with solid power. The trick will be for him to stay on the field.

    442. Lucas Duda, OF, New York Mets

    53/100

    Avert your eyes when Duda is playing the field, but his bat is not something to be underestimated, in light of what he was doing earlier in 2013. He's not much for batting average, but he can get on base and he has some legit pop.

    441. Jose Lobaton, C, Tampa Bay Rays

    53/100

    Lobaton has come alive in 2013 thanks in large part to an increased line-drive habit. There are more well-rounded catchers than him out there, but good hitting catchers are always welcome.

    440. Jaime Garcia, SP, St. Louis Cardinals

    53/100

    Garcia’s health is a huge question mark, as he has Tommy John in his history and more recently had to go in for surgery to repair a labrum tear after missing big chunk of time in 2012 with a bad shoulder. But he has a track record as a solid pitcher, with good command and a surprising ability to miss bats. 

    439. Chad Billingsley, SP, Los Angeles Dodgers

    53/100

    Billingsley isn’t going to be seen until later in 2014, as he’s going to be recovering from his April Tommy John operation for a while longer still. But don’t forget about him in the meantime, as he’s a pitcher with a deep repertoire and a solid strikeout ability.

    438. John Danks, SP, Chicago White Sox

    53/100

    Danks gets by on very good command of his pitches rather than stuff, and this year his efficiency has made him a solid bet to pitch into the seventh. One major drawback is that it’s easy to get the ball in the air off him, and he’s had all sorts of trouble with the ball going over the fence in 2013.

    437. Chris Capuano, SP, Los Angeles Dodgers

    53/100

    Capuano is a survivor of not one but two Tommy John operations, and his injury history has only grown larger this year. He also has underwhelming stuff, with a fastball that sits 89-90 and secondaries that aren’t liable to freeze hitters at the plate. But when he has his command, he gets by OK.

    436. Brendan Ryan, SS, New York Yankees

    53/100

    It's not much of a secret that Ryan's bat is about as useless as they come, but his defense is extremely good at a position where extremely good defense is very much of use. His glove alone is good for a couple wins per season (actual fact).

    435. Asdrubal Cabrera, SS, Cleveland Indians

    53/100

    In no time at all, Cabrera has gone from being an All-Star player to a guy who barely makes the cut as one of the league’s top shortstops. But since he still has some power to offer, he's not totally irrelevant just yet.

    434. Raul Ibanez, OF, Seattle Mariners

    53/100

    It’s up in the air as to whether Ibanez will even return for another season in 2014. But if he does, he’s made it pretty clear that he still has power to offer, even if it means having to live with an inconsistent bat and a terrible glove.

    433. Derek Jeter, SS, New York Yankees

    53/100

    If we're being honest, Jeter's 2013 season has been disastrous to the point that he shouldn't even be on this countdown. But we know from his track record that he can hit, and that track record is plenty long enough for the benefit of the doubt.

    432. Christian Bethancourt, C, Atlanta Braves

    54/100

    Bethancourt has the potential to impact the game in a variety of ways behind the plate and still has plenty of room for improvement. If he can come close to reaching his offensive ceiling, Bethancourt could emerge as one of the more well-rounded backstops in the game.

    431. Derek Dietrich, 2B, Miami Marlins

    54/100

    As much work as Dietrich needs both at the plate and in the field, he has the goods to be a power-hitting second baseman. A rare breed indeed.

    430. Junichi Tazawa, RP, Boston Red Sox

    54/85

    That Tazawa’s stuff has lost some electricity from 2012 to 2013 should not be overlooked, but he has some of the best command you’re going to find among relievers. It serves him well.

    429. Gaby Sanchez, 1B, Pittsburgh Pirates

    54/100

    Sanchez is a bit of a has-been as a former All-Star and contender for rookie of the year, but he's proven to be a halfway-decent platoon first baseman who has a good bat and a capable glove.

    428. Khris Davis, OF, Milwaukee Brewers

    54/100

    You should think twice before trusting the numbers that Davis has put up in his brief time in the majors, and exactly how he fits into Milwaukee’s plans is a question mark. But he’s made it clear that he can hit, and there should be some power in his bat, even after his HR/FB rate deflates.

    427. Rajai Davis, OF, Toronto Blue Jays

    54/100

    Davis’ game is based almost entirely around his speed. It’s a good thing that he has lots of that and knows how to put it to good use on the basepaths, even if it is wasted in the field.

    426. Yonder Alonso, 1B, San Diego Padres

    54/100

    Alonso’s power leaves a lot to be desired in light of the position he plays, but he gets on base enough and plays good-enough defense to earn his keep.

    425. Wandy Rodriguez, SP, Pittsburgh Pirates

    54/100

    Rodriguez's health is a red flag, but he was pitching just fine when he was healthy. His stuff was as mediocre as ever, but he was working with the lowest walk rate of his career, the result of him throwing more pitches in the zone than usual.

    424. Steve Delabar, RP, Toronto Blue Jays

    54/85

    Delabar is definitely on the map after making the American League All-Star team this year, as well he should be, with his ability to strike hitters out. It's too bad that his command is lacking and that he can be adventurous when it comes time to nail things down.

    423. Sean Doolittle, RP, Oakland A's

    54/85

    As a fastball-only reliever, Doolittle should by all rights be getting smacked around every time he takes the mound. Instead, he's been able to consistently overpower hitters since the moment he arrived and has staked his claim as one of the better lefty setup men in the business.

    422. Ubaldo Jimenez, SP, Cleveland Indians

    54/100

    Jimenez’s days as a guy who could sit in the high-90s with his hard stuff are long gone, but he still has good velocity for a starter, and his slider and splitter can still be nasty on a good day. His issues arise with his command, which can't be trusted.

    421. Nick Markakis, OF, Baltimore Orioles

    54/100

    Markakis has a reputation as a good, solid player, but this is shaping up to be easily his worst season in the major leagues. He can play the field and run the bases well enough, but his bat has been cold for most of the year.

    420. John Buck, C, Pittsburgh Pirates

    55/100

    Buck is not the star that he masqueraded as early in the 2013 season, but his bat has some pop in it, and he can still play passable defense behind the plate. 

    419. Marcus Stroman, SP, Toronto Blue Jays

    55/100

    Although Stroman’s long-term future as a starter is debatable, there’s no question that his stuff is good enough to compete in the major leagues. Given his success this season since returning from a 50-game suspension for performance-enhancing drugs, it’s seemingly only a matter of time until he gets a chance to prove it.

    418. Yordano Ventura, SP, Kansas City Royals

    55/100

    Ventura has taken a huge step forward this season in terms of both his consistency and command, and he's finally looking more like an actual pitcher than a guy who throws really, really hard. 

    417. Garin Cecchini, 3B, Boston Red Sox

    55/100

    Once he has a clear path to everyday playing time in the major leagues, Cecchini has the potential to be an annual .300-plus hitter with a high on-base percentage, 30-plus doubles and 15 to 25 stolen bases.

    416. Jeremy Guthrie, SP, Kansas City Royals

    55/100

    With mediocre stuff and a longstanding inability to miss bats, Guthrie is pretty well established as baseball’s foremost batting-practice pitcher. Living with him means living with hard-hit balls, a good percentage of which find their ways over the fence. At least he can eat innings.

    415. Joe Saunders, SP, Seattle Mariners

    55/100

    This has been the first season in a while in which Saunders has struggled to get through six on a consistent basis. It’s a good thing that he’s still better than most at eating innings, however, as you’re left with the following if you strip away Saunders’ ability to do so: average stuff and an extreme inability to miss bats.

    414. David Carpenter, RP, Atlanta Braves

    55/85

    Carpenter was a nobody in 2011 and 2012 in his time with the Astros and Blue Jays. Leave it to the Braves to turn a guy like that into an effective reliever.

    413. Brett Cecil, RP, Toronto Blue Jays

    55/100

    Cecil owes his respectable standing on this list largely to his deep repertoire, but he does deserve credit for establishing himself as one of baseball’s rarer commodities: a lefty who can be used against both left- and right-handed batters in pressure situations.

    412. Brad Ziegler, RP, Arizona Diamondbacks

    55/85

    Need a ground ball in a pinch? That’s a job Ziegler is more cut out for than any other reliever in the game, and 2013 has seen him morph into one of the most dependable relievers in the business.

    411. Ryan Ludwick, OF, Cincinnati Reds

    55/100

    Ludwick’s health has seen better days, and he's not a good place to look if you want a lesson on hitting, baserunning or defense. But hey, at least he has has power to offer.

    410. Jonny Gomes, OF, Boston Red Sox

    55/100

    Gomes offers two things: power and patience. While that's really all he's got, that's good enough in today's game.

    409. Kelly Johnson, OF, Tampa Bay Rays

    55/100

    Johnson looked like a lost cause as a full-time second baseman in Toronto last season, but leave it to the Rays to take him and make a productive player out of him again. His bat's best days have long since passed, but he still has some pop.

    408. Joel Peralta, RP, Tampa Bay Rays

    55/85

    This has been a trying season for Peralta, as he hasn't missed as many bats as he did in 2012 and has seen his command suffer to boot. But he still boasts quality stuff, and he's still been capable of doing more good than harm in high-leverage situations.

    407. Brett Wallace, 1B, Houston Astros

    55/100

    Whatever hope Wallace had of becoming a star player seems to have passed him by, but it bodes well for him that he's at least unlocked some legit power in 2013.

    406. David Freese, 3B, St. Louis Cardinals

    55/100

    Freese was one of the league's better third basemen in 2012. He's been one of the worst in 2013, especially on the defensive side of the ball. It's a good thing that he's still a better-than-league-average hitter.

    405. Neal Cotts, RP, Texas Rangers

    55/85

    Cotts’ remarkable return does have a “too good to be true” vibe to it, but the stuff he’s been getting hitters out with is legit. Thanks to that, he's done a good job of missing bats against both righties and lefties and has reestablished himself as an effective setup man.

    404. Jim Johnson, RP, Baltimore Orioles

    55/85

    It’s been a down year for Johnson, one that definitely suggests that his 2012 season was largely a product of good luck. However, he still has the command and the quality repertoire to make the grade as one of baseball’s better relievers.

    403. Alex Wood, SP, Atlanta Braves

    55/100

    Wood's stuff isn't eye-popping, but that funky delivery of his has proven to be effective at making his stuff hard to pick up. He's pretty good at missing bats, and he also keeps the ball on the ground well. 

    402. Jason Vargas, SP, Los Angeles Angels

    55/100

    With the exception of his changeup, there’s nothing impressive about what Vargas throws. He’s also tended to be a home run magnet in his career, notably giving up a whopping 35 long balls in 2012. But his command allows him to be efficient and eat innings.

    401. Alexi Ogando, SP, Texas Rangers

    55/100

    Ogando’s arm is a live one, as he can run his fastball between 93-94 with a good slider, and the 2013 season has seen him go to his changeup more often. He also has better command than he’s shown this year. Really, the biggest complaint to be made about him is over his health, which has been an issue in 2013.

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    Jayne Kamin-Oncea-USA TODAY Spor

    400. Ernesto Frieri, RP, Los Angeles Angels

    55/85

    Frieri is the kind of closer who is going to make things interesting due to his poor control, and it’s clear that he needs an off-speed pitch to keep hitters honest. These things being said, his fastball should be cloned and distributed across the land.

    399. Wily Peralta, SP, Milwaukee Brewers

    55/100

    Peralta has a live arm and a good fastball-slider combination, and he gets credit for keeping his hard stuff around the bottom of the zone. However, his command isn't particularly good, and he doesn't miss as many bats as he should. 

    398. Yovani Gallardo, SP, Milwaukee Brewers

    55/100

    Gallardo’s stuff is fading fast, as he’s gone from sitting 93-94 with his hard stuff to barely getting by at 91-92, and his breaking stuff has lost some effectiveness, too. The good news is that his command and ability to miss bats have been a lot better since he returned from the disabled list in mid-August.

    397. Mike Moustakas, 3B, Kansas City Royals

    55/100

    It's not a question of talent with Moustakas; it's a question of his making adjustments. He's shown some hope in that regard since the All-Star break, but his bat still has a ways to go before it's consistent, and there's also a question mark that concerns his power potential.

    396. Ryan Howard, 1B, Philadelphia Phillies

    55/100

    Chalk 2013 up as yet another injury-shortened season for Howard, and it wasn't going so well when he was healthy. He still has some legit pop, but his bat has gotten to be wildly inconsistent. 

    395. Eric Stults, SP, San Diego Padres

    55/100

    Stults is basically Mark Buehrle with a little extra velocity. But he does have good command of his stuff, and his efficiency comes in handy in terms of helping him eat innings.

    394. Jorge de la Rosa, SP, Colorado Rockies

    55/100

    De la Rosa is admittedly having a much better season in 2013 than this ranking indicates. The reasons he isn't higher are as follows: He has good-but-not-great stuff, his command is just OK, he doesn’t overpower hitters, and he can't be counted on for six innings or 100 pitches when he takes the ball. 

    393. Jeff Locke, SP, Pittsburgh Pirates

    55/100

    Locke doesn’t have overpowering velocity, but his four-seam fastball has some serious tailing action on it, and he also has a quality changeup and curveball. That's the good. Now here's the bad: Locke doesn’t throw strikes, he doesn’t miss bats, and he’s not even averaging six innings per start.

    392. Matt Harrison, SP, Texas Rangers

    56/100

    This was a lost season for Harrison due to a series of back injuries that he hasn’t been able to overcome, eventually culminating in his being shut down for good in mid-August. When healthy in 2012, however, Harrison earned himself a nice new contract by being a good command artist who could keep the ball on the ground and rack up innings.

    391. Billy Hamilton, CF, Cincinnati Reds

    56/100

    At worst, Hamilton profiles as a high-level fourth outfielder and a pinch runner. If he develops as hoped, however, Hamilton has the potential be one of baseball’s premier top-of-the-order players up the middle.

    390. Roberto Hernandez, SP, Tampa Bay Rays

    56/100

    Hernandez’s sinker isn't what it used to be, but it's still a quality pitch that he commands well, and it keeps the ball on the ground more often than not. It's too bad he can't keep the ball in the yard.

    389. Matt Tuiasosopo, OF, Detroit Tigers

    56/100

    Tuiasosopo surely isn’t as good a hitter as his numbers say he is, but he’s definitely made improvements that have helped him become a capable hitter. He can get on base and also boasts solid power.

    388. Luis Valbuena, 3B, Chicago Cubs

    56/100

    It’s hard to get excited about guys like Valbuena, but his ability to get on base and his ability to play solid D at the hot corner must be appreciated.

    387. Austin Hedges, C, San Diego Padres

    56/100

    Hedges' elite, game-changing chops behind the plate will make him one of the best defensive catchers in the major leagues upon his arrival. If the bat continues to develop ahead of schedule, Hedges has the potential to reach his enormous ceiling as one of the game’s premier catchers.

    386. Nathan Eovaldi, SP, Miami Marlins

    56/100

    Eovaldi is still a pup as a starter, and his arm and shoulder have already had it pretty rough over the years. But goodness knows he has a live arm with a nasty fastball-slider combination, and his command this season hasn’t been as mediocre as his walk rate indicates.

    385. Dillon Gee, SP, New York Mets

    56/100

    Gee helps make up for having mediocre stuff by having a lot of it, as he has five pitches that he features regularly and varies up his fastball duty between a four-seamer and sinker. He also makes it harder than it should be to square his stuff up, which is all thanks to his easily above-average command. It's too bad he has a scary injury history.

    384. Tommy Milone, SP, Oakland A's

    56/100

    Milone’s stuff is about as “meh” as it gets, with the only pitch capable of raising your eyebrows being his changeup. But he has very good command of his arsenal, and that allows him to eat a solid number of innings.

    383. Justin Morneau, 1B, Pittsburgh Pirates

    56/100

    Morneau is far from the player he used to be, and his health should be trusted only as far as it can be thrown. However, his bat isn't dead just yet, and his power has experienced a welcome revival in the second half of the season.

    382. Drew Smyly, RP, Detroit Tigers

    56/85

    He hasn't been an ace in high-leverage situations in 2013, but Smyly has shown that he has the stuff, the command and the ability to miss bats to be a capable lefty reliever.

    381. Paco Rodriguez, RP, Los Angeles Dodgers

    56/85

    He’s far from a household name, and he doesn't boast overpowering stuff, but Rodriguez is a surprisingly hard guy for batters to square up and has proven to be an effective setup man in 2013.

    380. Josh Collmenter, RP, Arizona Diamondbacks

    56/85

    Collmenter’s not the kind of guy who’s going to come out of the bullpen and blow hitters away, but he has the right mix to get hitters out, and his ability to go multiple innings at a time makes him all the more valuable.

    379. Scooter Gennett, 2B, Milwaukee Brewers

    56/100

    Exactly how Gennett fits into Milwaukee's plans with Rickie Weeks still under contract through 2014 is a dilemma, but he's made it clear in his short time in the majors that his bat has some potential and that he can play passable D.

    378. Matt Dominguez, 3B, Houston Astros

    56/100

    There’s a lot of potential in Dominguez’s glove, but the key for him is becoming more consistent at the plate. If he's able to handle that, he's going to be a power-hitting, slick-fielding third baseman.

    377. Nate Jones, RP, Chicago White Sox

    56/85

    Jones can light up the radar gun with the best of them, and he's getting better at missing bats and keeping the ball on the ground. The catches are that his command needs some work and that he's also struggling to prove himself as an effective setup man.

    376. Henderson Alvarez, SP, Miami Marlins

    56/100

    It’s basically all sinkers when Alvarez is on the mound, but he has made more use of his four-seamer this year and has been rewarded in the form of the two things he desperately needed last year: more whiffs and more strikeouts. It's a shame that he hasn't been healthy for all of 2013 and that he's not much of a workhorse.

    375. Fernando Rodney, RP, Tampa Bay Rays

    56/85

    Rodney’s stuff is still outstanding, and he's been better ever since his early-season struggles. However, his command is a serious shortcoming, and he doesn't miss as many bats as he should.

    374. Scott Kazmir, SP, Cleveland Indians

    56/100

    Kazmir has turned the clock back on his stuff in 2013, and he’s displayed a much better idea of where it’s going than he did when he was last in the majors, in 2011. His ability to eat innings is still very much limited, however, and the DL stint he needed earlier in the season served as a reminder that his health can't be counted on.

    373. Norichika Aoki, RF, Milwaukee Brewers

    56/100

    Aoki is the best in the league at putting the bat on the ball, and he has a terrific arm that fits well in right field. It's too bad that he doesn't have the power for the position and that he's also a mediocre baserunner.

    372. Andy Dirks, OF, Detroit Tigers

    56/100

    He doesn’t always make the game look pretty, but Dirks is the kind of dirt-dog player every team should have. He's a decent hitter who can make things happen out in the field.

    371. Felix Doubront, SP, Boston Red Sox

    56/100

    Doubront is a decent source of strikeouts and ground balls, but his command is still hit or miss, and this season has seen him feature flatter stuff than what he had in 2012. He's not bad for a lefty starter, but he's probably closer to a back-end guy than a mid-rotation guy.

    370. A.J. Griffin, SP, Oakland A's

    56/100

    The only good pitch Griffin has at his disposal is a big, loopy curveball that occasionally jellies a few legs, but his game is more about hitting spots and changing speeds. He’s able to maintain about an average strikeout rate that makes life a little easier, but he’s also a home run magnet.

    369. Phil Hughes, SP, New York Yankees

    56/100

    Hughes' arsenal needs more than just his fastball and breaking ball, and he can still be touched up for home runs easily enough. But in his defense, Yankee Stadium does him no favors. His fly-ball style would play well just about anywhere else.

    368. Brandon Morrow, SP, Toronto Blue Jays

    56/100

    Morrow’s injury track record is now even more distressing than it already was, and it’s all a damn shame. His fastball-slider-splitter combination is deadly when he has it working, and he’s showed much-improved command of his stuff when he's been able to pitch the last two years. 

    367. Tony Cingrani, SP, Cincinnati Reds

    56/100

    Cingrani’s fastball is terrific enough to rack up swings and misses all on its own, and as such it has proven to be an effective weapon for him as a starter. But he could stand to expand his repertoire and harness some command, and the back problems he's experienced are a red flag.

    366. Brandon Beachy, SP, Atlanta Braves

    56/100

    Beachy's elbow didn't respond well to his return to action, but he continued to show off the kind of control he had in 2012 and at times flashed some of his old electric stuff. He's a candidate for a rebound season in 2014.

    365. Victor Martinez, DH, Detroit Tigers

    56/85

    More power would be nice, and it’s a good idea to avert your eyes when Martinez is running the bases. But after a very slow start to his season, he’s done nothing but make it clear that he can still hit with the best of 'em.

    364. Byron Buxton, CF, Minnesota Twins

    57/100

    With potential plus tools to his name, it’s obvious why Buxton is regarded as baseball’s consensus No. 1 prospect. Beyond his eye-popping natural ability, the outfielder possesses secondary skills that are uncommon in a player his age.

    363. Corey Hart, 1B, Milwaukee Brewers

    57/100

    Hart hasn't played in 2013 as he's recovered from various injuries, so he naturally didn't make out so well in the health portion of this project. But fully healthy, he offers a solid approach at the plate and some power to go with it.

    362. Sean Marshall, RP, Cincinnati Reds

    57/85

    There are better relievers in high-leverage situations than Marshall, and there are certainly relievers who come with fewer health concerns. But any lefty with two nasty breaking balls, good command and an ability to miss bats is a lefty who'd be a welcome addition to any bullpen.

    361. Yasmani Grandal, C, San Diego Padres

    57/100

    Grandal’s career has had nothing but bad things happen to it since the end of his promising rookie season, as he was first busted by the PED police and then busted in a major way by the injury bug. But he has a better bat than most catchers and is a good receiver behind the dish.

    360. Cliff Pennington, SS, Arizona Diamondbacks

    57/100

    Pennington can't hit much, but he's one of the best defenders in the business at shortstop. Because it's a premium defensive position, that's worth something.

    359. Trevor Cahill, SP, Arizona Diamondbacks

    57/100

    Cahill is one of the game’s preeminent sinkerballers, throwing his sinker over half the time and using it to consistently rack up high ground-ball rates. He’s prone to inconsistency, however, and that's been the case this season. 

    358. Paul Maholm, SP, Atlanta Braves

    57/100

    The depth of Maholm’s repertoire is good enough to make up for the relative mediocrity of his pitches, and he has the control to make these mediocre pitches effective. But he can be hit hard when the smoke and mirrors aren’t working, and he’s the kind of innings eater who’s really only good for six innings.

    357. Ryan Vogelsong, SP, San Francisco Giants

    57/100

    Vogelsong’s repertoire runs deep, as he’s featured a four-seamer, two-seamer, cutter, curveball and changeup all at least 10 percent of the time in 2013. But while his command can be impeccable when he’s on, he’s generally not much for pounding the zone, is only about average at limiting walks and isn't particularly good at missing bats.

    356. Jordy Mercer, SS, Pittsburgh Pirates

    57/100

    Mercer isn't the best defensive shortstop you're going to come across, but he has a good bat for the position, which qualifies him as an above-average regular.

    355. Darwin Barney, 2B, Chicago Cubs

    57/100

    Barney can’t hit, but anybody looking for a sure thing on defense at second base is required to at least glance in his direction.

    354. Drew Stubbs, OF, Cleveland Indians

    57/100

    You never know what you’re going to get when Stubbs is at the plate, but his bat has recovered a bit from his disastrous 2012 season. He also offers speed and solid defense in right field.

    353. Ryan Hanigan, C, Cincinnati Reds

    57/100

    Hanigan’s lousy season at the plate can’t be ignored, but he’s still earning his keep with his work behind the plate. He's one of the best in the business on defense at a position where defense is more important than it is anywhere else.

    352. Alex Avila, C, Detroit Tigers

    57/100

    Avila’s career has taken a downturn since his All-Star season in 2011, and there have been times throughout 2013 when he’s been hard to watch. But he’s a quality hitter for a catcher and has been busy proving as much in the second half when he's been able to get in the lineup.

    351. Cody Ross, OF, Arizona Diamondbacks

    57/100

    The move away from Fenway Park wasn't the best move for Ross’ power. However, his bat is decent, and he has a good glove that's versatile to boot. His low standing in these rankings has a lot to do with his hip injury.

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    350. Chris Denorfia, OF, San Diego Padres

    57/100

    Denorfia's bat is nothing special, as he's not particularly good at getting on base or hitting for power. But he can run the bases and is useful in the outfield.

    349. Miguel Gonzalez, SP, Baltimore Orioles

    57/100

    Gonzalez is mainly a fastball-splitter pitcher with basically average control and not much ability to gather whiffs and strikeouts. He also doesn’t keep the ball on the ground very well, which helps contribute to a minor home run problem. Yet he gets by OK and is capable of eating a solid number of innings to boot.

    348. Josh Hamilton, OF, Los Angeles Angels

    57/100

    Yup, it's come to this for Josh Hamilton. His approach at the plate has been just as frustrating in 2013 as it was down the stretch in 2012, and he's also lost some power. He's not the superstar player he's being paid to be.

    347. David Lough, OF, Kansas City Royals

    57/100

    Maybe it’s a bit too soon to call Lough a late bloomer, but he’s given the Royals a boost with a decent bat and quality defense in right and left fields. He's been one of the more unsung heroes of the AL Central in 2013.

    346. Michael Wacha, SP, St. Louis Cardinals

    57/100

    Wacha works in the 91-93 range with his fastball when starting, and his changeup has the look of a plus offering. He’s also shown some solid command and has missed some bats, though not as many as a starter compared to as a reliever. In short, the early returns on him are encouraging.

    345. Joe Kelly, SP, St. Louis Cardinals

    57/100

    Kelly can run his hard stuff up into the mid-90s, and his arsenal also includes a changeup, slider and curveball that are all solid. He’s overachieved a little bit as a starter, but the goods are definitely there.

    344. Jarred Cosart, SP, Houston Astros

    58/100

    Cosart has been one of the more frustrating pitchers in the minor leagues for the last several years—well, at least until he was called up for the first time by the Astros in mid-July. He hasn’t missed as many bats in the majors as he did in Triple-A, but that hasn’t stopped the right-hander from emerging as the team’s most consistent starter since the All-Star break.

    343. Jameson Taillon, SP, Pittsburgh Pirates

    58/100

    Regarded as one of the game’s top pitching prospects since the 2011 season, it shouldn’t be long until Taillon joins Gerrit Cole, the team’s former top prospect, in the major leagues. The right-hander is one of a select few pitching prospects with two potential plus-plus offerings (fastball/curveball), though his arm action leads to questions about his future command.

    342. Sonny Gray, SP, Oakland A's

    58/100

    Gray regressed across the board in 2012—his first full season in the minor leagues—but showed the ability to make adjustments and learn from the experience. The right-hander hasn’t skipped a beat despite pitching on the national stage and is making a strong case for a spot in the team’s 2014 rotation.

    341. Javier Baez, SS, Chicago Cubs

    58/100

    Although he’s rough around the edges, Baez has the potential to post multiple 20-20 seasons in his prime and appear in multiple All-Star games as a result.

    340. Ryan Flaherty, 2B, Baltimore Orioles

    58/100

    Brian Roberts is the guy with the reputation in Baltimore, but Flaherty has power that helps make up for his lousy hitting. He also offers underappreciated defense at second base.

    339. David DeJesus, CF, Tampa Bay Rays

    58/100

    DeJesus has never been a great player, and he’s not about to become one at his age. But he’s a veteran who can get on base and still hold his own running the bases and playing defense.

    338. Nick Franklin, 2B, Seattle Mariners

    58/100

    Franklin has experienced some growing pains ever since the start of August, but he has the goods to be a second baseman who can hit for power while holding his own defensively.

    337. Kelvin Herrera, RP, Kansas City Royals

    58/85

    Herrera’s numbers don’t look like those of a top-tier reliever, but 2013 has been a tale of two seasons for him. The first was a season in which he was lost in every way possible. The second has seen him recapture the promise of his 2012 season, in which he was a top-15 or maybe even top-10 reliever.

    336. Jesse Crain, RP, Tampa Bay Rays

    58/85

    Crain’s health is about as iffy as it gets, but he was in the middle of a terrific season before the injury bug who took a bite out of him. There was some overachieving going on, but he's a guy with good stuff, good command and a good ability to miss bats.

    335. Grant Balfour, RP, Oakland A's

    58/85

    With non-elite stuff, spotty command and a relatively modest ability to miss bats, Balfour shouldn’t be enjoying so much success. That he's experienced some regression in the second half is indeed a warning sign. But whether it's the rage or something else, he's a guy who gets the job done.

    334. Tyler Clippard, RP, Washington Nationals

    58/85

    Clippard’s magnificent 2011 season looks like an outlier. But armed with his rising fastball and killer changeup, he still has the goods to miss a fair amount of bats, and this season has seen him regain his status as a dominant setup man.

    333. Starlin Castro, SS, Chicago Cubs

    58/100

    Castro should be one of the best players in the National League with the talent he has but has instead been one of the worst in 2013. The only thing keeping him on the radar is his talent, as he should be a shortstop who can hit, hit for power, run the bases and play solid D.

    332. Jimmy Rollins, SS, Philadelphia Phillies

    58/100

    Rollins’ bat has gone missing in 2013, but we're banking on the notion that he still has some power somewhere inside him to go with his solid baserunning and defensive abilities.

    331. Rex Brothers, RP, Colorado Rockies

    58/85

    Brothers’ velocity loss and lack of control are concerning, but he misses bats, does a good job of keeping the ball on the ground and is a lefty reliever who can hold his own against righties. Also, he's been a very sure thing when he's entered games in 2013.

    330. Nick Hundley, C, San Diego Padres

    58/100

    Hundley hasn’t gotten back to being the force he was in 2011, when he had an .824 OPS while playing very strong defense. It's a good thing that he can still hit for some power and handle himself behind the dish.

    329. Jose Altuve, 2B, Houston Astros

    58/100

    Altuve earned an All-Star nod in 2012 on the strength of a near-.300 batting average. That was a tease, as his bat is below average for the position and in general. His best ability is running the bases, which is something he does very well.

    328. Brad Miller, SS, Seattle Mariners

    58/100

    Miller hasn’t been in the majors for long, but he rose fast through the minors, and it looks like he can cut it as a solid hitter at the MLB level. It's possible we haven't seen the best of his power.

    327. Randall Delgado, SP, Arizona Diamondbacks

    58/100

    Delgado has shown much better command than what he had in a disappointing stint with the Braves in 2012. He also has some good raw stuff that should eventually translate to him missing more bats. But for now he’s basically a two-pitch pitcher with a sinker and a changeup, and he's been better at giving up homers than he has been at missing bats.

    326. Jeremy Hellickson, SP, Tampa Bay Rays

    58/100

    Hellickson’s command has been better this year than it was in 2011 or 2012, paying off in the form of a much-improved walk rate. He’s also picked up a few more strikeouts, helping himself by leaving fewer things to chance. However, his changeup-happy approach has come under fire this year.

    325. Tyler Chatwood, SP, Colorado Rockies

    58/100

    Chatwood has some serious stuff at his disposal, and he has some solid command to go with it. His M.O. is to put Colorado’s strong defensive infield to work by generating tons of ground balls. The catch is that he doesn't eat innings.

    324. Matt Adams, 1B, St. Louis Cardinals

    58/100

    Adams isn't an asset defensively at first base, but he has a solid bat and more than solid power. It also reflects well on him that he hasn't had much trouble showing off his power against southpaws.

    323. Alejandro De Aza, CF, Chicago White Sox

    58/100

    De Aza has tools, but 2013 has been a rough year for his bat and an even rougher year for his glove. He's not a bad player, but he's spent the past season removing himself from the ranks of MLB's top center fielders.

    322. Eric Chavez, 3B, Arizona Diamondbacks

    58/100

    Chavez is too old to be a defensive gem, and injuries come with the territory. But his bat is still useful against right-handers, and there's still quite a bit of power to be found in it.

    321. David Murphy, LF, Texas Rangers

    58/100

    This has been a rough season for Murphy at the plate, but he's better than he's shown offensively. Also, don't overlook his defense in left field. He's one of the best in the business out there.

    320. Travis d'Arnaud, C, New York Mets

    58/100

    After enduring so many significant injuries before even reaching the major leagues, health will be a serious concern for d’Arnaud for the duration of his career. However, despite the checkered medical history, he still has the all-around ability and potential to be an All-Star several times over.

    319. Kyle Kendrick, SP, Philadelphia Phillies

    58/100

    Kendrick goes heavy on the sinkers and cutters, using good command of these pitches to try to pitch to contact. He gets plenty of ground balls but could certainly benefit from looking to miss a few more bats.

    318. Scott Feldman, SP, Baltimore Orioles

    58/100

    The best thing Feldman has going for him is his command, and he's done a good job of using that and what stuff he has to rack up ground balls in 2013. But when it comes down to it, he's not much more than an innings eater.

    317. Dylan Bundy, SP, Baltimore Orioles

    59/100

    After climbing from Low-A to the major leagues last year, Bundy was expected to spend a majority of the 2013 season in the Orioles’ starting rotation. However, the right-hander battled elbow soreness out of the gate this spring before eventually having Tommy John surgery in late June. I’m curious to see how he looks next year with a brand-spanking-new elbow.

    316. Kevin Gausman, SP, Baltimore Orioles

    59/100

    Gausman possesses an ideal combination of size, stamina and arm strength—the kind that you want in a frontline starting pitcher. He’s capable of being effective with only a plus-plus fastball-changeup combination. However, Gausman’s breaking ball and overall command will need to improve before he’s offered another crack at the Orioles’ starting rotation.

    315. Brett Anderson, SP, Oakland A's

    59/100

    Anderson’s career has basically been on the rocks since 2010 due to injuries, and that’s the damndest of shames. He has some good stuff, with a fastball that sits 92-93 and two sharp breaking balls, and he’s a terrific command artist when he’s healthy. 

    314. Danny Espinosa, 2B, Washington Nationals

    59/100

    This is going to go into the books as a lost season for Espinosa, as he started the year off hurt and then ended up in the minors. But when he's right, he offers power, speed and good defense at second base.

    313. Jackie Bradley Jr., CF, Boston Red Sox

    59/100

    Bradley will never wow with his tools, but he’s a consistent, well-rounded player who projects as an above-average center fielder with a hit tool and on-base skills that profile ideally at the top of a lineup. 

    312. Dioner Navarro, C, Chicago Cubs

    59/100

    Navarro was about as irrelevant as can be for a while there, but suddenly he’s a power hitter who must be reckoned with. Power is about all he has, but he has enough of it to earn his keep.

    311. DJ LeMahieu, 2B, Colorado Rockies

    59/100

    LeMahieu doesn't have much of a bat, but he plays terrific defense at second base and can add some value on the basepaths.

    310. Jonathan Papelbon, RP, Philadelphia Phillies

    59/85

    Papelbon is declining, and he’s not going to turn things around unless he finds a way to regain some of his old velocity and general explosiveness. But he still has at least decent stuff, and he still has very good command of it. This combination serves him well.

    309. Tommy Hunter, RP, Baltimore Orioles

    59/85

    Hunter should be better at missing bats with so much velocity at his disposal, but he has excellent command, and his ability to collect more than three outs when he appears is very much appreciated.

    308. Luke Hochevar, RP, Kansas City Royals

    59/85

    The Royals presumably weren’t counting on Hochevar merely becoming an effective reliever when they drafted him first overall in 2006, but oh well. He has the stuff and the command for relief work and could prove to be darn good in high-leverage situations if given the chance.

    307. Christian Yelich, OF, Miami Marlins

    59/100

    Yelich quickly emerged as a main cog in the Marlins offense following a midseason promotion directly from Double-A and, more importantly, proved that he belongs in the major leagues. While his on-base skills are valuable at the top of the lineup, Yelich’s ability to drive in runs could also make him a middle-of-the-order threat.  

    306. Casey Janssen, RP, Toronto Blue Jays

    59/85

    Janssen’s not the kind of closer who’s going to blow anybody away, but he has a deep repertoire at his disposal, as well as solid command and a decent ability to limit hits. Best of all, he's only getting better at handling high-leverage situations.

    305. Oscar Taveras, OF, St. Louis Cardinals

    59/100

    Taveras is a special hitter. Provided that he’s healthy next season, he’s a safe bet to rake upon reaching the major leagues and could potentially run away with the National League Rookie of the Year Award. 

    304. Mike Carp, 1B, Boston Red Sox

    59/100

    Carp has been one of the best platoon players in baseball in 2013, and that's no surprise given his solid approach at the plate and considerable power.

    303. Darin Ruf, 1B, Philadelphia Phillies

    59/100

    Ruf doesn't have the most refined approach at the plate, as he strikes out too much and doesn't have BABIP-friendly hitting habits. But he's able to get on base via the walk, and he also offers legit power.

    302. Garrett Jones, 1B, Pittsburgh Pirates

    59/100

    Jones may have peaked with his performance in 2012, but he's not as mediocre as he's shown in 2013 either. A little more luck and a little more power will mean better times in 2014.

    301. Dan Haren, SP, Washington Nationals

    59/100

    Haren likely isn't going to rediscover his old stuff any time soon, but he still has terrific control, and he just plain knows how to pitch. It's worth noting that he's had a decent second half.

300-251: Cashner-Mujica

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    300. Andrew Cashner, SP, San Diego Padres

    59/100

    Cashner is still developing as a pitcher, but the signs are good. He certainly has a live arm and has shown off solid command and an ability to get ground balls. He's going to be dangerous if he starts missing bats as often as he should.

    299. Billy Butler, DH, Kansas City Royals

    59/85

    It’s a shame that Butler hasn’t been able to maintain the power he found in 2012, as it's obviously preferable to have a DH who can hit the ball a mile. However, Butler's still one of the best hitters at any position, not just DH.

    298. Bobby Parnell, RP, New York Mets

    60/85

    There are more reliable relievers than Parnell out there, but he has an electric fastball-curveball combination, and he knows how to command it. That's good enough.

    297. Emilio Bonifacio, 2B, Kansas City Royals

    60/100

    This hasn’t been an easy season for Bonifacio, but the player he's been with the Royals is a much truer representative of his real self than the player he was with the Blue Jays. He's a guy who can get on base and do damage with his wheels, and he's a quality defender at second base.

    296. Chris Carter, 1B, Houston Astros

    60/100

    It can be painful to watch Carter try to hit. But he's a guy who can hit the ball a mile, and he has value as a major leaguer because of that.

    295. Jonathan Singleton, 1B, Houston Astros

    60/100

    As a first-base-only prospect, Singleton’s bat will have to carry him to the major leagues. Luckily, he has a good one that should have him hitting in the middle of the Astros order for years to come.

    294. Kolten Wong, 2B, St. Louis Cardinals

    60/100

    Simply put, Wong is a ballplayer. He doesn’t have flashy tools, but he is capable of doing it all on the field. He projects as a slightly above-average second baseman on a first-division team.

    293. Adam Eaton, CF, Arizona Diamondbacks

    60/100

    Eaton hasn't turned his tools into outstanding production just yet, but the tools are definitely there. He has speed that plays on both the basepaths and in the outfield, and his bat also has some solid potential.

    292. Marcell Ozuna, CF, Miami Marlins

    60/100

    Ozuna isn’t fully formed yet, but his tools are impressive, and he did enough to show that he’s ready to put them to use at the MLB level. He could be a good one very soon if he puts it all together.

    291. Ryan Cook, RP, Oakland A's

    60/85

    This season hasn’t been the cakewalk that 2012 was for Cook, when he was one of the best relievers nobody was talking about. But he has good stuff and good command for a relief pitcher, and he’s still been one of the game’s top setup men even despite his issues.

    290. Gordon Beckham, 2B, Chicago White Sox

    60/100

    Beckham’s ceiling is pretty low due to his subpar power, but he's been a decent-enough hitter in 2013. He also offers solid defense, particularly when it comes to turning double plays.

    289. Eric Sogard, 2B, Oakland A's

    60/100

    Sogard doesn't have much power, but he's been a capable hitter in 2013. He also more than holds his own defensively at second base.

    288. Sergio Romo, RP, San Francisco Giants

    60/85

    It’s a concern that Romo isn’t getting as many whiffs all of a sudden, and another concern is that he’s been beatable in his first full season as a closer. All the same, his slider and control are still valuable commodities, and he's still a highly effective reliever.

    287. Derek Norris, C, Oakland A's

    60/100

    Norris gets on base better than the bulk of the league’s catching corps, and he also hits for some pop and runs the bases. The combination of these things helps make him a decent player, if not a particularly good one.

    286. Nate Schierholtz, OF, Chicago Cubs

    60/100

    The jury’s still out on whether Schierholtz can be an everyday outfielder, but he’s proven himself to be a highly effective platoon player in 2013. That's what good power and a good glove can do for you.

    285. Matt Joyce, OF, Tampa Bay Rays

    60/100

    He’s only a platoon outfielder, but you have to hand it to Joyce for excelling at the role he’s been given. He can hit for power and provide solid defense in both left and right fields.

    284. Junior Lake, CF, Chicago Cubs

    60/100

    Lake is still raw as an outfielder, and his approach at the plate could definitely use some fine tuning. But there's no denying that the tools are there, and those alone have put him on the radar as a potential power/speed star.

    283. Dan Uggla, 2B, Atlanta Braves

    60/100

    Uggla’s power is still his calling card. Thank goodness for that, because he's a lousy fielder at second base, and the only thing he does well at the plate besides hit homers is draw walks.

    282. Logan Morrison, 1B, Miami Marlins

    60/100

    The numbers LoMo has racked up in 2013 don't jump off the page, but he's a hitter who can get on base, and he deserves to have better power numbers. Marlins Park does him no favors.

    281. Michael Brantley, OF, Cleveland Indians

    60/100

    Brantley hasn’t had the same kind of impact in 2013 that he had in 2012, but his game hasn’t tailed off completely. He’s still a quality hitter, and he’s putting his speed to good use on the basepaths and in the field.

    280. Michael Saunders, CF, Seattle Mariners

    60/100

    Saunders doesn't have the legs to play center field well, nor are his legs useful in terms of generating value on the basepaths. It's a good thing his bat works OK.

    279. B.J. Upton, CF, Atlanta Braves

    60/100

    Upton still has tremendous natural talent, but the warning signs were there in 2012 that his game was falling apart, and he’s done nothing in 2013 to prove that it was all a fluke. He may be paid like one of the top center fielders in the league, but he's been one of the worst this year as far as his hitting is concerned.

    278. Mitch Moreland, 1B, Texas Rangers

    60/100

    Moreland is inconsistent when it comes to hitting, but he does bring good power to the table and can play a solid first base to boot.

    277. Brandon McCarthy, SP, Arizona Diamondbacks

    60/100

    Living with McCarthy means living with his injury problems. The good news is that he’s an outstanding command artist when he’s pitching, and his efficiency helps him make up for the fact that he is indeed quite hittable.

    276. Chris Tillman, SP, Baltimore Orioles

    60/100

    Tillman's not quite as good as his All-Star status says he is, as he's not an elite strikeout, command or ground-ball artist. But he does know how to pitch, and he's been a quality innings eater in 2013.

    275. Danny Salazar, SP, Cleveland Indians

    60/100

    Salazar’s fastball-changeup combination is deadly, and he's shown that he has the ability to maintain his stuff deep into games. It was always possible that he'd have to settle for a life as a reliever, but he instead looks like he could be a dangerous starter.

    274. Josh Willingham, LF, Minnesota Twins

    60/100

    You can be forgiven if you forgot that Willingham was even out there, but he has a good power bat and can get on base. If he could run, field or stay healthy, he’d be a star-level player.

    273. Nelson Cruz, RF, Texas Rangers

    60/100

    The big cloud hanging over Cruz’s head right now says “Biogenesis” on it. But below it stands a premier power hitter who will be heard from again.

    272. Jed Lowrie, SS, Oakland A's

    60/100

    Our scoring system admittedly didn't work in Lowrie's favor, as his shortcomings as a baserunner and defensive player loomed just as large as his hitting talents. However, let the record show that he's been one of the best-hitting shortstops in the league in 2013.

    271. Yoenis Cespedes, LF, Oakland A's

    60/100

    Cespedes has loads of talent, but he's failed to put it all together in 2013 after teasing himself as a potential MVP in 2012. This is not to call him a scrub, mind you, as even in a trying season he's still offered a solid bat, good power and very good defense.

    270. Eddie Butler, SP, Colorado Rockies

    61/100

    Butler isn’t as well known as many of his peers, but he should be. The right-hander has three pitches that grade as plus or better, as well as a vastly underrated feel for pitching. The only question is whether his arm action and command will translate at the highest level.

    269. Robert Stephenson, SP, Cincinnati Reds

    61/100

    Stephenson has taken off over the last year thanks to a fastball that touches elite velocity and a surprisingly advanced feel for pitching. His curveball has become a more consistent pitch this season and played a role in the right-hander’s success at more advanced levels. Stephenson has the ceiling of a front-line starting pitcher.

    268. Addison Russell, SS, Oakland A's

    61/100

    Although he’s looked raw at times this season as a 19-year-old in High-A, Russell has the makings of a dynamic shortstop at the major league level, with four above-average or better tools that will only improve with experience.

    267. Jason Motte, RP, St. Louis Cardinals

    61/85

    Motte hasn't been seen in 2013, but he should be along sometime early in 2014 season. If all goes well, he'll recapture his old stuff and command and go back to being one of the MLB's more overpowering late-inning relievers.

    266. Hank Conger, C, Los Angeles Angels

    61/100

    The Angels have one guy who was supposed to be a good catcher and one guy who actually is a good catcher. Conger is the latter guy. He can hit for some pop and handle the position finely on the defensive end, particularly when it comes to receiving the ball.

    265. Tim Hudson, SP, Atlanta Braves

    61/100

    By all rights, Hudson should rank higher on this list, as he’s a pitcher with a deep repertoire, good command and a longstanding expertise at racking up ground balls. But the ankle injury he suffered in July was a brutal one that only added to an extensive list of injuries he's suffered throughout his career.

    264. Jarrod Dyson, CF, Kansas City Royals

    61/100

    Dyson’s game is all about speed. It’s a good thing that he does a good job of putting it to use both on the basepaths and in the outfield, because there’s not much there if you take away his wheels.

    263. Chris Young, CF, Oakland A's

    61/100

    Young hasn't been heard from very often during his time as a platoon player in 2013, but he shouldn't be judged by this silence too much. He's a good-fielding center fielder with power in his bat and speed to use on the basepaths. Such things come in handy.

    262. Addison Reed, RP, Chicago White Sox

    61/85

    Reed still doesn't come off as a finished product just yet, but he has made improvements with his command and his ability to miss bats in 2013. Naturally, he's been a more effective pitcher, and it bodes well for him that he appears to be trending in the right direction.

    261. Justin Smoak, 1B, Seattle Mariners

    61/100

    There’s still some untapped potential in Smoak's bat. But with more hits falling and a decent number of them being sent a long way, his bat is certainly more alive than it's ever been.

    260. Mike Leake, SP, Cincinnati Reds

    61/100

    Leake's stuff is far from overpowering, but he commands it well enough to avoid walks better than the average pitcher. He also eats a decent number of innings for a back-end guy. 

    259. Carlos Quentin, LF, San Diego Padres

    61/100

    There’s nothing wrong with Quentin’s bat, as he can get on base and hit for power. Ideal stuff for a corner outfielder. It’s his baserunning, fielding and health tha