B/R MLB 500: Top 500 Players for 2014

Zachary D. RymerMLB Lead WriterSeptember 19, 2013

B/R MLB 500: Top 500 Players for 2014

0 of 109

    Over the past couple of weeks, the B/R MLB 500 series has taken stock of the top players at each position with an eye on the 2014 season, scoring the particulars in several different categories.

    With the individual positions all in the bag, it's now time for the big one.

    We took the 500 players we scored and put them all in one basket. They were subsequently ordered from 500 to one, and now they're in a slideshow.

    Before you run away screaming at the thought of sifting through a book-length slideshow, don't worry. There are only individual slides for the top 100 players, with everyone between 101 and 500 arranged in the other slides in groups of 50.

    Another thing to know is this: A lot of players ended up with the same scores (e.g. close to 30 players ended up getting scores of 60). Our protocol in the event of ties in the positional rankings was to give the edge to the player we'd rather have, and we stuck with the same protocol with the top 500.

    As for the prospects, they were scored and analyzed by Bleacher Report prospect guru Mike Rosenbaum.

    That's all there is to it. Start the show whenever you're ready.

Links and Sources

1 of 109

    If you've missed any or all of the positional rankings in the B/R MLB 500 series, the links are below:

    Top 35 First Basemen

    Top 35 Second Basemen

    Top 35 Shortstops

    Top 35 Third Basemen

    Top 150 Starting Pitchers

    Top 35 Catchers

    Top 70 Corner Outfielders

    Top 40 Center Fielders

    Top 10 Designated Hitters

    Top 55 Relief Pitchers

    Each individual slideshow contains shoutouts to the various websites that contributed data that informed the analyses, but they each deserve another one.

    Baseball-Reference.com provided basic stats. FanGraphs offered more complex stats, most notably plate-discipline data that was referenced for both hitters and pitchers. Brooks Baseball afforded spray charts; zone profiles; and, most importantly, pitch data. Pitch types, velocity and movement data all came from there.

    Lastly, Baseball Prospectus produced additional data and was particularly handy in forming the health sections by way of its injury records. Rotoworld helped with more recent injury updates.

500-451: Doumit-Soriano

2 of 109

    Brad Rempel-USA TODAY Sports

    500. Ryan Doumit, DH, Minnesota Twins

    40/85

    This has been a subpar season for Doumit. He's gotten away from some of the things that made him a quality hitter in the past, and he has also seen his power take a sharp decline. But even with these trends taken into account, his bat isn't entirely useless. 

    499. Reed Johnson, OF, Atlanta Braves

    46/100

    Johnson is a guy who has defined the phrase “solid fourth outfielder” better than most for several years. He's not much of a hitter, but he's still a solid athlete and can play all three outfield spots pretty well.

    498. Seth Smith, DH, Oakland A's

    47/85

    This hasn’t been such a great year for Smith’s bat. Still, his power is better than he’s shown, and he’s a guy who can run the bases better than most DHs.

    497. Rickie Weeks, 2B, Milwaukee Brewers

    48/100

    An All-Star as recently as 2011, Weeks’ career has taken a drastic turn for the worse over the last two seasons as his hitting has become terribly inconsistent. He can still hit for power, and his athleticism hasn't gone away completely just yet.

    496. A.J. Jimenez, C, Toronto Blue Jays

    49/100

    Jimenez has always stood out for his defense, which is good enough to profile as a backup catcher, even if his bat doesn’t come around. However, as long as he can stay on the field, he has the potential to exceed expectations at the plate and play his way into an everyday role.

    495. Josh Johnson, SP, Toronto Blue Jays

    49/100

    Johnson's health failed him again, his command was all over the place, and his respectable strikeout rate didn’t save him from hard hit after hard hit. All the same, he still has good stuff and can eat innings when he’s healthy.

    494. Ryan Dempster, SP, Boston Red Sox

    49/100

    Dempster’s flat stuff didn’t play very well with Texas down the stretch in 2012, and it hasn’t played much better in Boston. The bright side is that he gets just enough strikeouts to avoid total irrelevance.

    493. Ross Detwiler, SP, Washington Nationals

    49/100

    Detwiler's 2013 season was derailed by a back injury. While he's a one-dimensional pitcher who doesn't miss a lot of bats or eat a lot of innings, he at least saves face with quality command.

    492. Wade Davis, SP, Kansas City Royals 

    50/100

    There’s no question that Davis' stuff plays better out of the bullpen, as his fastball loses a lot of zip and everything else loses its general crispness when he starts. His stuff is passable, and he also qualifies as a decent strikeout artist as a starter.

    491. Ian Kennedy, SP, San Diego Padres

    50/100

    Kennedy must find his command again, as he absolutely needs it in order to get by with mediocre stuff. But even on a bad day, he's still a guy who can eat innings.

    490. J.A. Happ, SP, Toronto Blue Jays

    50/100

    Happ has neither great stuff nor great command, and he’s been known to have problems with the long ball. He’s also managed to be a decent strikeout artist throughout his career, and he’ll hit the century mark with his pitch count when he takes the mound.

    489. Jason Hammel, SP, Baltimore Orioles

    50/100

    Hammel has lost some zip on his fastball this year, not to mention some crispness on his slider. These things have hurt him, and Hammel himself got hurt in July, ending up on the DL with flexor-mass tightness. He's not much more than an innings-eater.

    488. Jorge Soler, OF, Chicago Cubs

    50/100

    Even though Soler lacks stateside experience and suffered an unfortunate setback this season, he has the natural ability and tools to get to the major leagues in a hurry.

    487. Luke Scott, DH, Tampa Bay Rays

    50/85

    Scott has experienced a turnaround from his poor 2012 season in 2013, in part because he's fixed up his approach and in part because he's done better against lefties. But as far as DHs go, he's really not much more than a slightly above-average hitter.

    486. J.B. Shuck, OF, Los Angeles Angels

    50/100

    Nothing about Shuck is impressive. His bat, glove and baserunning all barely pass for major league caliber. But in the realm of fringy reserve outfielders, he’s been better than most in 2013 and looks like a guy who could stick.

    485. Jose Tabata, OF, Pittsburgh Pirates

    50/100

    Tabata has tended to stand out as one of the most inconsequential players in recent memory, but his bat has had some life breathed into it this year. Because of that, he's a bit beyond the reach of total irrelevance.

    484. Chris Heisey, OF, Cincinnati Reds

    50/100

    Heisey is a lousy hitter, but he has some power to offer and can play some solid D out in left field. These talents make him a good fit as a reserve outfielder.

    483. Melky Cabrera, LF, Toronto Blue Jays

    50/100

    Cabrera has gone from being a guy nobody could get out to being a cheat who now barely qualifies as one of the top outfielders in the game. He was playing in pain even when he was healthy in 2013, so don't give up on his bat just yet.

    482. Dayan Viciedo, LF, Chicago White Sox

    50/100

    Viciedo’s glove is a disaster, and his hitting really isn't much better. But there's power in his bat, and enough of it to potentially make him an above-average regular.

    481. Nick Castellanos, OF, Detroit Tigers

    50/100

    Castellanos has the opportunity to get his feet wet in the major leagues in September. If all goes as hoped, he could be looking at a partial or full-time role in the Tigers outfield next season. While he’s still a bit rough around the edges, his bat is ready to be challenged at the highest level.

    480. Conor Gillaspie, 3B, Chicago White Sox

    50/100

    There's not much that's particularly exciting about Gillaspie. He's not a good hitter, power hitter, baserunner or fielder. However, he's good enough at each of these things to get by.

    479. Michael Morse, OF, Baltimore Orioles

    50/100

    Morse’s hitting isn’t as hopeless as he’s made it look with his performance this year, and he certainly has the kind of power bat that’s going to keep him in the big leagues for a while longer. But he’s nothing if not inconsistent, and he's the kind of player who should be banned from playing the field.

    478. J.P. Howell, RP, Los Angeles Dodgers 

    50/85

    There's another southpaw in L.A.'s pen who is better than Howell, but J.P. is a guy who’s death on lefties and who can handle his own against righty hitters.

    477. Tanner Scheppers, RP, Texas Rangers

    50/85

    Scheppers definitely has the arm to be a standout reliever, and goodness knows that he’s shown flashes in 2013. But for now, his command is a bit too hit or miss, and he needs to work on missing more bats.

    476. Jake McGee, RP, Tampa Bay Rays

    50/85

    McGee hasn't followed through on his brilliant 2012 season in 2013, suffering from regressions in command and his ability to miss bats. But there’s no mistaking that he has a live arm, and any non-LOOGY lefty is a good guy to have in a bullpen.

    475. Jose Molina, C, Tampa Bay Rays

    50/100

    Molina can’t hit, hit for power or run, but every catcher in the big leagues could stand to learn a thing or two from him about playing the catcher position. If nothing else, they can take framing lessons from him.

    474. Kendrys Morales, DH, Seattle Mariners

    50/85

    Morales' quietly excellent 2009 season is a distant memory at this point, but he can still hit. His numbers will only go so high, though he can manage a .330-.340 OBP and a slugging percentage in the mid-.400s.

    473. Roy Halladay, SP, Philadelphia Phillies

    50/100

    The jury's still out on whether Halladay's old stuff will ever return to him. And while you don't want to bet against him, at the same time, it's awfully hard to have faith in the 36-year-old.

    472. Cody Allen, RP, Cleveland Indians

    51/85

    Allen’s command is iffy, and he has a thing or two to learn about pressure situations. However, he does have the right kind of fastball-curveball combination to be a shutdown reliever, as well as the ability to miss bats.

    471. Darren O'Day, RP, Baltimore Orioles

    51/85

    O’Day fits the mold of the gimmicky submariner relief pitcher, as he doesn't have great stuff and has to get by on smoke and mirrors. But there’s no denying that he’s death on right-handed batters and that he’s proven himself as a good guy to have in a pinch.

    470. Samuel Deduno, SP, Minnesota Twins

    51/100

    Deduno has one of the better sinking fastballs in the business, and he has pretty good command of it. Combine the two, and you get a legit ground-ball specialist. He's had arm problems in the past, however, and now his shoulder is messed up.

    469. Juan Nicasio, SP, Colorado Rockies

    51/100

    Nicasio isn't much of a workhorse, but he does have a solid fastball-slider mix, and he makes up for a relatively high walk rate and low strikeout rate by keeping the ball on the ground. He has an ugly ERA this year, but his actual performance hasn’t been that bad.

    468. Jacob Turner, SP, Miami Marlins

    51/100

    Turner’s command is a work in progress, and he should be racking up more whiffs and strikeouts with his stuff. Still, he has a solid arsenal of pitches to work with, and his ability to keep the ball on the ground has been good enough to allow him to get by.

    467. John Jaso, DH, Oakland A's

    51/85

    There’s no question that Jaso makes for a better DH than he does a catcher. He doesn't offer much power, but his talent for getting on base is commendable.

    466. Matt Davidson, 3B, Arizona Diamondbacks

    52/100

    Davidson will never wow anyone with his overall play, but he has the ability to be a decent hitter with above-average power. He could even make an All-Star team or two if he continues to improve on both sides of the ball.

    465. Freddy Galvis, 2B, Philadelphia Phillies

    52/100

    There's not much to speak of when it comes to Galvis' bat, but he's a terrific defender who's well cut out for a life as a slick-fielding second baseman.

    464. John Mayberry Jr., OF, Philadelphia Phillies

    52/100

    Mayberry’s the kind of player who’s hard to get excited about, but he has some power in his bat and a versatile glove that's useful when he plays right field.

    463. Logan Forsythe, 2B, San Diego Padres

    52/100

    Jedd Gyorko is the man at second base for the Padres, but Forsythe held his own as a regular down the stretch in 2012. He's got solid pop, can run the bases and can play defense decently enough.

    462. Andy Pettitte, SP, New York Yankees

    52/100

    It suddenly doesn't sound like a lock that 2013 will be Pettitte's last season in the bigs. Given the way he's pitched, he certainly has a good excuse to come back in 2014. His stuff is still flat, but he's had more velocity this year than he did in 2012. He also still commands the ball well.

    461. Bud Norris, SP, Baltimore Orioles

    52/100

    Norris fits the mold of a No. 5 starter about as well as any pitcher in the majors. He has decent velocity on his fastball and a pretty good slider, but that’s about all he has. His control is suspect, and he’s had problems with the long ball in the past.

    460. Jon Niese, SP, New York Mets

    52/100

    It’s hard to rave about Niese’s stuff, but the mediocre walk rate he has this year doesn’t reflect the kind of command he has. He does himself a favor by keeping batted balls on the ground better than 50 percent of the time. 

    459. Zach McAllister, SP, Cleveland Indians

    52/100

    McAllister throws a lot of fastballs, so it’s a good thing he can run his up to 93 and pitch up in the zone effectively enough to get by. While he struggles to get through six innings consistently, his workhorse ability would be worse off if he weren’t capable of topping the 100-pitch threshold with regularity.

    458. Dan Straily, SP, Oakland A's

    52/100

    Straily appeared on the radar last year by racking up strikeouts at an impressive rate in Triple-A, and that skill has translated fairly well to the big leagues, despite a lack of truly impressive stuff. Though only to a slight degree, he's also improved on the command he showed during his cup of coffee in 2012.

    457. Danny Duffy, SP, Kansas City Royals

    52/100

    Duffy hasn’t been back from Tommy John surgery for very long, and there are obviously still some question marks. But since he’s still a hard-throwing lefty with a good hook and changeup, Duffy should definitely be on everyone’s radar in 2014.

    456. Casey Fien, RP, Minnesota Twins

    52/85

    Fien’s a guy with a modest ERA and barely even a hint of a reputation as a shutdown reliever. But relievers who can throw strikes are always good to have, and Fien can do that and miss a few bats.

    455. Matt Belisle, RP, Colorado Rockies

    52/85

    Belisle's terrific command helps make up for his lack of overpowering stuff, and he's going to do the job more often than not. He has, however, seen his status as a shutdown reliever take a few hits over the last couple years.

    454. Alberto Callaspo, 3B, Oakland A's

    52/100

    Callaspo was more than just a viable regular a few years back, but his bat is subpar for the position, and his defense has taken a step back in 2013. The best thing that can be said is that he's better than he's shown, both at the plate and in the field.

    453. Trevor Plouffe, 3B, Minnesota Twins

    52/100

    Plouffe is far from a star-caliber player, as his bat and defense are just too inconsistent. He does, however, have some decent pop to offer.

    452. Brandon Kintzler, RP, Milwaukee Brewers

    52/85

    A nobody before 2013, Kintzler has put his sinker and command to good use in 2013, racking up tons of ground balls and proving himself as a guy who can handle tough innings.

    451. Rafael Soriano, RP, Washington Nationals

    52/85

    Soriano has a big contract and has topped 40 saves once again in 2013, but think twice before labeling him an elite reliever. He's still effective, but he's losing velocity, and his struggles to miss bats this season are a legit concern.

450-401: Young-Ogando

3 of 109

    Chris Humphreys-USA TODAY Sports

    450. Michael Young, 3B, Los Angeles Dodgers

    52/100

    Young is a disaster of a defender at third base, and his best days as a power hitter have long since passed. However, his bat isn't totally dead just yet. He can still hit.

    449. Lonnie Chisenhall, 3B, Cleveland Indians

    52/100

    It's still up in the air as to whether Chisenhall's bat is good enough for him to cut it as a regular, but he has some decent power at his disposal and isn't a value vacuum on the basepaths or in the field. 

    448. Adam Dunn, DH, Chicago White Sox

    52/85

    Whether or not Dunn will even be back in 2014 is up in the air. But seeing as how he’s still very much useful as a power specialist, there’s still a place for him in the MLB if he wants to stick around.

    447. Mike Olt, 3B, Chicago Cubs

    53/100

    Assuming he regains his feel at the plate and that the vision issue that plagued him earlier this season is a thing of the past, Olt should be able to post a .250 batting average with 25-plus home runs in his best seasons.

    446. Arismendy Alcantara, 2B, Chicago Cubs

    53/100

    Alcantara has always shown explosive tools on both sides of the ball, but his inability to stay healthy delayed the development of his secondary skills. After the strides he’s made this season in his first taste of the Double-A level—not to mention the impressive power-speed numbers—he could find himself a part of the Cubs infield by the middle of 2014.

    445. Carlos Correa, SS, Houston Astros

    53/100

    Correa is a physically blessed shortstop with the potential for five above-average or better tools at maturity. He’s still growing into his large but athletic frame and will likely endure some rough stretches along the way, but there’s no reason to believe that he won’t be a top-tier shortstop with legitimate MVP potential.

    444. Eric Young Jr., OF, New York Mets

    53/100

    Young is in the majors because of his speed. It's a good thing that he puts it to good use, and his bat packs just enough punch to make him a bit more than a mere pinch-running specialist.

    443. Kyle Blanks, OF, San Diego Padres

    53/100

    Blanks hasn’t put it all together yet, but he’s shown signs this season that he could do so in the near future to become regular with solid power. The trick will be for him to stay on the field.

    442. Lucas Duda, OF, New York Mets

    53/100

    Avert your eyes when Duda is playing the field, but his bat is not something to be underestimated, in light of what he was doing earlier in 2013. He's not much for batting average, but he can get on base and he has some legit pop.

    441. Jose Lobaton, C, Tampa Bay Rays

    53/100

    Lobaton has come alive in 2013 thanks in large part to an increased line-drive habit. There are more well-rounded catchers than him out there, but good hitting catchers are always welcome.

    440. Jaime Garcia, SP, St. Louis Cardinals

    53/100

    Garcia’s health is a huge question mark, as he has Tommy John in his history and more recently had to go in for surgery to repair a labrum tear after missing big chunk of time in 2012 with a bad shoulder. But he has a track record as a solid pitcher, with good command and a surprising ability to miss bats. 

    439. Chad Billingsley, SP, Los Angeles Dodgers

    53/100

    Billingsley isn’t going to be seen until later in 2014, as he’s going to be recovering from his April Tommy John operation for a while longer still. But don’t forget about him in the meantime, as he’s a pitcher with a deep repertoire and a solid strikeout ability.

    438. John Danks, SP, Chicago White Sox

    53/100

    Danks gets by on very good command of his pitches rather than stuff, and this year his efficiency has made him a solid bet to pitch into the seventh. One major drawback is that it’s easy to get the ball in the air off him, and he’s had all sorts of trouble with the ball going over the fence in 2013.

    437. Chris Capuano, SP, Los Angeles Dodgers

    53/100

    Capuano is a survivor of not one but two Tommy John operations, and his injury history has only grown larger this year. He also has underwhelming stuff, with a fastball that sits 89-90 and secondaries that aren’t liable to freeze hitters at the plate. But when he has his command, he gets by OK.

    436. Brendan Ryan, SS, New York Yankees

    53/100

    It's not much of a secret that Ryan's bat is about as useless as they come, but his defense is extremely good at a position where extremely good defense is very much of use. His glove alone is good for a couple wins per season (actual fact).

    435. Asdrubal Cabrera, SS, Cleveland Indians

    53/100

    In no time at all, Cabrera has gone from being an All-Star player to a guy who barely makes the cut as one of the league’s top shortstops. But since he still has some power to offer, he's not totally irrelevant just yet.

    434. Raul Ibanez, OF, Seattle Mariners

    53/100

    It’s up in the air as to whether Ibanez will even return for another season in 2014. But if he does, he’s made it pretty clear that he still has power to offer, even if it means having to live with an inconsistent bat and a terrible glove.

    433. Derek Jeter, SS, New York Yankees

    53/100

    If we're being honest, Jeter's 2013 season has been disastrous to the point that he shouldn't even be on this countdown. But we know from his track record that he can hit, and that track record is plenty long enough for the benefit of the doubt.

    432. Christian Bethancourt, C, Atlanta Braves

    54/100

    Bethancourt has the potential to impact the game in a variety of ways behind the plate and still has plenty of room for improvement. If he can come close to reaching his offensive ceiling, Bethancourt could emerge as one of the more well-rounded backstops in the game.

    431. Derek Dietrich, 2B, Miami Marlins

    54/100

    As much work as Dietrich needs both at the plate and in the field, he has the goods to be a power-hitting second baseman. A rare breed indeed.

    430. Junichi Tazawa, RP, Boston Red Sox

    54/85

    That Tazawa’s stuff has lost some electricity from 2012 to 2013 should not be overlooked, but he has some of the best command you’re going to find among relievers. It serves him well.

    429. Gaby Sanchez, 1B, Pittsburgh Pirates

    54/100

    Sanchez is a bit of a has-been as a former All-Star and contender for rookie of the year, but he's proven to be a halfway-decent platoon first baseman who has a good bat and a capable glove.

    428. Khris Davis, OF, Milwaukee Brewers

    54/100

    You should think twice before trusting the numbers that Davis has put up in his brief time in the majors, and exactly how he fits into Milwaukee’s plans is a question mark. But he’s made it clear that he can hit, and there should be some power in his bat, even after his HR/FB rate deflates.

    427. Rajai Davis, OF, Toronto Blue Jays

    54/100

    Davis’ game is based almost entirely around his speed. It’s a good thing that he has lots of that and knows how to put it to good use on the basepaths, even if it is wasted in the field.

    426. Yonder Alonso, 1B, San Diego Padres

    54/100

    Alonso’s power leaves a lot to be desired in light of the position he plays, but he gets on base enough and plays good-enough defense to earn his keep.

    425. Wandy Rodriguez, SP, Pittsburgh Pirates

    54/100

    Rodriguez's health is a red flag, but he was pitching just fine when he was healthy. His stuff was as mediocre as ever, but he was working with the lowest walk rate of his career, the result of him throwing more pitches in the zone than usual.

    424. Steve Delabar, RP, Toronto Blue Jays

    54/85

    Delabar is definitely on the map after making the American League All-Star team this year, as well he should be, with his ability to strike hitters out. It's too bad that his command is lacking and that he can be adventurous when it comes time to nail things down.

    423. Sean Doolittle, RP, Oakland A's

    54/85

    As a fastball-only reliever, Doolittle should by all rights be getting smacked around every time he takes the mound. Instead, he's been able to consistently overpower hitters since the moment he arrived and has staked his claim as one of the better lefty setup men in the business.

    422. Ubaldo Jimenez, SP, Cleveland Indians

    54/100

    Jimenez’s days as a guy who could sit in the high-90s with his hard stuff are long gone, but he still has good velocity for a starter, and his slider and splitter can still be nasty on a good day. His issues arise with his command, which can't be trusted.

    421. Nick Markakis, OF, Baltimore Orioles

    54/100

    Markakis has a reputation as a good, solid player, but this is shaping up to be easily his worst season in the major leagues. He can play the field and run the bases well enough, but his bat has been cold for most of the year.

    420. John Buck, C, Pittsburgh Pirates

    55/100

    Buck is not the star that he masqueraded as early in the 2013 season, but his bat has some pop in it, and he can still play passable defense behind the plate. 

    419. Marcus Stroman, SP, Toronto Blue Jays

    55/100

    Although Stroman’s long-term future as a starter is debatable, there’s no question that his stuff is good enough to compete in the major leagues. Given his success this season since returning from a 50-game suspension for performance-enhancing drugs, it’s seemingly only a matter of time until he gets a chance to prove it.

    418. Yordano Ventura, SP, Kansas City Royals

    55/100

    Ventura has taken a huge step forward this season in terms of both his consistency and command, and he's finally looking more like an actual pitcher than a guy who throws really, really hard. 

    417. Garin Cecchini, 3B, Boston Red Sox

    55/100

    Once he has a clear path to everyday playing time in the major leagues, Cecchini has the potential to be an annual .300-plus hitter with a high on-base percentage, 30-plus doubles and 15 to 25 stolen bases.

    416. Jeremy Guthrie, SP, Kansas City Royals

    55/100

    With mediocre stuff and a longstanding inability to miss bats, Guthrie is pretty well established as baseball’s foremost batting-practice pitcher. Living with him means living with hard-hit balls, a good percentage of which find their ways over the fence. At least he can eat innings.

    415. Joe Saunders, SP, Seattle Mariners

    55/100

    This has been the first season in a while in which Saunders has struggled to get through six on a consistent basis. It’s a good thing that he’s still better than most at eating innings, however, as you’re left with the following if you strip away Saunders’ ability to do so: average stuff and an extreme inability to miss bats.

    414. David Carpenter, RP, Atlanta Braves

    55/85

    Carpenter was a nobody in 2011 and 2012 in his time with the Astros and Blue Jays. Leave it to the Braves to turn a guy like that into an effective reliever.

    413. Brett Cecil, RP, Toronto Blue Jays

    55/100

    Cecil owes his respectable standing on this list largely to his deep repertoire, but he does deserve credit for establishing himself as one of baseball’s rarer commodities: a lefty who can be used against both left- and right-handed batters in pressure situations.

    412. Brad Ziegler, RP, Arizona Diamondbacks

    55/85

    Need a ground ball in a pinch? That’s a job Ziegler is more cut out for than any other reliever in the game, and 2013 has seen him morph into one of the most dependable relievers in the business.

    411. Ryan Ludwick, OF, Cincinnati Reds

    55/100

    Ludwick’s health has seen better days, and he's not a good place to look if you want a lesson on hitting, baserunning or defense. But hey, at least he has has power to offer.

    410. Jonny Gomes, OF, Boston Red Sox

    55/100

    Gomes offers two things: power and patience. While that's really all he's got, that's good enough in today's game.

    409. Kelly Johnson, OF, Tampa Bay Rays

    55/100

    Johnson looked like a lost cause as a full-time second baseman in Toronto last season, but leave it to the Rays to take him and make a productive player out of him again. His bat's best days have long since passed, but he still has some pop.

    408. Joel Peralta, RP, Tampa Bay Rays

    55/85

    This has been a trying season for Peralta, as he hasn't missed as many bats as he did in 2012 and has seen his command suffer to boot. But he still boasts quality stuff, and he's still been capable of doing more good than harm in high-leverage situations.

    407. Brett Wallace, 1B, Houston Astros

    55/100

    Whatever hope Wallace had of becoming a star player seems to have passed him by, but it bodes well for him that he's at least unlocked some legit power in 2013.

    406. David Freese, 3B, St. Louis Cardinals

    55/100

    Freese was one of the league's better third basemen in 2012. He's been one of the worst in 2013, especially on the defensive side of the ball. It's a good thing that he's still a better-than-league-average hitter.

    405. Neal Cotts, RP, Texas Rangers

    55/85

    Cotts’ remarkable return does have a “too good to be true” vibe to it, but the stuff he’s been getting hitters out with is legit. Thanks to that, he's done a good job of missing bats against both righties and lefties and has reestablished himself as an effective setup man.

    404. Jim Johnson, RP, Baltimore Orioles

    55/85

    It’s been a down year for Johnson, one that definitely suggests that his 2012 season was largely a product of good luck. However, he still has the command and the quality repertoire to make the grade as one of baseball’s better relievers.

    403. Alex Wood, SP, Atlanta Braves

    55/100

    Wood's stuff isn't eye-popping, but that funky delivery of his has proven to be effective at making his stuff hard to pick up. He's pretty good at missing bats, and he also keeps the ball on the ground well. 

    402. Jason Vargas, SP, Los Angeles Angels

    55/100

    With the exception of his changeup, there’s nothing impressive about what Vargas throws. He’s also tended to be a home run magnet in his career, notably giving up a whopping 35 long balls in 2012. But his command allows him to be efficient and eat innings.

    401. Alexi Ogando, SP, Texas Rangers

    55/100

    Ogando’s arm is a live one, as he can run his fastball between 93-94 with a good slider, and the 2013 season has seen him go to his changeup more often. He also has better command than he’s shown this year. Really, the biggest complaint to be made about him is over his health, which has been an issue in 2013.

400-351: Frieri-Ross

4 of 109

    Jayne Kamin-Oncea-USA TODAY Spor

    400. Ernesto Frieri, RP, Los Angeles Angels

    55/85

    Frieri is the kind of closer who is going to make things interesting due to his poor control, and it’s clear that he needs an off-speed pitch to keep hitters honest. These things being said, his fastball should be cloned and distributed across the land.

    399. Wily Peralta, SP, Milwaukee Brewers

    55/100

    Peralta has a live arm and a good fastball-slider combination, and he gets credit for keeping his hard stuff around the bottom of the zone. However, his command isn't particularly good, and he doesn't miss as many bats as he should. 

    398. Yovani Gallardo, SP, Milwaukee Brewers

    55/100

    Gallardo’s stuff is fading fast, as he’s gone from sitting 93-94 with his hard stuff to barely getting by at 91-92, and his breaking stuff has lost some effectiveness, too. The good news is that his command and ability to miss bats have been a lot better since he returned from the disabled list in mid-August.

    397. Mike Moustakas, 3B, Kansas City Royals

    55/100

    It's not a question of talent with Moustakas; it's a question of his making adjustments. He's shown some hope in that regard since the All-Star break, but his bat still has a ways to go before it's consistent, and there's also a question mark that concerns his power potential.

    396. Ryan Howard, 1B, Philadelphia Phillies

    55/100

    Chalk 2013 up as yet another injury-shortened season for Howard, and it wasn't going so well when he was healthy. He still has some legit pop, but his bat has gotten to be wildly inconsistent. 

    395. Eric Stults, SP, San Diego Padres

    55/100

    Stults is basically Mark Buehrle with a little extra velocity. But he does have good command of his stuff, and his efficiency comes in handy in terms of helping him eat innings.

    394. Jorge de la Rosa, SP, Colorado Rockies

    55/100

    De la Rosa is admittedly having a much better season in 2013 than this ranking indicates. The reasons he isn't higher are as follows: He has good-but-not-great stuff, his command is just OK, he doesn’t overpower hitters, and he can't be counted on for six innings or 100 pitches when he takes the ball. 

    393. Jeff Locke, SP, Pittsburgh Pirates

    55/100

    Locke doesn’t have overpowering velocity, but his four-seam fastball has some serious tailing action on it, and he also has a quality changeup and curveball. That's the good. Now here's the bad: Locke doesn’t throw strikes, he doesn’t miss bats, and he’s not even averaging six innings per start.

    392. Matt Harrison, SP, Texas Rangers

    56/100

    This was a lost season for Harrison due to a series of back injuries that he hasn’t been able to overcome, eventually culminating in his being shut down for good in mid-August. When healthy in 2012, however, Harrison earned himself a nice new contract by being a good command artist who could keep the ball on the ground and rack up innings.

    391. Billy Hamilton, CF, Cincinnati Reds

    56/100

    At worst, Hamilton profiles as a high-level fourth outfielder and a pinch runner. If he develops as hoped, however, Hamilton has the potential be one of baseball’s premier top-of-the-order players up the middle.

    390. Roberto Hernandez, SP, Tampa Bay Rays

    56/100

    Hernandez’s sinker isn't what it used to be, but it's still a quality pitch that he commands well, and it keeps the ball on the ground more often than not. It's too bad he can't keep the ball in the yard.

    389. Matt Tuiasosopo, OF, Detroit Tigers

    56/100

    Tuiasosopo surely isn’t as good a hitter as his numbers say he is, but he’s definitely made improvements that have helped him become a capable hitter. He can get on base and also boasts solid power.

    388. Luis Valbuena, 3B, Chicago Cubs

    56/100

    It’s hard to get excited about guys like Valbuena, but his ability to get on base and his ability to play solid D at the hot corner must be appreciated.

    387. Austin Hedges, C, San Diego Padres

    56/100

    Hedges' elite, game-changing chops behind the plate will make him one of the best defensive catchers in the major leagues upon his arrival. If the bat continues to develop ahead of schedule, Hedges has the potential to reach his enormous ceiling as one of the game’s premier catchers.

    386. Nathan Eovaldi, SP, Miami Marlins

    56/100

    Eovaldi is still a pup as a starter, and his arm and shoulder have already had it pretty rough over the years. But goodness knows he has a live arm with a nasty fastball-slider combination, and his command this season hasn’t been as mediocre as his walk rate indicates.

    385. Dillon Gee, SP, New York Mets

    56/100

    Gee helps make up for having mediocre stuff by having a lot of it, as he has five pitches that he features regularly and varies up his fastball duty between a four-seamer and sinker. He also makes it harder than it should be to square his stuff up, which is all thanks to his easily above-average command. It's too bad he has a scary injury history.

    384. Tommy Milone, SP, Oakland A's

    56/100

    Milone’s stuff is about as “meh” as it gets, with the only pitch capable of raising your eyebrows being his changeup. But he has very good command of his arsenal, and that allows him to eat a solid number of innings.

    383. Justin Morneau, 1B, Pittsburgh Pirates

    56/100

    Morneau is far from the player he used to be, and his health should be trusted only as far as it can be thrown. However, his bat isn't dead just yet, and his power has experienced a welcome revival in the second half of the season.

    382. Drew Smyly, RP, Detroit Tigers

    56/85

    He hasn't been an ace in high-leverage situations in 2013, but Smyly has shown that he has the stuff, the command and the ability to miss bats to be a capable lefty reliever.

    381. Paco Rodriguez, RP, Los Angeles Dodgers

    56/85

    He’s far from a household name, and he doesn't boast overpowering stuff, but Rodriguez is a surprisingly hard guy for batters to square up and has proven to be an effective setup man in 2013.

    380. Josh Collmenter, RP, Arizona Diamondbacks

    56/85

    Collmenter’s not the kind of guy who’s going to come out of the bullpen and blow hitters away, but he has the right mix to get hitters out, and his ability to go multiple innings at a time makes him all the more valuable.

    379. Scooter Gennett, 2B, Milwaukee Brewers

    56/100

    Exactly how Gennett fits into Milwaukee's plans with Rickie Weeks still under contract through 2014 is a dilemma, but he's made it clear in his short time in the majors that his bat has some potential and that he can play passable D.

    378. Matt Dominguez, 3B, Houston Astros

    56/100

    There’s a lot of potential in Dominguez’s glove, but the key for him is becoming more consistent at the plate. If he's able to handle that, he's going to be a power-hitting, slick-fielding third baseman.

    377. Nate Jones, RP, Chicago White Sox

    56/85

    Jones can light up the radar gun with the best of them, and he's getting better at missing bats and keeping the ball on the ground. The catches are that his command needs some work and that he's also struggling to prove himself as an effective setup man.

    376. Henderson Alvarez, SP, Miami Marlins

    56/100

    It’s basically all sinkers when Alvarez is on the mound, but he has made more use of his four-seamer this year and has been rewarded in the form of the two things he desperately needed last year: more whiffs and more strikeouts. It's a shame that he hasn't been healthy for all of 2013 and that he's not much of a workhorse.

    375. Fernando Rodney, RP, Tampa Bay Rays

    56/85

    Rodney’s stuff is still outstanding, and he's been better ever since his early-season struggles. However, his command is a serious shortcoming, and he doesn't miss as many bats as he should.

    374. Scott Kazmir, SP, Cleveland Indians

    56/100

    Kazmir has turned the clock back on his stuff in 2013, and he’s displayed a much better idea of where it’s going than he did when he was last in the majors, in 2011. His ability to eat innings is still very much limited, however, and the DL stint he needed earlier in the season served as a reminder that his health can't be counted on.

    373. Norichika Aoki, RF, Milwaukee Brewers

    56/100

    Aoki is the best in the league at putting the bat on the ball, and he has a terrific arm that fits well in right field. It's too bad that he doesn't have the power for the position and that he's also a mediocre baserunner.

    372. Andy Dirks, OF, Detroit Tigers

    56/100

    He doesn’t always make the game look pretty, but Dirks is the kind of dirt-dog player every team should have. He's a decent hitter who can make things happen out in the field.

    371. Felix Doubront, SP, Boston Red Sox

    56/100

    Doubront is a decent source of strikeouts and ground balls, but his command is still hit or miss, and this season has seen him feature flatter stuff than what he had in 2012. He's not bad for a lefty starter, but he's probably closer to a back-end guy than a mid-rotation guy.

    370. A.J. Griffin, SP, Oakland A's

    56/100

    The only good pitch Griffin has at his disposal is a big, loopy curveball that occasionally jellies a few legs, but his game is more about hitting spots and changing speeds. He’s able to maintain about an average strikeout rate that makes life a little easier, but he’s also a home run magnet.

    369. Phil Hughes, SP, New York Yankees

    56/100

    Hughes' arsenal needs more than just his fastball and breaking ball, and he can still be touched up for home runs easily enough. But in his defense, Yankee Stadium does him no favors. His fly-ball style would play well just about anywhere else.

    368. Brandon Morrow, SP, Toronto Blue Jays

    56/100

    Morrow’s injury track record is now even more distressing than it already was, and it’s all a damn shame. His fastball-slider-splitter combination is deadly when he has it working, and he’s showed much-improved command of his stuff when he's been able to pitch the last two years. 

    367. Tony Cingrani, SP, Cincinnati Reds

    56/100

    Cingrani’s fastball is terrific enough to rack up swings and misses all on its own, and as such it has proven to be an effective weapon for him as a starter. But he could stand to expand his repertoire and harness some command, and the back problems he's experienced are a red flag.

    366. Brandon Beachy, SP, Atlanta Braves

    56/100

    Beachy's elbow didn't respond well to his return to action, but he continued to show off the kind of control he had in 2012 and at times flashed some of his old electric stuff. He's a candidate for a rebound season in 2014.

    365. Victor Martinez, DH, Detroit Tigers

    56/85

    More power would be nice, and it’s a good idea to avert your eyes when Martinez is running the bases. But after a very slow start to his season, he’s done nothing but make it clear that he can still hit with the best of 'em.

    364. Byron Buxton, CF, Minnesota Twins

    57/100

    With potential plus tools to his name, it’s obvious why Buxton is regarded as baseball’s consensus No. 1 prospect. Beyond his eye-popping natural ability, the outfielder possesses secondary skills that are uncommon in a player his age.

    363. Corey Hart, 1B, Milwaukee Brewers

    57/100

    Hart hasn't played in 2013 as he's recovered from various injuries, so he naturally didn't make out so well in the health portion of this project. But fully healthy, he offers a solid approach at the plate and some power to go with it.

    362. Sean Marshall, RP, Cincinnati Reds

    57/85

    There are better relievers in high-leverage situations than Marshall, and there are certainly relievers who come with fewer health concerns. But any lefty with two nasty breaking balls, good command and an ability to miss bats is a lefty who'd be a welcome addition to any bullpen.

    361. Yasmani Grandal, C, San Diego Padres

    57/100

    Grandal’s career has had nothing but bad things happen to it since the end of his promising rookie season, as he was first busted by the PED police and then busted in a major way by the injury bug. But he has a better bat than most catchers and is a good receiver behind the dish.

    360. Cliff Pennington, SS, Arizona Diamondbacks

    57/100

    Pennington can't hit much, but he's one of the best defenders in the business at shortstop. Because it's a premium defensive position, that's worth something.

    359. Trevor Cahill, SP, Arizona Diamondbacks

    57/100

    Cahill is one of the game’s preeminent sinkerballers, throwing his sinker over half the time and using it to consistently rack up high ground-ball rates. He’s prone to inconsistency, however, and that's been the case this season. 

    358. Paul Maholm, SP, Atlanta Braves

    57/100

    The depth of Maholm’s repertoire is good enough to make up for the relative mediocrity of his pitches, and he has the control to make these mediocre pitches effective. But he can be hit hard when the smoke and mirrors aren’t working, and he’s the kind of innings eater who’s really only good for six innings.

    357. Ryan Vogelsong, SP, San Francisco Giants

    57/100

    Vogelsong’s repertoire runs deep, as he’s featured a four-seamer, two-seamer, cutter, curveball and changeup all at least 10 percent of the time in 2013. But while his command can be impeccable when he’s on, he’s generally not much for pounding the zone, is only about average at limiting walks and isn't particularly good at missing bats.

    356. Jordy Mercer, SS, Pittsburgh Pirates

    57/100

    Mercer isn't the best defensive shortstop you're going to come across, but he has a good bat for the position, which qualifies him as an above-average regular.

    355. Darwin Barney, 2B, Chicago Cubs

    57/100

    Barney can’t hit, but anybody looking for a sure thing on defense at second base is required to at least glance in his direction.

    354. Drew Stubbs, OF, Cleveland Indians

    57/100

    You never know what you’re going to get when Stubbs is at the plate, but his bat has recovered a bit from his disastrous 2012 season. He also offers speed and solid defense in right field.

    353. Ryan Hanigan, C, Cincinnati Reds

    57/100

    Hanigan’s lousy season at the plate can’t be ignored, but he’s still earning his keep with his work behind the plate. He's one of the best in the business on defense at a position where defense is more important than it is anywhere else.

    352. Alex Avila, C, Detroit Tigers

    57/100

    Avila’s career has taken a downturn since his All-Star season in 2011, and there have been times throughout 2013 when he’s been hard to watch. But he’s a quality hitter for a catcher and has been busy proving as much in the second half when he's been able to get in the lineup.

    351. Cody Ross, OF, Arizona Diamondbacks

    57/100

    The move away from Fenway Park wasn't the best move for Ross’ power. However, his bat is decent, and he has a good glove that's versatile to boot. His low standing in these rankings has a lot to do with his hip injury.

350-301: Denorfia-Haren

5 of 109

    Ezra Shaw/Getty Images

    350. Chris Denorfia, OF, San Diego Padres

    57/100

    Denorfia's bat is nothing special, as he's not particularly good at getting on base or hitting for power. But he can run the bases and is useful in the outfield.

    349. Miguel Gonzalez, SP, Baltimore Orioles

    57/100

    Gonzalez is mainly a fastball-splitter pitcher with basically average control and not much ability to gather whiffs and strikeouts. He also doesn’t keep the ball on the ground very well, which helps contribute to a minor home run problem. Yet he gets by OK and is capable of eating a solid number of innings to boot.

    348. Josh Hamilton, OF, Los Angeles Angels

    57/100

    Yup, it's come to this for Josh Hamilton. His approach at the plate has been just as frustrating in 2013 as it was down the stretch in 2012, and he's also lost some power. He's not the superstar player he's being paid to be.

    347. David Lough, OF, Kansas City Royals

    57/100

    Maybe it’s a bit too soon to call Lough a late bloomer, but he’s given the Royals a boost with a decent bat and quality defense in right and left fields. He's been one of the more unsung heroes of the AL Central in 2013.

    346. Michael Wacha, SP, St. Louis Cardinals

    57/100

    Wacha works in the 91-93 range with his fastball when starting, and his changeup has the look of a plus offering. He’s also shown some solid command and has missed some bats, though not as many as a starter compared to as a reliever. In short, the early returns on him are encouraging.

    345. Joe Kelly, SP, St. Louis Cardinals

    57/100

    Kelly can run his hard stuff up into the mid-90s, and his arsenal also includes a changeup, slider and curveball that are all solid. He’s overachieved a little bit as a starter, but the goods are definitely there.

    344. Jarred Cosart, SP, Houston Astros

    58/100

    Cosart has been one of the more frustrating pitchers in the minor leagues for the last several years—well, at least until he was called up for the first time by the Astros in mid-July. He hasn’t missed as many bats in the majors as he did in Triple-A, but that hasn’t stopped the right-hander from emerging as the team’s most consistent starter since the All-Star break.

    343. Jameson Taillon, SP, Pittsburgh Pirates

    58/100

    Regarded as one of the game’s top pitching prospects since the 2011 season, it shouldn’t be long until Taillon joins Gerrit Cole, the team’s former top prospect, in the major leagues. The right-hander is one of a select few pitching prospects with two potential plus-plus offerings (fastball/curveball), though his arm action leads to questions about his future command.

    342. Sonny Gray, SP, Oakland A's

    58/100

    Gray regressed across the board in 2012—his first full season in the minor leagues—but showed the ability to make adjustments and learn from the experience. The right-hander hasn’t skipped a beat despite pitching on the national stage and is making a strong case for a spot in the team’s 2014 rotation.

    341. Javier Baez, SS, Chicago Cubs

    58/100

    Although he’s rough around the edges, Baez has the potential to post multiple 20-20 seasons in his prime and appear in multiple All-Star games as a result.

    340. Ryan Flaherty, 2B, Baltimore Orioles

    58/100

    Brian Roberts is the guy with the reputation in Baltimore, but Flaherty has power that helps make up for his lousy hitting. He also offers underappreciated defense at second base.

    339. David DeJesus, CF, Tampa Bay Rays

    58/100

    DeJesus has never been a great player, and he’s not about to become one at his age. But he’s a veteran who can get on base and still hold his own running the bases and playing defense.

    338. Nick Franklin, 2B, Seattle Mariners

    58/100

    Franklin has experienced some growing pains ever since the start of August, but he has the goods to be a second baseman who can hit for power while holding his own defensively.

    337. Kelvin Herrera, RP, Kansas City Royals

    58/85

    Herrera’s numbers don’t look like those of a top-tier reliever, but 2013 has been a tale of two seasons for him. The first was a season in which he was lost in every way possible. The second has seen him recapture the promise of his 2012 season, in which he was a top-15 or maybe even top-10 reliever.

    336. Jesse Crain, RP, Tampa Bay Rays

    58/85

    Crain’s health is about as iffy as it gets, but he was in the middle of a terrific season before the injury bug who took a bite out of him. There was some overachieving going on, but he's a guy with good stuff, good command and a good ability to miss bats.

    335. Grant Balfour, RP, Oakland A's

    58/85

    With non-elite stuff, spotty command and a relatively modest ability to miss bats, Balfour shouldn’t be enjoying so much success. That he's experienced some regression in the second half is indeed a warning sign. But whether it's the rage or something else, he's a guy who gets the job done.

    334. Tyler Clippard, RP, Washington Nationals

    58/85

    Clippard’s magnificent 2011 season looks like an outlier. But armed with his rising fastball and killer changeup, he still has the goods to miss a fair amount of bats, and this season has seen him regain his status as a dominant setup man.

    333. Starlin Castro, SS, Chicago Cubs

    58/100

    Castro should be one of the best players in the National League with the talent he has but has instead been one of the worst in 2013. The only thing keeping him on the radar is his talent, as he should be a shortstop who can hit, hit for power, run the bases and play solid D.

    332. Jimmy Rollins, SS, Philadelphia Phillies

    58/100

    Rollins’ bat has gone missing in 2013, but we're banking on the notion that he still has some power somewhere inside him to go with his solid baserunning and defensive abilities.

    331. Rex Brothers, RP, Colorado Rockies

    58/85

    Brothers’ velocity loss and lack of control are concerning, but he misses bats, does a good job of keeping the ball on the ground and is a lefty reliever who can hold his own against righties. Also, he's been a very sure thing when he's entered games in 2013.

    330. Nick Hundley, C, San Diego Padres

    58/100

    Hundley hasn’t gotten back to being the force he was in 2011, when he had an .824 OPS while playing very strong defense. It's a good thing that he can still hit for some power and handle himself behind the dish.

    329. Jose Altuve, 2B, Houston Astros

    58/100

    Altuve earned an All-Star nod in 2012 on the strength of a near-.300 batting average. That was a tease, as his bat is below average for the position and in general. His best ability is running the bases, which is something he does very well.

    328. Brad Miller, SS, Seattle Mariners

    58/100

    Miller hasn’t been in the majors for long, but he rose fast through the minors, and it looks like he can cut it as a solid hitter at the MLB level. It's possible we haven't seen the best of his power.

    327. Randall Delgado, SP, Arizona Diamondbacks

    58/100

    Delgado has shown much better command than what he had in a disappointing stint with the Braves in 2012. He also has some good raw stuff that should eventually translate to him missing more bats. But for now he’s basically a two-pitch pitcher with a sinker and a changeup, and he's been better at giving up homers than he has been at missing bats.

    326. Jeremy Hellickson, SP, Tampa Bay Rays

    58/100

    Hellickson’s command has been better this year than it was in 2011 or 2012, paying off in the form of a much-improved walk rate. He’s also picked up a few more strikeouts, helping himself by leaving fewer things to chance. However, his changeup-happy approach has come under fire this year.

    325. Tyler Chatwood, SP, Colorado Rockies

    58/100

    Chatwood has some serious stuff at his disposal, and he has some solid command to go with it. His M.O. is to put Colorado’s strong defensive infield to work by generating tons of ground balls. The catch is that he doesn't eat innings.

    324. Matt Adams, 1B, St. Louis Cardinals

    58/100

    Adams isn't an asset defensively at first base, but he has a solid bat and more than solid power. It also reflects well on him that he hasn't had much trouble showing off his power against southpaws.

    323. Alejandro De Aza, CF, Chicago White Sox

    58/100

    De Aza has tools, but 2013 has been a rough year for his bat and an even rougher year for his glove. He's not a bad player, but he's spent the past season removing himself from the ranks of MLB's top center fielders.

    322. Eric Chavez, 3B, Arizona Diamondbacks

    58/100

    Chavez is too old to be a defensive gem, and injuries come with the territory. But his bat is still useful against right-handers, and there's still quite a bit of power to be found in it.

    321. David Murphy, LF, Texas Rangers

    58/100

    This has been a rough season for Murphy at the plate, but he's better than he's shown offensively. Also, don't overlook his defense in left field. He's one of the best in the business out there.

    320. Travis d'Arnaud, C, New York Mets

    58/100

    After enduring so many significant injuries before even reaching the major leagues, health will be a serious concern for d’Arnaud for the duration of his career. However, despite the checkered medical history, he still has the all-around ability and potential to be an All-Star several times over.

    319. Kyle Kendrick, SP, Philadelphia Phillies

    58/100

    Kendrick goes heavy on the sinkers and cutters, using good command of these pitches to try to pitch to contact. He gets plenty of ground balls but could certainly benefit from looking to miss a few more bats.

    318. Scott Feldman, SP, Baltimore Orioles

    58/100

    The best thing Feldman has going for him is his command, and he's done a good job of using that and what stuff he has to rack up ground balls in 2013. But when it comes down to it, he's not much more than an innings eater.

    317. Dylan Bundy, SP, Baltimore Orioles

    59/100

    After climbing from Low-A to the major leagues last year, Bundy was expected to spend a majority of the 2013 season in the Orioles’ starting rotation. However, the right-hander battled elbow soreness out of the gate this spring before eventually having Tommy John surgery in late June. I’m curious to see how he looks next year with a brand-spanking-new elbow.

    316. Kevin Gausman, SP, Baltimore Orioles

    59/100

    Gausman possesses an ideal combination of size, stamina and arm strength—the kind that you want in a frontline starting pitcher. He’s capable of being effective with only a plus-plus fastball-changeup combination. However, Gausman’s breaking ball and overall command will need to improve before he’s offered another crack at the Orioles’ starting rotation.

    315. Brett Anderson, SP, Oakland A's

    59/100

    Anderson’s career has basically been on the rocks since 2010 due to injuries, and that’s the damndest of shames. He has some good stuff, with a fastball that sits 92-93 and two sharp breaking balls, and he’s a terrific command artist when he’s healthy. 

    314. Danny Espinosa, 2B, Washington Nationals

    59/100

    This is going to go into the books as a lost season for Espinosa, as he started the year off hurt and then ended up in the minors. But when he's right, he offers power, speed and good defense at second base.

    313. Jackie Bradley Jr., CF, Boston Red Sox

    59/100

    Bradley will never wow with his tools, but he’s a consistent, well-rounded player who projects as an above-average center fielder with a hit tool and on-base skills that profile ideally at the top of a lineup. 

    312. Dioner Navarro, C, Chicago Cubs

    59/100

    Navarro was about as irrelevant as can be for a while there, but suddenly he’s a power hitter who must be reckoned with. Power is about all he has, but he has enough of it to earn his keep.

    311. DJ LeMahieu, 2B, Colorado Rockies

    59/100

    LeMahieu doesn't have much of a bat, but he plays terrific defense at second base and can add some value on the basepaths.

    310. Jonathan Papelbon, RP, Philadelphia Phillies

    59/85

    Papelbon is declining, and he’s not going to turn things around unless he finds a way to regain some of his old velocity and general explosiveness. But he still has at least decent stuff, and he still has very good command of it. This combination serves him well.

    309. Tommy Hunter, RP, Baltimore Orioles

    59/85

    Hunter should be better at missing bats with so much velocity at his disposal, but he has excellent command, and his ability to collect more than three outs when he appears is very much appreciated.

    308. Luke Hochevar, RP, Kansas City Royals

    59/85

    The Royals presumably weren’t counting on Hochevar merely becoming an effective reliever when they drafted him first overall in 2006, but oh well. He has the stuff and the command for relief work and could prove to be darn good in high-leverage situations if given the chance.

    307. Christian Yelich, OF, Miami Marlins

    59/100

    Yelich quickly emerged as a main cog in the Marlins offense following a midseason promotion directly from Double-A and, more importantly, proved that he belongs in the major leagues. While his on-base skills are valuable at the top of the lineup, Yelich’s ability to drive in runs could also make him a middle-of-the-order threat.  

    306. Casey Janssen, RP, Toronto Blue Jays

    59/85

    Janssen’s not the kind of closer who’s going to blow anybody away, but he has a deep repertoire at his disposal, as well as solid command and a decent ability to limit hits. Best of all, he's only getting better at handling high-leverage situations.

    305. Oscar Taveras, OF, St. Louis Cardinals

    59/100

    Taveras is a special hitter. Provided that he’s healthy next season, he’s a safe bet to rake upon reaching the major leagues and could potentially run away with the National League Rookie of the Year Award. 

    304. Mike Carp, 1B, Boston Red Sox

    59/100

    Carp has been one of the best platoon players in baseball in 2013, and that's no surprise given his solid approach at the plate and considerable power.

    303. Darin Ruf, 1B, Philadelphia Phillies

    59/100

    Ruf doesn't have the most refined approach at the plate, as he strikes out too much and doesn't have BABIP-friendly hitting habits. But he's able to get on base via the walk, and he also offers legit power.

    302. Garrett Jones, 1B, Pittsburgh Pirates

    59/100

    Jones may have peaked with his performance in 2012, but he's not as mediocre as he's shown in 2013 either. A little more luck and a little more power will mean better times in 2014.

    301. Dan Haren, SP, Washington Nationals

    59/100

    Haren likely isn't going to rediscover his old stuff any time soon, but he still has terrific control, and he just plain knows how to pitch. It's worth noting that he's had a decent second half.

300-251: Cashner-Mujica

6 of 109

    300. Andrew Cashner, SP, San Diego Padres

    59/100

    Cashner is still developing as a pitcher, but the signs are good. He certainly has a live arm and has shown off solid command and an ability to get ground balls. He's going to be dangerous if he starts missing bats as often as he should.

    299. Billy Butler, DH, Kansas City Royals

    59/85

    It’s a shame that Butler hasn’t been able to maintain the power he found in 2012, as it's obviously preferable to have a DH who can hit the ball a mile. However, Butler's still one of the best hitters at any position, not just DH.

    298. Bobby Parnell, RP, New York Mets

    60/85

    There are more reliable relievers than Parnell out there, but he has an electric fastball-curveball combination, and he knows how to command it. That's good enough.

    297. Emilio Bonifacio, 2B, Kansas City Royals

    60/100

    This hasn’t been an easy season for Bonifacio, but the player he's been with the Royals is a much truer representative of his real self than the player he was with the Blue Jays. He's a guy who can get on base and do damage with his wheels, and he's a quality defender at second base.

    296. Chris Carter, 1B, Houston Astros

    60/100

    It can be painful to watch Carter try to hit. But he's a guy who can hit the ball a mile, and he has value as a major leaguer because of that.

    295. Jonathan Singleton, 1B, Houston Astros

    60/100

    As a first-base-only prospect, Singleton’s bat will have to carry him to the major leagues. Luckily, he has a good one that should have him hitting in the middle of the Astros order for years to come.

    294. Kolten Wong, 2B, St. Louis Cardinals

    60/100

    Simply put, Wong is a ballplayer. He doesn’t have flashy tools, but he is capable of doing it all on the field. He projects as a slightly above-average second baseman on a first-division team.

    293. Adam Eaton, CF, Arizona Diamondbacks

    60/100

    Eaton hasn't turned his tools into outstanding production just yet, but the tools are definitely there. He has speed that plays on both the basepaths and in the outfield, and his bat also has some solid potential.

    292. Marcell Ozuna, CF, Miami Marlins

    60/100

    Ozuna isn’t fully formed yet, but his tools are impressive, and he did enough to show that he’s ready to put them to use at the MLB level. He could be a good one very soon if he puts it all together.

    291. Ryan Cook, RP, Oakland A's

    60/85

    This season hasn’t been the cakewalk that 2012 was for Cook, when he was one of the best relievers nobody was talking about. But he has good stuff and good command for a relief pitcher, and he’s still been one of the game’s top setup men even despite his issues.

    290. Gordon Beckham, 2B, Chicago White Sox

    60/100

    Beckham’s ceiling is pretty low due to his subpar power, but he's been a decent-enough hitter in 2013. He also offers solid defense, particularly when it comes to turning double plays.

    289. Eric Sogard, 2B, Oakland A's

    60/100

    Sogard doesn't have much power, but he's been a capable hitter in 2013. He also more than holds his own defensively at second base.

    288. Sergio Romo, RP, San Francisco Giants

    60/85

    It’s a concern that Romo isn’t getting as many whiffs all of a sudden, and another concern is that he’s been beatable in his first full season as a closer. All the same, his slider and control are still valuable commodities, and he's still a highly effective reliever.

    287. Derek Norris, C, Oakland A's

    60/100

    Norris gets on base better than the bulk of the league’s catching corps, and he also hits for some pop and runs the bases. The combination of these things helps make him a decent player, if not a particularly good one.

    286. Nate Schierholtz, OF, Chicago Cubs

    60/100

    The jury’s still out on whether Schierholtz can be an everyday outfielder, but he’s proven himself to be a highly effective platoon player in 2013. That's what good power and a good glove can do for you.

    285. Matt Joyce, OF, Tampa Bay Rays

    60/100

    He’s only a platoon outfielder, but you have to hand it to Joyce for excelling at the role he’s been given. He can hit for power and provide solid defense in both left and right fields.

    284. Junior Lake, CF, Chicago Cubs

    60/100

    Lake is still raw as an outfielder, and his approach at the plate could definitely use some fine tuning. But there's no denying that the tools are there, and those alone have put him on the radar as a potential power/speed star.

    283. Dan Uggla, 2B, Atlanta Braves

    60/100

    Uggla’s power is still his calling card. Thank goodness for that, because he's a lousy fielder at second base, and the only thing he does well at the plate besides hit homers is draw walks.

    282. Logan Morrison, 1B, Miami Marlins

    60/100

    The numbers LoMo has racked up in 2013 don't jump off the page, but he's a hitter who can get on base, and he deserves to have better power numbers. Marlins Park does him no favors.

    281. Michael Brantley, OF, Cleveland Indians

    60/100

    Brantley hasn’t had the same kind of impact in 2013 that he had in 2012, but his game hasn’t tailed off completely. He’s still a quality hitter, and he’s putting his speed to good use on the basepaths and in the field.

    280. Michael Saunders, CF, Seattle Mariners

    60/100

    Saunders doesn't have the legs to play center field well, nor are his legs useful in terms of generating value on the basepaths. It's a good thing his bat works OK.

    279. B.J. Upton, CF, Atlanta Braves

    60/100

    Upton still has tremendous natural talent, but the warning signs were there in 2012 that his game was falling apart, and he’s done nothing in 2013 to prove that it was all a fluke. He may be paid like one of the top center fielders in the league, but he's been one of the worst this year as far as his hitting is concerned.

    278. Mitch Moreland, 1B, Texas Rangers

    60/100

    Moreland is inconsistent when it comes to hitting, but he does bring good power to the table and can play a solid first base to boot.

    277. Brandon McCarthy, SP, Arizona Diamondbacks

    60/100

    Living with McCarthy means living with his injury problems. The good news is that he’s an outstanding command artist when he’s pitching, and his efficiency helps him make up for the fact that he is indeed quite hittable.

    276. Chris Tillman, SP, Baltimore Orioles

    60/100

    Tillman's not quite as good as his All-Star status says he is, as he's not an elite strikeout, command or ground-ball artist. But he does know how to pitch, and he's been a quality innings eater in 2013.

    275. Danny Salazar, SP, Cleveland Indians

    60/100

    Salazar’s fastball-changeup combination is deadly, and he's shown that he has the ability to maintain his stuff deep into games. It was always possible that he'd have to settle for a life as a reliever, but he instead looks like he could be a dangerous starter.

    274. Josh Willingham, LF, Minnesota Twins

    60/100

    You can be forgiven if you forgot that Willingham was even out there, but he has a good power bat and can get on base. If he could run, field or stay healthy, he’d be a star-level player.

    273. Nelson Cruz, RF, Texas Rangers

    60/100

    The big cloud hanging over Cruz’s head right now says “Biogenesis” on it. But below it stands a premier power hitter who will be heard from again.

    272. Jed Lowrie, SS, Oakland A's

    60/100

    Our scoring system admittedly didn't work in Lowrie's favor, as his shortcomings as a baserunner and defensive player loomed just as large as his hitting talents. However, let the record show that he's been one of the best-hitting shortstops in the league in 2013.

    271. Yoenis Cespedes, LF, Oakland A's

    60/100

    Cespedes has loads of talent, but he's failed to put it all together in 2013 after teasing himself as a potential MVP in 2012. This is not to call him a scrub, mind you, as even in a trying season he's still offered a solid bat, good power and very good defense.

    270. Eddie Butler, SP, Colorado Rockies

    61/100

    Butler isn’t as well known as many of his peers, but he should be. The right-hander has three pitches that grade as plus or better, as well as a vastly underrated feel for pitching. The only question is whether his arm action and command will translate at the highest level.

    269. Robert Stephenson, SP, Cincinnati Reds

    61/100

    Stephenson has taken off over the last year thanks to a fastball that touches elite velocity and a surprisingly advanced feel for pitching. His curveball has become a more consistent pitch this season and played a role in the right-hander’s success at more advanced levels. Stephenson has the ceiling of a front-line starting pitcher.

    268. Addison Russell, SS, Oakland A's

    61/100

    Although he’s looked raw at times this season as a 19-year-old in High-A, Russell has the makings of a dynamic shortstop at the major league level, with four above-average or better tools that will only improve with experience.

    267. Jason Motte, RP, St. Louis Cardinals

    61/85

    Motte hasn't been seen in 2013, but he should be along sometime early in 2014 season. If all goes well, he'll recapture his old stuff and command and go back to being one of the MLB's more overpowering late-inning relievers.

    266. Hank Conger, C, Los Angeles Angels

    61/100

    The Angels have one guy who was supposed to be a good catcher and one guy who actually is a good catcher. Conger is the latter guy. He can hit for some pop and handle the position finely on the defensive end, particularly when it comes to receiving the ball.

    265. Tim Hudson, SP, Atlanta Braves

    61/100

    By all rights, Hudson should rank higher on this list, as he’s a pitcher with a deep repertoire, good command and a longstanding expertise at racking up ground balls. But the ankle injury he suffered in July was a brutal one that only added to an extensive list of injuries he's suffered throughout his career.

    264. Jarrod Dyson, CF, Kansas City Royals

    61/100

    Dyson’s game is all about speed. It’s a good thing that he does a good job of putting it to use both on the basepaths and in the outfield, because there’s not much there if you take away his wheels.

    263. Chris Young, CF, Oakland A's

    61/100

    Young hasn't been heard from very often during his time as a platoon player in 2013, but he shouldn't be judged by this silence too much. He's a good-fielding center fielder with power in his bat and speed to use on the basepaths. Such things come in handy.

    262. Addison Reed, RP, Chicago White Sox

    61/85

    Reed still doesn't come off as a finished product just yet, but he has made improvements with his command and his ability to miss bats in 2013. Naturally, he's been a more effective pitcher, and it bodes well for him that he appears to be trending in the right direction.

    261. Justin Smoak, 1B, Seattle Mariners

    61/100

    There’s still some untapped potential in Smoak's bat. But with more hits falling and a decent number of them being sent a long way, his bat is certainly more alive than it's ever been.

    260. Mike Leake, SP, Cincinnati Reds

    61/100

    Leake's stuff is far from overpowering, but he commands it well enough to avoid walks better than the average pitcher. He also eats a decent number of innings for a back-end guy. 

    259. Carlos Quentin, LF, San Diego Padres

    61/100

    There’s nothing wrong with Quentin’s bat, as he can get on base and hit for power. Ideal stuff for a corner outfielder. It’s his baserunning, fielding and health that should worry everyone.

    258. Edwin Jackson, SP, Chicago Cubs

    61/100

    There’s not much to Jackson’s approach. It’s fastballs and sliders and more fastballs and sliders. But he has made an effort to incorporate a two-seamer more often this season, and it’s helped pay off in the form of more ground balls. He has a bad ERA, but his performance has been solid.

    257. Francisco Lindor, SS, Cleveland Indians

    62/100

    Lindor has a realistic ceiling of being the best defensive shortstop in the game—a projection that will only improve as he continues to grow as a hitter. Even if the switch-hitter’s bat doesn’t develop as expected, Lindor has the potential to enjoy a long, successful career in the major leagues based on his defensive merits.

    256. Kris Bryant, 3B, Chicago Cubs

    62/100

    The No. 2 overall selection in the 2013 draft, Bryant has the potential to move quickly through the Cubs system thanks to an advanced approach and gaudy power. While there’s some uncertainty as to whether he’ll remain at third base or move to a corner outfield spot, his bat could have him in the major leagues midway through 2014 (or even before, a la Mike Zunino).

    255. Gregory Polanco, CF, Pittsburgh Pirates

    62/100

    Polanco’s tools and feel for the game are both highly impressive for a player of his age and experience. This season, the outfielder’s defense has caught up to his bat, which helps explain why he’s emerged as one of baseball’s more intriguing prospects.

    254. Ichiro Suzuki, RF, New York Yankees

    62/100

    A recent slump has killed Ichiro's numbers, but he was hitting around .300 for the better part of the season. He's also still capable of providing value on the basepaths and can still play a solid right field.

    253. Jordan Walden, RP, Atlanta Braves

    61/85

    Surprised to see Walden so high? Don’t be. He’s a new man with the Braves, one with three awesome pitches and improved command. After a brief hiatus, he’s a stopper again.

    252. Steve Cishek, RP, Miami Marlins

    62/85

    Cishek doesn’t have as many saves as some of the top closers in the league, but he’s a better pitcher than some of them. His sinker-slider combination has proven to be a good match for the ninth inning, and his reliability over the last two seasons is absolutely commendable. 

    251. Edward Mujica, RP, St. Louis Cardinals

    62/85

    It would be great if Mujica had an overpowering fastball to go with his splitter, but his excellent command and uncanny reliability in 2013 make for a fair trade.

250-201: Davis-Profar

7 of 109

    250. Ike Davis, 1B, New York Mets

    62/100

    It’s downright ugly when things are out of whack for Davis, but he worked his way back from the brink of disaster in 2012 and was able to do so again in 2013 before he got hurt. When he's right, he's working counts and hitting for power.

    249. Adam Lind, 1B, Toronto Blue Jays

    62/100

    Lind’s 2009 production looks like a clear outlier, but at least he’s back to being a productive major leaguer again. So long as he's only playing against righties, he's a quality on-base guy with power.

    248. Rick Porcello, SP, Detroit Tigers

    62/100

    Porcello is the unluckiest good starter in baseball. He's consistently better than his numbers say he is, and one of these days that's going to change. When it happens, he's going to be cemented as one of the better mid-rotation guys out there.

    247. Wade Miley, SP, Arizona Diamondbacks

    62/100

    Miley’s sophomore effort hasn’t been as strong as his rookie effort, but to call it a disappointment would be a stretch. He still has solid stuff and has been terrific at keeping the ball on the ground in 2013. 

    246. Wei-Yin Chen, SP, Baltimore Orioles

    62/100

    Chen is one of the more boring pitchers at work today, but he gets by with good command and solid stuff. He's one of the more overlooked quality start machines out there.

    245. Carlos Ruiz, C, Philadelphia Phillies

    62/100

    There have been times this season when Chooch has looked absolutely finished as a player—or at least like a depressing shell of the player he was in 2012. But he’s looked reborn as a hitter in recent weeks and is still a steady presence behind the dish.

    244. A.J. Pierzynski, C, Texas Rangers

    62/100

    Pierzynski isn't a gem of a defensive catcher, and his lack of patience in 2013 makes his batting average out to be awfully hollow. These complaints aside, he is one of the better hitters at the position, and his power outburst in 2012 has somewhat survived into 2013.

    243. Alcides Escobar, SS, Kansas City Royals

    62/100

    Escobar's at-bats are tough to watch, but he’s a threat on the basepaths and a very good defender at shortstop. It doesn't take much more than that to be a productive player at the position.

    242. Zack Cozart, SS, Cincinnati Reds

    62/100

    It doesn't look like Cozart is going to be much of a hitter, but his power, baserunning and defense are all good enough to hold down a job as a regular.

    241. Mike Zunino, C, Seattle Mariners

    62/100

    Zunino made his major league debut barely a year after the Mariners drafted him third overall, which goes to show how highly they think of him. Though it may take some time for Zunino to develop as an offensive force, he should be able to hold his own while playing solid defense in 2014.

    240. Kris Medlen, SP, Atlanta Braves

    62/100

    It turns out that Medlen’s brilliant run last season was just a tease, but he’s continued to be a solid starter in 2013 thanks to his good command and ability to eat a fair number of innings.

    239. Mark Ellis, 2B, Los Angeles Dodgers

    62/100

    Ellis isn't much for power, but he's not bad at getting on base and can still handle himself at second base. He's also one of those guys who seems to lead the league in doing "the little things."

    238. Ben Revere, CF, Philadelphia Phillies

    62/100

    Speed, speed and more speed, as well as a supreme ability to put the ball in play. That's what Revere is all about, and he does these things well enough to earn his keep as a regular.

    237. Marco Scutaro, 2B, San Francisco Giants

    62/100

    Scutaro is among the best in the business at putting the bat on the ball, and for that he deserves no shortage of credit. But he doesn't do much besides hit singles, as he doesn't have much power to offer and isn't much of a defender at second base.

    236. Pablo Sandoval, 3B, San Francisco Giants

    62/100

    Sandoval has had years in which he's been one of the best in the business at third base both offensively and defensively. But it's abundantly clear by now how much both his offensive and defensive potential hinge on his weight, and there are never any sure bets about that.

    235. Brandon Moss, 1B, Oakland A's

    62/100

    Moss strikes out a lot, and he's not very useful on defense at first base. However, he hits for more than enough power to pass as a capable regular.

    234. Daniel Nava, OF, Boston Red Sox

    62/100

    Nava is absolutely terrific at getting on base, as he has the eye to draw walks and the contact habits to support a high BABIP. But his power is pedestrian, and he's not much of a defender.

    233. Alfonso Soriano, OF, New York Yankees

    62/100

    Soriano’s at-bats aren’t exactly lessons on how to hit, but he still has pop in his bat and speed in his legs. Also, he's better in left field than he gets credit for.

    232. Aramis Ramirez, 3B, MIL Brewers

    62/100

    Ramirez has had a hard time staying healthy in 2013, and living with him has always meant living with poor defense. But he can still hit and still hit for power, so don't write him off just yet.

    231. Juan Uribe, 3B, Los Angeles Dodgers

    62/100

    Uribe's bat has become useful again in 2013, and that's not all he's good for. Somewhat quietly, he's had a terrific season defensively at the hot corner.

    230. Gerardo Parra, OF, Arizona Diamondbacks

    62/100

    Parra's value is located almost entirely in his glove, and that only earned him so much respect in our scoring system for corner outfielders. That said, please let the record show that his defense is truly outstanding.

    229. Josh Reddick, RF, Oakland A's

    62/100

    Reddick was quietly one of the best players in baseball when he was hitting home runs and playing an excellent right field. The offensive production hasn't been there in 2013, but his glove is still terrific, and his baserunning talent must not be overlooked.

    228. Miguel Sano, 3B, Minnesota Twins

    63/100

    Sano’s prospect stock blew up in a big way this season thanks to the significant improvements he’s made on both sides of the ball. While power will always be his calling card in the majors, his hit tool and defense both have the potential to be slightly above average.

    227. Cameron Maybin, CF, San Diego Padres

    63/100

    Maybin has never been the kind of game-changing player he was once billed as, and now his health is compromised. But when he’s healthy, he’s a guy who can provide value with his speed both on the basepaths and in the outfield, and that’s been enough to make him a quality regular.

    226. Joaquin Benoit, RP, Tampa Bay Rays

    63/85

    Benoit has a legit repertoire that he commands well and uses to miss bats, but the best thing about his 2013 is how ridiculously reliable he's been while handling a ton of high-leverage situations.

    225. Danny Farquhar, RP, Seattle Mariners

    63/85

    Farquhar is still largely an unknown, but his stuff is best described as "beautiful," and he's used it to rack up a ton of strikeouts in 2013. If he can keep that up, there's no question he can be an elite reliever.

    224. Anthony Rendon, 2B, Washington Nationals

    63/100

    Rendon is still getting used to second base, but he's shown that he can hit at the MLB level. There should also be more power coming, meaning he has the potential to be a star-caliber player at second base.

    223. Jedd Gyorko, 2B, San Diego Padres

    63/100

    Gyorko's stint on the disabled list earlier in the summer threw him for a loop offensively, but his bat looks like a good one that also has some power.

    222. Pedro Florimon, SS, Minnesota Twins

    63/100

    Florimon is a poor offensive shortstop, so the bar only goes so high with him. But his defense is downright terrific, and he can run the bases well too.

    221. Erick Aybar, SS, Los Angeles Angels

    63/100

    There’s nothing Aybar does particularly well, but there are worse bats at the shortstop position than his, and his legs haven't completely abandoned him just yet.

    220. Mark Buehrle, SP, Toronto Blue Jays

    63/100

    Buehrle is baseball's resident "crafty left-hander." He has below-average stuff across the board, but he hasn't lost his command and general pitching know-how. Best of all, he's still a top-notch innings eater.

    219. Todd Frazier, 3B, Cincinnati Reds

    63/100

    Frazier’s bat has been a disappointment following his strong offensive showing as a rookie last year. But it's really only declined to average territory, and Frazier's baserunning and defense more than make him worth the trouble.

    218. Will Middlebrooks, 3B, Boston Red Sox

    63/100

    Middlebrooks patched up his key weaknesses during his stint in the minors and has looked like a completely different hitter since reemerging. If he can keep it up, he'll be a power-hitting third baseman who also does a decent job of getting on base.

    217. Tim Lincecum, SP, San Francisco Giants

    63/100

    The old Tim Lincecum is gone for good, but the new one has shown a better understanding of the art of pitching, and he can still eat innings as well as the old one.

    216. Daniel Murphy, 2B, New York Mets

    63/100

    There are better places to look for power and defense at second base, but Murphy brings a solid bat and underrated baserunning skills to the table, and these things are plenty good enough.

    215. Lorenzo Cain, CF, Kansas City Royals

    63/100

    Cain’s not a bad hitter, but he doesn't offer much power and is a surprisingly mediocre baserunner. But he can play some serious D in center field, and that's not worth nothing.

    214. R.A. Dickey, SP, Toronto Blue Jays

    63/100

    Dickey’s star has faded considerably in 2013, as his knuckleball has lost some of its luster. However, his knuckler is still a darn good one, and he still has value as an innings eater.

    213. Jon Jay, CF, St. Louis Cardinals

    63/100

    Jay’s biggest sin as a player is being boring, as he’s not a spectacular hitter, power hitter, baserunner or defender. But his bat is good enough to hold down a job in the majors, and he plays a solid enough center field.

    212. Angel Pagan, CF, San Francisco Giants

    63/100

    Pagan’s bat isn't that much better than the average center fielder's, and he doesn't play that great of a center field to boot. But he's dynamite when he gets hot, and his legs tend to be a terrific source of value.

    211. Martin Perez, SP, Texas Rangers

    63/100

    Perez is still working on establishing himself, but there's no question he's put himself on the map with the season he's had. His stuff and control are quite good, and a pitcher can go far with those two things.

    210. Will Venable, OF, San Diego Padres

    63/100

    Venable has put up some power numbers this season that can't be taken at face value, but he is a solid hitter who can run the bases well and play some solid D in the outfield.

    209. Brett Lawrie, 3B, Toronto Blue Jays

    63/100

    Lawrie has improvements to make as a hitter, but it's good enough for now that his power has made a comeback in 2013. While he is prone to making mistakes, he can definitely handle defense at the hot corner.

    208. Hyun-Jin Ryu, SP, Los Angeles Dodgers

    63/100

    Ryu doesn't have overpowering stuff, but he does have good command, a solid ability to miss bats and the capacity to eat a fair number of innings.

    207. Jarrod Saltalamacchia, C, Boston Red Sox

    63/100

    It’s still possible to nitpick certain aspects of Salty’s game, but let’s give him credit for becoming far more consistent at the plate while retaining most of his power. He's not a great all-around catcher, but he's definitely one of the better-hitting catchers out there.

    206. Ricky Nolasco, SP, Los Angeles Dodgers

    63/100

    Nolasco has been more than just another innings eater in 2013. He's gotten back to missing bats and has gone back to baffling hitters as a result.

    205. Jonathan Gray, SP, Colorado Rockies

    64/100

    Everything about Gray is powerful: the stuff, the delivery, the mound presence. The right-hander could probably pitch in the major leagues right now, though the Rockies obviously are in no rush to get him to The Show. As long as he can stay healthy, it may be difficult for the organization to keep him in the minors next season for more than a few months.

    204. George Springer, CF, Houston Astros

    64/100

    Few players in the minors are as naturally gifted as Springer. For that reason, there are even fewer players with as high of a ceiling as the Astros’ future center fielder. More specifically, Springer’s game-changing power-speed combination will make him an impact player in the major leagues. 

    203. Didi Gregorius, SS, Arizona Diamondbacks

    64/100

    Gregorius' offensive production has slowed down as the season has gone along. But he's done enough to prove that his bat isn't as terrible as it was billed as, and there's a lot to like about his defense.

    202. Xander Bogaerts, SS, Boston Red Sox

    64/100

    Bogaerts has the ceiling of one of baseball’s top players, as he projects to be a plus hitter with plus power at a premium position. Even if he’s forced to slide over to the hot corner, his potent bat should still make him an All-Star-caliber player.

    201. Jurickson Profar, SS, Texas Rangers

    64/100

    Profar's standing in Texas is a bit iffy, but there's an alternate reality out there in which he's ready to be the player he has the talent to be: a slick-fielding shortstop with a good bat, a little power and some speed to burn on the basepaths.

200-151: Gentry-Johnson

8 of 109

    Kevin Jairaj-USA TODAY Sports

    200. Craig Gentry, CF, Texas Rangers

    64/100

    Gentry's bat doesn't pack a lot of punch. It's his speed that earns him his checks, and it comes in handy both on the basepaths and in the outfield.

    199. Joe Nathan, RP, Texas Rangers

    64/85

    Nathan is pretty well removed from his most overpowering days, as he can't blow hitters away anymore. But he still features good stuff, and is as reliable as ever when he enters a game in the ninth.

    198. Bartolo Colon, SP, Oakland A's

    64/100

    It's all fastballs, all the time when Colon is on the mound. While he's not good at missing bats or keeping the ball on the ground, he has the command and the durability to pile up innings.

    197. Kyle Lohse, SP, Milwaukee Brewers

    64/100

    Lohse's stuff is as underwhelming as it ever is, but he's another guy who gets by on terrific command well enough to pile up innings.

    196. Wilin Rosario, C, Colorado Rockies

    64/100

    Rosario has been better defensively in 2013 than he was in 2012, but he's still not a very capable defender behind the dish. It's a good thing he can handle a bat, especially when it comes to power.

    195. A.J. Ellis, C, Los Angeles Dodgers

    64/100

    Ellis' bat has a tendency to come and go, but he's not a bad hitter as far as catchers go. His real talents show through when he's behind the dish, however, as he's one of the top receivers in the game and has been outstanding controlling the running game in 2013.

    194. Miguel Montero, C, Arizona Diamondbacks

    64/100

    This has been a rough year for Montero's bat, but it's not beyond saving. And even in the event that his hitting doesn't come all the way back, he's still a terrific guy to have behind the plate.

    193. Andre Ethier, OF, Los Angeles Dodgers

    64/100

    Ethier's not a very good defensive outfielder, and his offensive ceiling only goes so high. But he certainly is an above-average hitter who can get on base and offer a bit of power—so long as there's not a lefty on the mound, of course.

    192. Nate McLouth, OF, Baltimore Orioles

    64/100

    McLouth was a power-speed threat back in 2008, but now his game is more about speed and contact. That makes him a throwback, but it certainly doesn’t make him out of place.

    191. Juan Lagares, CF, New York Mets

    64/100

    Lagares’ bat and baserunning needs some polish, but he’s got some pop and can play a mean center field. He was a guy who only prospect nuts knew about not too long ago, but now it looks like he may be sticking around as an MLB regular for a while.

    190. Jarrod Parker, SP, Oakland A's

    64/100

    Parker has some quality stuff at his disposal, and it's been working wonderfully ever since a slow start to the season. There's going to be some serious trouble if he sharpens up his command and starts missing more bats than the average starting pitcher.

    189. Chris Archer, SP, Tampa Bay Rays

    64/100

    On fire ever since early July, Archer is a young pitcher with a live arm whose command has gotten better and better as time has passed. He's not there yet, but he has the look of a potential top-of-the-rotation starter.

    188. Albert Pujols, 1B, Los Angeles Angels

    64/100

    Bad health played a significant role in Pujols' subpar season, but it's getting hard to be optimistic about him. His body isn't going to get in better shape as he gets older, and his declining skills as a hitter date back a couple years at this point.

    187. Alex Rodriguez, 3B, New York Yankees

    64/100

    Is Rodriguez what he once was? No. Will he even play in 2014? Nobody knows for now. But in his relatively brief time back, he's made it clear enough that he can still hit better than most third baseman.

    186. Zack Wheeler, SP, New York Mets

    64/100

    Wheeler definitely has the stuff to be a frontline starter, and up until recently he was showing off passable control and an ability to miss bats. After getting his feet wet in 2013, he could take off in 2014.

    185. Mike Napoli, 1B, Boston Red Sox

    64/100

    Napoli still strikes out a ton, and his power has been coming and going in his first year in Boston. But the pop is still there, he still gets on base and he's proven to be a surprisingly good defender at first base.

    184. Martin Prado, 3B, Arizona Diamondbacks

    64/100

    Prado's season got off to a rough start, but things clicked for him eventually. He's been one of the league's top hitters over the last few months, and he plays a solid third base to boot.

    183. Travis Wood, SP, Chicago Cubs

    64/100

    Wood can only be so good as long as he’s walking more hitters than the average pitcher, pitching to contact in the air and eating only six innings out of time, but he’s pretty well established as one of the more “safe” pitchers out there with the way he’s pitched over the last two years.

    182. Ryan Zimmerman, 3B, Washington Nationals

    64/100

    Zimmerman's defense at the hot corner is a very real concern going forward, but he's still a good hitter. It's also worth noting this score was tallied before Zimmerman decided his best course of action was to start hitting everything over the fence.

    181. Pedro Alvarez, 3B, Pittsburgh Pirates

    64/100

    Alvarez is a highly inconsistent hitter and a subpar fielder, but he's one of only three third basemen to hit as many as 60 homers over the last two seasons. The other two: Adrian Beltre and Miguel Cabrera. Power is something he has covered.

    180. Carl Crawford, LF, Los Angeles Dodgers

    64/100

    At his peak, Crawford was a very good hitter who could hit for power, run the bases and play an outstanding left field. He’s now a much lesser version of that player, but he obviously still passes for a worthwhile regular.

    179. Ryan Raburn, OF, Cleveland Indians

    65/100

    Raburn isn’t the outstanding hitter that his numbers—racked up in part-time duty, for the record—say he is, but there’s no denying he has made improvements as a hitter that have paid off and, in turn, put him on the map.

    178. Marlon Byrd, OF, Pittsburgh Pirates

    65/100

    Sometimes guys who appear washed-up fade into the background, and sometimes they reinvent themselves into power hitters and stick around for a while longer. Byrd belongs to the latter collection.

    177. Alexei Ramirez, SS, Chicago White Sox

    65/100

    Ramirez's power is becoming more of a lost cause as time goes by, and he's still not the kind of guy who's going to take a walk. However, he makes up for his poor hitting by being productive on the basepaths, and he still plays a terrific shortstop. 

    176. A.J. Pollock, CF, Arizona Diamondbacks

    65/100

    Pollock’s bat is nothing special, but his legs definitely have a home in the major leagues. They’re what help him get around the bases and make astonishing plays in the outfield.

    175. Peter Bourjos, CF, Los Angeles Angels

    65/100

    Bourjos' glove is special, and he has the legs to do damage on the basepaths. But his bat is really just OK, and there are obvious health concerns after what's happened to him in 2013.

    174. Mark Trumbo, 1B, Los Angeles Angels

    65/100

    Trumbo strikes out too much and doesn't get on base often enough. But he definitely has power, and don't overlook his defensive talents at first base.

    173. Coco Crisp, CF, Oakland A's

    65/100

    Crisp’s game is still based largely on his speed, which is not as explosive these days and isn’t going to get more explosive as he gets deeper into his 30s. But he can still hit, is hitting for some solid power and can still run and play defense better than most.

    172. Welington Castillo, C, Chicago Cubs

    65/100

    Castillo’s power has been a disappointment in 2013, but he's more than a solid hitter as far as catchers go. More importantly, he's a very strong defensive presence behind the dish.

    171. Nolan Arenado, 3B, Colorado Rockies

    65/100

    Arenado’s bat is unproven, but signs of life have been there in the second half. Even if he becomes only an average hitter down the road, his defense is good enough to put him among the game's top third basemen.

    170. Chase Headley, 3B, San Diego Padres

    65/100

    The power surge that Headley enjoyed in the second half of 2012 has proven to be a big tease, but he still has some pop to offer, and he's been victimized by some bad luck throughout the 2013 season. His bat is better than his numbers say, and he certainly still plays a solid third base.

    169. Jose Quintana, SP, Chicago White Sox

    65/100

    Chris Sale gets all the attention, as well he should. But Quintana was quietly good in 2012, and he's done it once again this year. He misses bats better than the average starter, and also has some solid command to work with. He's one of the more underappreciated starters in the American League.

    168. Torii Hunter, RF, Detroit Tigers

    65/100

    Hunter used to be a game-changing defensive center fielder who had both power and speed to put to use on offense. He’s not that guy anymore, but he can still handle himself at the plate and he now plays solid D out in right field.

    167. Alex Rios, RF, Texas Rangers

    65/100

    Rios was quietly one of the best all-around players in the game in 2012, but he’s been a “just OK” player for the better part of the last five years. His bat isn't much better than average, but he does deserve credit for his underrated baserunning and solid defense in right field.

    166. Denard Span, CF, Washington Nationals

    65/100

    Span can only be so good without power and a good baserunning tool, but he passes for solid as a hitter and is a guy a lot of teams would love to have in center field.

    165. Carlos Santana, C, Cleveland Indians

    65/100

    Santana’s bat is fine; it’s one of the best at the position. But catcher is the most important defensive position on the field, and Santana’s issues on defense are very real.

    164. Domonic Brown, OF, Philadelphia Phillies

    65/100

    This score may seem low in light of Brown’s breakout this year, but all we really know about him is that he excels at hitting for power. The jury’s still out on everything else.

    163. Carlos Beltran, RF, St. Louis Cardinals

    65/100

    There’s not much there if you take Beltran’s bat away, but why would anyone do that? His walk habit hasn't been very strong in 2013, but he can still hit and hit for power.

    162. Matt Holliday, LF, St. Louis Cardinals

    65/100

    Anything hit in Holliday's direction in left field could turn into an adventure, and it's pretty clear that his best days as a power hitter are in the past. But he can still hit for a respectable average, and he still has a discerning eye that helps him boost his OBP with walks.

    161. Taijuan Walker, SP, Seattle Mariners

    66/100

    Walker went through a learning year in 2012 when he struggled as a teenager in Double-A. However, his ability to make adjustments and work through his issues has paid huge dividends this season. He’ll look raw at times and endure bouts of wildness, but Walker has both the stuff and potential to serve as the Mariners’ ace for years to come.  

    160. Mark Appel, SP, Houston Astros

    66/100

    Appel has been tabbed as a future ace since the beginning of the 2012 season and shouldn’t require much time in the minor leagues. But while his arsenal ranks as one of the more advanced and polished among pitching prospects, Appel’s approach and feel for sequencing may need to be adjusted as he climbs the organizational ladder.

    159. Ivan Nova, SP, New York Yankees

    66/100

    Nova has been iffy in September, but there's no denying that his stint in the minors earlier in the year was worth it. He really sharpened up his command, and has gotten better at keeping the ball on the ground while still missing more bats than the average starter.

    158. Evan Gattis, C, Atlanta Braves

    66/100

    There's plenty of rawness to Gattis' game, but he has more power than any other catcher and he's not entirely out of his league behind the dish. He's done a passable job controlling the running game and has proven to be a solid receiver.

    157. Jhonny Peralta, SS, Detroit Tigers

    66/100

    It might be easy to downplay the season Peralta was having before he got suspended, but take note of the fact that he definitely wasn’t getting any help from Biogenesis. He's better than he gets credit for defensively, and he got back to being one of the top hitting shortstops in the league after a down year in 2012.

    156. Jose Iglesias, SS, Detroit Tigers

    66/100

    Iglesias very likely isn't a .300 hitter in real life, but he's made it clear enough that he can cut is as a hitter in the majors. And that's outstanding news, because he's one of the best in the business defensively at short.

    155. Dexter Fowler, CF, Colorado Rockies

    66/100

    Contrary to what he teased in the early goings this year, Fowler is not a great player, and he’s not even particularly great at any one thing. But he can hit, and he does boast a solid mix of power and speed that serves him well.

    154. Michael Bourn, CF, Cleveland Indians

    66/100

    Bourn’s stolen base prowess is gone, and with it has gone much of his value. But he can still run, and he can still flash the leather. Not star-level stuff, but it’ll do.

    153. Wilson Ramos, C, Washington Nationals

    66/100

    Ramos emerged as a very promising young player in 2011. Injuries did their part to hold him down after that, but he looks back now. His approach isn't very refined, but he can whack the living daylights out of the ball while providing quality defense behind the dish.

    152. James Loney, 1B, Tampa Bay Rays

    66/100

    Loney seemed to be a lost cause when he left Boston at the end of 2012, but the Rays have turned him into one of MLB's top line drive hitters. His numbers have benefited, and Loney's defense at first shouldn't be overlooked.

    151. Chris Johnson, 3B, Atlanta Braves

    66/100

    Asking Johnson to maintain a .400 BABIP isn't fair, but he has earned his high batting average this year by hitting a ton of balls on a line. It's too bad his power has taken a turn for the worse.

150-101: Perez-Cueto

9 of 109

    Jamie Squire/Getty Images

    150. Salvador Perez, C, Kansas City Royals

    66/100

    Perez is one of the best in the business behind the dish, and it's a good sign that he's rediscovered his power in the second half of the season. Defense-first catchers who can also hit for a little power don't grow on trees, you know.

    149. Jay Bruce, RF, Cincinnati Reds

    66/100

    Bruce is a monster when he gets hot, but his reputation as a hot-and-cold hitter is undeniably well deserved. All the same, he can be put down for 30 homers and quality D in right field.

    148. Noah Syndergaard, SP, New York Mets

    67/100

    Syndergaard has emerged as one of the game’s top pitching prospects, as his four pitches have noticeably improved and resulted in even sharper command. The right-hander has a realistic chance of reaching his ceiling of a frontline starter and would fit nicely between Matt Harvey and Zack Wheeler in the team’s future rotation.

    147. Kyle Zimmer, SP, Kansas City Royals

    67/100

    Zimmer has the potential to be a monster with four impressive offerings and above-average command, as well as knowledge on how to attack hitters and exploit weaknesses. The only thing that could seemingly prevent him from a great career in the major leagues is an injury—something that has already been an issue after two seasons in the minors.

    146. Mark Teixeira, 1B, New York Yankees

    67/100

    The wrist problems Teixeira have dealt with in 2013 are a concern, as few things can derail a hitter quite like wrist injuries. However, he proved in his small sample of plate appearances this season that he still has a terrific eye. If he still has some power and can still play an outstanding first base when he comes back, he'll continue being one of MLB's top first basemen.

    145. Adam LaRoche, 1B, Washington Nationals

    67/100

    Take away LaRoche's horrid start in April, and his 2013 season doesn't look nearly as bad. He's essentially been the same hitter that he was in 2012, minus some power. Also, he's typically a quality defender at first base.

    144. Brian Dozier, 2B, Minnesota Twins

    67/100

    Dozier's bat is inconsistent, but he above-average power for a second baseman, he can run the bases, and he also plays some quality D.

    143. Alex Cobb, SP, Tampa Bay Rays

    67/100

    Cobb isn’t a pitcher who’s on a lot of radars out there, but he should be. He has some sneaky-good stuff, quality command, and has been better about missing bats in 2013.

    142. Anthony Rizzo, 1B, Chicago Cubs

    67/100

    Rizzo's been bitten by some bad luck in 2013, but he does still have some developing to do as a hitter. The good news is that the power's been there, and he also plays a terrific first base.

    141. Ian Kinsler, 2B, Texas Rangers

    67/100

    Kinsler still excels at putting the ball in play, and he's still a good defender at second base. The bigger concerns have to do with his power and baserunning, which are not what they once were.

    140. Leonys Martin, CF, Texas Rangers

    67/100

    Martin is a guy we’ve been hearing about for a while, and this is the season in which he’s finally (and, admittedly, quietly) established himself. His bat is still a work in progress, but his glove and baserunning skills definitely make the grade.

    139. Stephen Drew, SS, Boston Red Sox

    67/100

    It’s happened somewhat quietly, but 2013 has been a comeback year for Drew. He's played a good shortstop, and has been one of the top hitters at the position for a better part of the season.

    138. Jake Peavy, SP, Boston Red Sox

    67/100

    Living with Peavy means living with some home runs, but he has a solid arsenal of pitches at his disposal and terrific command of them. He also misses bats better than the average starter, and can eat a fair amount of innings.

    137. Neil Walker, 2B, Pittsburgh Pirates

    67/100

    Walker is one of the better hitters you're going to find at second base, as he's a solid line-drive machine and can also work his share of walks. He also does enough defensively to pass as a quality defensive second baseman.

    136. Jon Lester, SP, Boston Red Sox

    67/100

    It’s been a few years since Lester was a dominant force, but he has bounced back from a brutal 2012 season. He's not as overpowering as he used to be, but he has decent command and eat plenty of innings.

    135. Prince Fielder, 1B, Detroit Tigers

    67/100

    Fielder has turned things around in a big way recently, but the 2013 season will eventually go into the books as one of his worst, especially in the power department. That can't happen with him, as he's incapable of replacing that lost value by playing good D or running the bases.

    134. Matt Cain, SP, San Francisco Giants

    68/100

    Cain’s stuff hasn't been the same in 2013, and there have been days in which that's gotten him in a lot of trouble. But he hasn't totally lost his command, and he still has value as an innings eater.

    133. CC Sabathia, SP, New York Yankees

    68/100

    Sabathia's another guy whose stuff has taken a step back in 2013, as has his ability to miss bats. He's been hit and hit hard this season. But given that he still has his command and his ability to eat innings, he's not a lost cause just yet.

    132. Archie Bradley, SP, Arizona Diamondbacks

    68/100

    Bradley’s pure stuff is ridiculously powerful and arguably the best in the minor leagues. He has the athleticism and aptitude to make adjustments along the way, which only strengthens his projection as a future No. 1 starter.

    131. David Robertson, RP, New York Yankees

    68/100

    Remember what Mariano Rivera was to John Wetteland all those years back? That’s basically what Robertson is now. He has a terrific cutter of his own, and a good curveball to go with it. And in 2013, he's been lights-out.

    130. Lance Lynn, SP, St. Louis Cardinals

    68/100

    Lynn's biggest weakness is his inconsistency, which is what inconsistent command tends to bring about. But he has good stuff and misses more bats than most starters, and he's able to make it as a successful mid-rotation guy because of these habits.

    129. Omar Infante, 2B, Detroit Tigers

    68/100

    Infante is neither a household name nor, if we're being honest, a real star. But he's definitely overlooked in the realm of second basemen, as he's boasted an above-average bat and glove for several years now.

    128. Nick Swisher, 1B, Cleveland Indians

    68/100

    Swisher's first season in Cleveland has been largely disappointing, but it hasn't been a total wash. He hasn't lost his ability to get on base, and he's topped 20 homers once again. In addition, his transition over to first base has gone off without a hitch.

    127. Curtis Granderson, CF, New York Yankees

    68/100

    Granderson can be a frustrating hitter and fielder to watch, as he strikes out too much and can tend to make fly balls adventurous. But when he's right, he's the best home-run-hitting center fielder in the business.

    126. Everth Cabrera, SS, San Diego Padres

    68/100

    Cabrera’s PED suspension casts a cloud over his 2013 season, but consider this: As with Jhonny Peralta, we know for a fact that he wasn’t getting any help from Biogenesis. As long as he maintains the approach at the plate he was using in 2014, Cabrera should be heard from again as a shortstop who can hit and tear up the basepaths.

    125. Brandon Phillips, 2B, Cincinnati Reds

    68/100

    Phillips' RBI count is all well and good, but he's actually been a subpar hitter in 2013. It's a good thing he's still a better hitter than most second baseman, and he can still dazzle defensively at second base.

    124. Howie Kendrick, 2B, Los Angeles Angels

    68/100

    Kendrick is one of the top hitters you're going to find at second base, and he also handles the position well defensively. Not much more you can ask for, really.

    123. Michael Cuddyer, RF, Colorado Rockies

    68/100

    Cuddyer is a disaster on defense, and he's hardly a medical marvel at this point, but it’s hard to come up with additional complaints about his game. He’s not a bad baserunner, and he's had an outstanding season swinging the bat in 2013.

    122. Shane Victorino, RF, Boston Red Sox

    68/100

    After a challenging 2012 season, Victorino's bat has been reborn in 2013. He's also still a good runner, and he has proved to be an outstanding defensive right fielder.

    121. Adrian Gonzalez, 1B, Los Angeles Dodgers

    68/100

    Gonzalez was one of the best first basemen in the league back when he had elite power. He doesn’t now, but he can still hit and is among the best in the business defensively at first base.

    120. Kyle Seager, 3B, Seattle Mariners

    68/100

    Seager was a well-kept secret last year, and he’s been an even better-kept secret in 2013. He can hit, hit for power, and only appears to be getting better at doing both.

    119. Brett Gardner, CF, New York Yankees

    68/100

    Gardner had better years in 2010 and 2011 when his speed made him a treasure chest of hidden value. His speed hasn’t been as big of a factor in 2013, but this season has seen him add some power while playing a solid center field.

    118. Jhoulys Chacin, SP, Colorado Rockies

    68/100

    For you Rockies fans who have been watching Chacin closely this season, I know: He's been better than this ranking indicates. In fact, he's had a downright terrific season. He was hurt by our scoring system because he's neither an elite strikeout artist nor an elite command artist, and he still has some proving to do as a workhorse.

    117. Shin-Soo Choo, CF, Cincinnati Reds

    68/100

    The scoring system we devised hurt Choo because of his struggles defensively in center field. So just know this: Getting on base is extremely important, and Choo is indeed extremely good at it. It's a bonus that he's none-too-shabby a power hitter.

    116. Eric Hosmer, 1B, Kansas City Royals

    68/100

    After a rocky 2012 and beginning to 2013, Hosmer has gotten back to hitting like he was in his promising rookie season in 2011. He has the goods to be one of the top hitters at the position, and he can also play D and run the bases well.

    115. Bronson Arroyo, SP, Cincinnati Reds

    69/100

    Arroyo can get hammered pretty bad when he’s off, but he’s on most of the time and has long been flying under the radar as one of the most effective innings eaters in recent memory. Some (heck, many) of the pitchers behind him on this list are more talented than he is, but his reliability earned him some props.

    114. Matt Garza, SP, Texas Rangers

    69/100

    Garza's foray into the American League hasn't gone so well, but don't mistake that for meaning he's not talented. He has some good stuff at his disposal, not to mention good command, an ability to miss bats and a solid capacity to eat innings.

    113. Matt Wieters, C, Baltimore Orioles

    69/100

    If Wieters ever finds a way to be more consistent at the plate, he’ll take his place among the absolute best of the best the catcher position has to offer. For now, at least he has power and terrific defense behind the plate to offer.

    112. Brandon Crawford, SS, San Francisco Giants

    69/100

    Crawford was already a terrific defensive shortstop and has continued to be one in 2013. What's really intriguing, however, is that his hitting is trending upwards.

    111. Aroldis Chapman, RP, Cincinnati Reds

    69/100

    Chapman has been easier to get to than he was in 2012, when he was untouchable virtually all season long. But he can still light up the radar gun, and he still misses bats better than 99.9 percent of relievers.

    110. J.J. Hardy, SS, Baltimore Orioles

    69/100

    Hardy's not much for getting on base, and that's indeed frustrating. But he has legit pop for a shortstop, and is also one of the top defenders at the position.

    109. C.J. Wilson, SP, Los Angeles Angels

    69/100

    Wilson's command can be erratic, and he's not one of the greats when it comes to missing bats. But he does have good stuff in his arsenal, and he can definitely eat innings and handle high pitch counts.

    108. A.J. Burnett, SP, Pittsburgh Pirates

    69/100

    Burnett's arsenal is still a simple one: fastballs and curveballs, repeat, repeat. He can also still be wild on occasion. However, he's one of the better strikeout artists out there, and he has the goods to eat up innings.

    107. Desmond Jennings, CF, Tampa Bay Rays

    69/100

    Jennings isn’t quite a star-level player, but he’s improved his offensive game in 2013 to a point where he now makes the grade as an above-average hitter. As a bonus, he also runs the bases well and plays a good center field.

    106. Yunel Escobar, SS, Tampa Bay Rays

    69/100

    Talent has never been a question with Escobar, and he’s spent 2013 reminding everyone of that. The Rays have revived his bat, and his glove has been downright terrific.

    105. Alex Gordon, LF, Kansas City Royals

    69/100

    Gordon’s hitting has been a bit suspect, but he's kept his power warm and is still a fine source of value running the bases and playing the field. He's had better seasons, but he's still one of baseball's most underappreciated players.

    104. Matt Moore, SP, Tampa Bay Rays

    69/100

    It’s distressing that Moore hasn’t made much progress with his command in 2013, but he has outstanding stuff in his arsenal and he's definitely capable of overpowering hitters.

    103. Allen Craig, 1B, St. Louis Cardinals

    69/100

    Craig’s power is trending the wrong way, and he's at best OK on defense at first base. But goodness knows he can hit with the best of 'em.

    102. Jason Grilli, RP, Pittsburgh Pirates

    70/85

    Grilli looked like closer material in 2012 when he used his fastball-slider combination to become one of the better strikeout artists in baseball. He got a shot in 2013, and turned into one of the most untoucable relievers in the game. But after his elbow betrayed him in July, there are certainly doubts.

    101. Johnny Cueto, SP, Cincinnati Reds

    70/100

    The health of Cueto's shoulder is a concern that's not going to go away. But if you look past that concern, what you see is a pitcher with terrific stuff who also has good command, a solid ability to miss bats and to keep the ball on the ground.

100. Mark Melancon, RP, Pittsburgh Pirates

10 of 109

    Stuff

    19/25

    Most relievers are fastball-slider, fastball-curveball or fastball-something. Melancon is a little different. He’s cutter-curveball, as his cutter accounts for about 75 percent of his pitches and his curveball accounts for another 15 percent. His cutter has good velocity at 92-93, though it’s not quite as overpowering as Kenley Jansen’s. His curveball is the more impressive pitch, as it has nasty two-plane break with slider velocity at 82-83 miles per hour.

    Command

    15/15

    Melancon seemed to have no idea where the ball was going when he was with Boston last year. It’s been the exact opposite for him in 2013, as he’s been pounding lefties inside and righties away with his cutter like clockwork and has walked under 4 percent of the batters he’s faced. That puts him among the elites.

    Hittability

    14/20

    Melancon isn’t as big of a swing-and-miss merchant as other elite relievers, as those aren’t really what he’s after with his cutter-heavy approach. Yet he does get more whiffs than the average reliever thanks to the fact that he gets his share of whiffs on his curveball. But while he has a solid strikeout rate around 25 percent, the really impressive thing is that nearly 60 percent of batted balls off him have been on the ground. He’s been very difficult to square up.

    Reliability

    13/15

    Melancon could be trusted about as far as he could be thrown in 2012. But in 2013, he’s been among the surest things the relief pitching profession has to offer. He’s been at the top of the shutdown charts all season long and has melted down only a couple times. What’s keeping him from a perfect score here is that this feels like a deal with the devil scenario after what happened in 2012.

    Health

    9/10

    Melancon has barely been hurt in his pro career…except for that one time he needed Tommy John surgery in 2006.

    Overall

    70/85

    Good stuff, excellent command and lots of balls on the ground. That’s been Melancon’s recipe for success in 2013, and it’s helped him turn into a dominant reliever.

99. Jered Weaver, SP, Los Angeles Angels

11 of 109

    Jeff Gross/Getty Images

    Stuff

    16/30

    Weaver goes pretty heavy on the fastballs, throwing his four-seamer and two-seamer close to 30 percent of the time apiece. The velocity on neither is above-average, but each has gotten better as the year has gone along. He was sitting in the mid-80s earlier in the season and is now sitting 87-88. He rounds out his arsenal with a curveball, slider and changeup. None of the three is particularly impressive. As good as Weaver is, it’s depth much more so than electricity that defines his arsenal.

    Command

    17/20

    Weaver’s walk rates the last few years have been in the low sixes like clockwork, and it’s the same old story in 2013. The key difference this year is that he’s throwing fewer than 40 percent of his pitches in the strike zone, but that’s by design. He’s gotten the gist that he’s better off flirting with the zone rather than live in it with his stuff, and his command is precise enough to make it work.

    Hittability 

    8/15

    For all that’s been made about Weaver’s various issues, he’s actually getting more whiffs in 2013 than he has in a few years. Yet his strikeout rate hasn’t skyrocketed back up to its old stomping grounds, still sitting roughly in the league-average territory. He’s also still prone to homers due to his reliance on fly balls. But since that’s been Weaver’s M.O. for many years and he’s been successful with it, it’s hard to scold him.

    Workhorse

    20/25

    Weaver increased his innings count each year between 2009 and 2011, but injuries kept him from doing so in 2012, and it’s the same story this year. Yet he’s still good for six innings and 100 pitches when he takes the ball, and seven-inning performances have been coming more frequently lately than earlier in the year.

    Health

    9/10

    Weaver’s broken arm from earlier in the year can be forgiven and forgotten, but it’s less easy to overlook his history of biceps problems and back aches. 

    Overall

    70/100

    Weaver’s diminished effectiveness earlier in 2013 made him look like a pitcher on the decline, but he’s looked a lot like himself ever since finding some extra velocity upon his return from injury.

98. John Lackey, SP, Boston Red Sox

12 of 109

    Jared Wickerham/Getty Images

    Stuff

    19/30

    Lackey doesn’t have a particularly deep arsenal, as he throws his four-seamer roughly 45 percent of the time and barely incorporates his two-seamer 10 percent of the time. But his four-seamer has good velocity at 92-93, and he complements it with a slider that’s pretty close to plus and a curveball that’s sharper than the average curveball.

    Command

    15/20

    Lackey tended to be all over the place with his command during his first two years in Boston, but it’s been a completely different story in 2013. He’s pounded the zone with his fastball more consistently and more aggressively than he did in 2010 or 2011, and he’s compiled a well-below-average walk rate in the five percent range in the process. 

    Hittability 

    11/15

    Lackey’s newfound mastery of the strike zone has resulted in more pitcher’s counts and, thus, more opportunities to expand the zone. He’s been taking advantage of those opportunities and has been rewarded with whiffs that have boosted his strikeout rate into the 20s. He’s also maintaining a ground-ball rate in the 50 percent neighborhood. But alas, the home runs...

    Workhorse

    18/25

    Lackey’s not going to cross 200 innings this year, but he’s basically been as dependable as a 200-inning starter. Despite barely averaging 100 pitches per start, he’s made it through six in the majority of his starts and has made it through seven about half the time.

    Health

    7/10

    Lackey is coming off a 2012 season in which he didn’t pitch due to his recovery from Tommy John surgery. Before that, he had gone on the DL twice with elbow-related injuries. After the surgery, he found himself on the DL in April with a biceps strain. Oh, and he's 35 in October.

    Overall

    70/100

    Remember when Lackey’s contract was a giant waste of money? Given the rate at which pitchers are signing for big dollars and then flopping, Lackey’s pact doesn’t look so bad all of a sudden.

97. Jose Reyes, SS, Toronto Blue Jays

13 of 109

    Hitting

    18/20

    Reyes is neither the most patient nor the most disciplined hitter in the league, so it’s a little surprising that he takes as many walks as he does. And while his strikeouts have gone up in the American League this year, he still strikes out far less often than your average hitter and is still ripping line drives all over the field from both sides of the plate. He peaked in 2011, but the guy can definitely hit.

    Power

    14/20

    Reyes is one of the great gap-power guys in baseball. Though he does also have the ability to hit the ball over the fence, he’s not the kind of guy to get homer-happy. He’s actually been hitting the ball in the air less often over the last couple years, with the trade-off being a more consistent line-drive approach. Such an approach suits him better.

    Baserunning

    19/20

    Reyes obviously isn’t the supreme speedster that he used to be, as age and injuries have taken their toll on his wheels. But he’s still a very fast mover when he’s healthy and is a terrific source of value both stealing bases and taking extra bases on balls in play. He hasn't been able to be these things in 2013, but an offseason of rest should set him right.

    Defense

    12/30

    The tools are all there, but Reyes’ defense hasn’t been good in many years. He’s not booting the ball this year as often as he usually does, but that’s owed at least in part to his range having declined. His speed is obviously fine, but he's not the most instinctive shortstop, and he just doesn't cover as much ground as he should.

    Health

    7/10

    Reyes was quietly a picture of health in 2012, but his troubles with hamstring injuries have been well documented, and this year he found himself on the DL with a bad ankle sprain. Those legs of his have a lot of mileage on them, and he's not getting younger.

    Overall

    70/100

    One worries about how much longer Reyes is going to be an elite player now that he’s on the wrong side of 30. Nonetheless, he still as one of the better bats the position has to offer, and his wheels pack a punch when he's healthy.

96. Hunter Pence, RF, San Francisco Giants

14 of 109

    Hitting

    18/30

    Pence has been more in control of himself at the plate than he was in 2012, when he was chasing every breaking ball in sight and had little hope of making contact when he expanded the zone. He’s been whiffing far less often in 2013 and has seen both his strikeout rate and BABIP improve as a result. His BABIP can only go so high with his ground ball-heavy approach, however, and his lack of a consistent walk habit means his OBP can also only go so high. 

    Power

    21/30

    Pence might be champing at the bit to get away from AT&T Park, as it’s been absolutely killing his power production this season. It certainly doesn’t help that his power is focused more up the middle of the field than it is to left or right field, though that funky swing of his does produce a surprisingly high number of liners down both lines. He’s frankly a hard guy to figure from a power standpoint, but there’s no question that he has more power than his numbers with the Giants say he does.

    Baserunning

    13/15

    Pence took a break from stealing bases in 2011 and 2012, but he is back on the habit now and is better than ever at it. He’s only been caught a couple times all season while setting a new career high for steals. Pence has also done solid work taking extra bases on balls in play without running into outs. With free agency looming, he’s picked a good time to become a weapon on the basepaths.

    Defense

    8/15

    Pence has a tendency to make things look pretty interesting in right field, in large part because he looks like a mutant when he only so much as runs in a straight line. He also doesn’t always read the ball off the bat well and can take some funky routes as a result. But while he’s always gotten grief for his defense, Pence really isn’t much worse than your typical right fielder. And this year, Ultimate Zone Rating has actually really liked what it's seen.

    Health

    10/10

    Pence has been on the DL once in his career, and that was in 2007 when he fractured his right wrist. The most serious thing he’s dealt with since then is offseason surgery to repair a sports hernia in 2011, but virtually nothing since then.

    Total

    70/100

    Pence can be frustrating to watch at the plate, and his defense can occasionally be a comedy routine. But he’s a fairly solid all-around talent, and he can be one of the game's better all-around players when things are clicking for him. Case in point: this season.

95. Wil Myers, RF, Tampa Bay Rays

15 of 109

    Gary A. Vasquez-USA TODAY Sports

    Hitting

    23/30

    You can already see what all the hype was about. Myers is advanced for such a young hitter, as he’s shown good patience and decent plate discipline. It also reflects well on him that he hasn’t been overwhelmed by major league breaking balls. The strikeouts are there, but Myers has also drawn a decent amount of walks and has shown off encouraging contact habits. It’s been mainly liners and grounders for him, and the whole field has been in play. He’s certainly enjoyed some good luck, but he does have the look of a hitter who’s going to make his own luck.

    Power

    20/30

    Myers’ power numbers don’t jump off the page, but there’s no doubt that the best is still to come. He has home run power to all fields, and there should be more line drives in the gaps coming from him in the future. He’s only slightly better than your average corner outfielder when it comes to power for now, but that will change.

    Baserunning

    8/15

    Myers doesn’t have blinding speed, but he does have enough athleticism to steal the occasional base. It also looks good on him that he’s been hard to throw out early on in his MLB career. All he has to do now is see about limiting those pesky outs at second base…

    Defense

    9/15

    Myers is a converted catcher who hasn’t really been given a chance to get comfortable at a specific spot in the outfield, but right field is where he’s played in the majors and where he belongs in the long run. He doesn’t have the look of a future Gold Glover, but both his athleticism and his strong arm should make him at least a slightly above-average defensive player.

    Health

    10/10

    Myers’ 2011 season was wrecked by bad health, but he’s been healthy and on a tear ever since then. For now, there’s nothing to worry about.

    Total

    70/100

    It’s only been a couple months since Myers got the call to the majors, but it’s plenty clear that he belongs. His bat is definitely major league-caliber, and we haven’t seen the best of his power, baserunning or defense. He could break out in 2014 like Manny Machado has this year.

94. Hisashi Iwakuma, SP, Seattle Mariners

16 of 109

    Stuff

    17/30

    Iwakuma’s arsenal is a pretty full deck, as he throws a four-seamer, sinker, slider, splitter and a very occasional curveball. His hard stuff has at best average velocity on a good day, as he tends to sit 90-91 with it. It’s a good thing his sinker has some quality movement, and his splitter is a plus pitch all the way. It has precisely the kind of late screwball action you want in a splitter. It’s the pitch that pushes Iwakuma’s arsenal from “average” to “above-average.”

    Command

    19/20

    Iwakuma boasts one of the lowest walk rates in the league, a gift of his supreme ability to pound the strike zone. He gets his hard stuff over the plate about as well as anyone in the league and is particularly good at hitting the outside corner against righty hitters.

    Hittability 

    8/15

    Thanks in large part to his splitter, Iwakuma gets more swings-and-misses than you might think he would. As a result, he has a strikeout rate that’s safely above average. He also keeps the ball on the ground pretty well…but not quite as well as he did last year, and he hasn’t totally shaken the home run problem that plagued him in 2012. 

    Workhorse

    17/25

    Iwakuma isn’t one to go too far over the 100-pitch threshold, so he absolutely needs to be efficient. Since he is, though, he’s been able to make it through six with regularity this year and has found himself completing seven innings about as often as not. The only thing he lacks here is a tried-and-true track record.

    Health

    10/10

    Iwakuma’s injury history is a clean slate. Nothing on it.

    Overall

    71/100

    Iwakuma’s a guy you rarely hear about, but he got on a roll upon being inserted into Seattle’s rotation last summer and hasn’t stopped yet. He doesn't have much besides his command, but his is plenty good enough to make him a top-tier pitcher.

93. Julio Teheran, SP, Atlanta Braves

17 of 109

    Dale Zanine-USA TODAY Sports

    Stuff

    22/30

    Teheran has two fastballs he can go to in a regular four-seamer and a sinker, but his four-seamer is his primary offering and it's a good one. It sits 92-93 but can go higher than that and has some solid life to boot. Teheran also boasts a slider, a curveball and an occasional changeup to lefty hitters. Both pitches are more above-average than plus, but that’ll do for a pair of breakers to go with a quality fastball.

    Command

    15/20

    Teheran’s command is advanced for a mere 22-year-old, as he’s throwing better than 45 percent of his pitches in the zone and also maintaining a walk rate around six percent. His fastball command is what stands out, as he has no trouble finding the zone with his heater and can work both sides of the plate effectively.

    Hittability 

    9/15

    Teheran has had little trouble racking up whiffs this year, as you would expect seeing as how he has three pitches that can draw whiffs in his four-seamer, slider and curveball. Yet his strikeout rate isn’t that far above average, and his low ground-ball rate has made him a magnet for hard-hit balls.

    Workhorse

    15/25

    This is Teheran’s first full year as a starter, and it’s progressing fairly well. He’s averaging better than six innings per start on less than 100 pitches per start. Once the leash comes off, he’s going to be a good one.

    Health

    10/10

    There’s nothing to see on Teheran’s injury track record. It’s about as clean as can be.

    Overall

    71/100

    Teheran didn’t get out of the gate very strong this year. But ever since the middle of May, he’s quietly been among the most dominant pitchers in the National League. 

92. Yan Gomes, C, Cleveland Indians

18 of 109

    Rick Osentoski-USA TODAY Sports

    Hitting

    14/20

    How do you come out of nowhere to quietly be one of the best hitting catchers in the league? Well, you can start by seeing more pitches at the plate and by swinging at the right ones. That means fewer hacks outside the strike zone. Then move on to handling off-speed offerings better and putting the ball in play more often. Such is the lesson of Gomes. The only things holding his score down here are his way-too-good BABIP on ground balls and the small sample size of plate appearances in which he's put up his ridiculous numbers. But while he will come back to earth, he definitely has some things figured out.

    Power

    19/25

    Gomes is a guy who only seems to care about barreling the ball up when he comes to the plate. He’s a little bit all-or-nothing as a result, as the ball is either going to be in the air when it leaves his bat or skidding across the infield. He’s been very productive when he has hit the air, however, showing off home run power to left field and some gap power to right-center. And despite the fact he was a power regression candidate heading into the second half, he hasn't slowed down. He hit for serious power at every minor league level, and now he's doing it in the majors.

    Baserunning

    6/10

    Yup, Gomes can run the bases too. He has some decent athleticism for a catcher, and he's put it to good use by going first to third about a third of the time he's had a chance. Just as important, the only out he's made on the basepaths came on a pickoff.

    Defense

    22/35

    Gomes wasn’t built up as a defensive gem as a prospect, but he’s quickly establishing a reputation as a guy you just don’t run on. He doesn’t have the quickest transfer from glove to hand, but he has a very strong, accurate arm that has helped him pick off a few runners and throw out roughly half of would-be base stealers. He still has work to do on the finer points of catching, such as keeping the ball in front of him and managing games, and the small sample size caveat obviously applies. But the skills are there, and Gomes has definitely put them to good use in 2013.

    Health

    10/10

    Gomes had to take a breather for a while during spring training when he came down with a hamstring strain. Before then, not much. Since then, nothing.

    Overall

    71/100

    Few catchers have had the kind of impact that Gomes has had in 2013, and he's done in in fewer than 75 games and 300 plate appearances. Over a full season's worth of games and plate appearances, he could be one of the game's best players if he keeps up what he's done in 2013. 

91. Jason Castro, C, Houston Astros

19 of 109

    Hitting

    15/20

    Castro has been caught up in Houston’s team-wide strikeout problem this year. He’s been whiffing a lot, especially on fastballs up and on breaking balls wherever. But that’s to be expected in what is really his first full major league season, and the Astros can live with it because Castro is a line-drive machine when he makes contact, one capable of using the whole field to boot. He's been among the best hitting catchers in MLB this year, and it's no accident.

    Power

    21/25

    Castro’s power production in 2013 has come as a surprise, as he didn’t hit for much power as a major leaguer before this year and didn’t hit for much in the high minors either. His power is no fluke, however, as he has more than enough home run pop to right field and enough to left field to pepper the left field wall with doubles. He’s also popped a couple opposite-field home runs this year, and only one (by my count) was a cheapie into Minute Maid Park's short left field porch.

    Baserunning

    8/10

    Castro is quietly quite the terrific baserunning catcher. He’s notched a couple of stolen bases, and has been able to go first to third with impressive regularity. He’s also been very good at avoiding outs, making him the rare catcher who’s actually a guy worth watching when he’s on base.

    Defense

    19/35

    Castro hasn’t had such an easy time keeping the ball in front of him this year, and he’s only been about average at controlling the running game. That might always be the case. He gets out of the crouch quickly enough and has a strong enough arm, but the transfer from glove to hand isn’t quick, and Castro oftentimes seems to take forever to cock his arm back for the throw. But being average at controlling the running game is good enough, and Castro’s receiving skills are plenty passable.

    Health

    8/10

    Castro has finally been able to stay healthy in 2013, but his right knee has taken a lot of damage. A torn ACL back in 2011 cost him the whole season, and last year he was sidelined for 30 games when he hurt his meniscus. And though it wasn't series, he banged up his right knee again earlier in September. 

    Overall

    71/100

    It was never a matter of talent with Castro; it was always a matter of him staying healthy. He’s been able to do that this year, and look what’s happening. He's been one of the best catchers in the game.

90. Andrelton Simmons, SS, Atlanta Braves

20 of 109

    USA TODAY Sports

    Hitting

    8/20

    Simmons is a work in progress at the plate. He has made an effort to be more patient in 2013, but it hasn’t paid off in the form of a higher walk rate. And while the bright side is that he can make contact with anything, he wastes his time with too many fly balls. He’s a guy who needs to keep it simple with ground balls and line drives if he wants to save himself from below-average territory.

    Power

    13/20

    Simmons isn’t as powerful as he seems to think he is, but he does have solid home run pop to left field and doubles and triples power to right-center field. If he places an emphasis on exploiting the latter more often, he’s going to be more dangerous than he already is.

    Baserunning

    10/20

    As athletic as Simmons is, he’s not much of a base stealer. He’s tried, but catchers have taught him a few lessons about how good they are in the major leagues. One wonders if that has something to do with Simmons’ generally tentative approach to running the bases. He has himself a learning curve to tackle.

    Defense

    30/30

    There’s no word in the tongues of men that can adequately describe how good Simmons is on defense. With great instincts, unreal range, soft hands and a strong arm, he’s the best defensive shortstop in baseball—and maybe the best defensive player of any kind in the majors, period. Next time he does something awesome while you're on Twitter, get in on the hashtag fun: #Andrelted.

    Health

    10/10

    Simmons’ rookie year was halted for a while by a broken hand, but broken bones in young players have a tendency to heal, and Simmons' health has hardly been bothered ever since.

    Overall

    71/100

    Simmons may be a work in progress on the offensive side of the ball, but there’s some promise there. In the meantime, everyone is advised to bask in his defensive glory.

89. Trevor Rosenthal, RP, St. Louis Cardinals

21 of 109

    Scott Kane-USA TODAY Sports

    Stuff

    24/25

    Rosenthal relies heavily on his four-seamer, throwing it roughly 75 percent of the time. Rightfully so, as it sits at 98 and can touch triples digits. But that’s not all Rosenthal has. He also has a plus changeup and a plus curveball. The fact that he has three legit plus pitches makes him decidedly unique among his fellow relievers, and he would have a perfect score here if he used his curveball as often as he uses his changeup. But alas, he doesn’t. His hook only makes occasional appearances.

    Command

    13/15

    Rosenthal pounds the strike zone more consistently than most relievers, so it’s not surprising to see him there with a walk rate in the 7 percent range. What’s cool about him is that he doesn’t just try to do the usual reliever thing of throwing his fastball by hitters. He can spot it—one of more than a couple hints that, yes, he could and perhaps should be starting.

    Hittability

    17/20

    Rosenthal gets about as many whiffs as you’d expect for a guy with a high-90s fastball and two plus secondary pitches, and his strikeout rate is just south of elite territory in the mid 30s. That’s obviously still quite good, and it should also be noted that Rosenthal keeps the ball on the ground pretty well. There’s no escaping the notion that his opponents' batting average should be lower than it is.

    Reliability

    8/15

    This is Rosenthal’s first year as a full-time reliever. You’d think he’d be among the most dominant shutdown artists in the game with his stuff and his command, but he actually hasn’t had that many shutdowns and has committed his share of meltdowns. That’s largely a result of him being victimized by BABIP, but there’s a limit to how much we can apologize for Rosenthal given his lack of a track record.

    Health

    10/10

    Rosenthal’s injury history is currently a clean slate. His million-dollar arm is in mint condition.

    Overall

    72/85

    Rosenthal hasn't quite been a "game over" kind of guy in 2013, but he has an overpowering arsenal of pitches, a good idea where to put them and a very strong ability to miss bats. He may not be a closer, but he's certainly one of baseball's elite relievers.

88. Glen Perkins, RP, Minnesota Twins

22 of 109

    Stuff

    21/25

    Perkins is a fastball-slider reliever, but he throws more than just one fastball. He uses his four-seamer close to half the time but works in a two-seamer about 20 percent of the time. His hard stuff sits 94-96 with some real electricity, and his slider is one of the best lefty sliders in the business. He may not quite have the high-90s capacity that some elite relievers have, but there’s no denying Perkins’ stuff is filthy.

    Command

    14/15

    Command is Perkins’ main calling card. He walked less than 6 percent of the batters he faced last year and hasn’t seen his walk rate spike in 2013. He’s not quite among the league’s elite walk suppressors, but he does throw roughly half his pitches in the strike zone and is perfectly capable of spotting his fastball to both lefties and righties.

    Hittability

    14/20

    Perkins’ slider doesn’t get quite enough whiffs to push his swinging-strike rate into elite territory, so it’s no surprise that he’s not quite an elite strikeout artist. He’s also been inducing fewer and fewer ground balls over the last couple seasons, with his ground-ball rate dipping below 40 percent this year. The strikeouts are fine, but that's not the most encouraging trend.

    Reliability

    14/15

    Perkins has become more of a sure thing in each of the last three years. He committed 12 meltdowns in 2011, seven last year and likely won’t even touch that number in 2013. This would be him establishing himself as a legit closer and, to slightly less fanfare, a legit win probability merchant.

    Health

    9/10

    Apart from a minor ribcage issue back in May, Perkins has managed to stay healthy in 2013. But his injury history isn’t the cleanest, as he has past struggles with both shoulder and elbow problems in it. One worries about those cropping up again.

    Overall

    72/85

    Perkins doesn’t get that many save chances pitching for the Twins, but he’s a better closer than most of the guys who get more attention than he does. He has outstanding stuff, terrific command and, as a bonus, he knows what FIP is!

87. Jeff Samardzija, SP, Chicago Cubs

23 of 109

    Stuff

    26/30

    With stuff like his, it’s no wonder Samardzija chose baseball over football. He has a legit five-pitch arsenal that includes a four-seamer, sinker, slider, splitter and cutter. His four-seamer and sinker sit 95-96 with some electric life, and Samardzija’s slider and splitter are both plus pitches that can make hitters look silly. His cutter is just OK, but it works as a pitch to show hitters to keep them thinking.

    Command

    7/20

    Samardzija was able to maintain a respectable walk rate in 2012, but not in 2013. He’s walking around nine percentage of the hitters he faces, with a primary symptom being fewer swings out of the zone. But Samardzija’s command issues don’t end there, as he can still struggle with his fastball command within the strike zone. He can get by OK now because he has velocity and movement, but it’s something to keep an eye on as he gets older and invariably begins to lose some zip.

    Hittability 

    12/15

    Samardzija’s swinging-strike rate is not as astronomical as it was last year, when it finished the season at 12.1 percent. Yet he’s still getting more swings-and-misses than the typical starter, and he’s still maintaining a strikeout rate better than that of an average starter. And while he’s still being touched up for home runs, an increased ground-ball rate is helping to even things out. 

    Workhorse

    17/25

    Samardzija worked over 170 innings in his first full year as a starter last year, averaging just over six innings and just about 100 pitches per start. He’s throwing more pitches per start this year, but hasn’t seen a huge uptick in innings to go along with it. That’s about what you’d expect seeing as how Samardzija hasn’t been as efficient.

    Health

    10/10

    Samardzija has dealt with exactly zero injuries throughout his pro baseball career. It’s almost like his body is built for football or something.

    Overall

    72/100

    Samardzija’s ERA has taken a step back this year, but that's misleading. His control hasn’t been as good, but the strikeouts are still there and there’s been some bad luck at work. He's still a dangerous pitcher.

86. Corey Kluber, SP, Cleveland Indians

24 of 109

    Stuff

    23/30

    Kluber’s a sinker-slider guy, but not just another sinker-slider guy. Kluber's arsenal is a little more complex. He works mainly off his two-seamer, which sits 93-94 with killer movement, but also works in a cutter and a changeup to go along with his slider. His cutter goes at 90 miles per hour and can really get in on lefties, and his slider and changeup are both quality pitches as well. His changeup really falls off the table and his slider is a big breaker. All told, this is one of the better arsenals out there that nobody talks about.

    Command

    14/20

    In addition to stuff, Kluber has very good command. He doesn’t pound the zone that much more than the average pitcher, but he’s walking roughly five percent of the batters he’s facing. The one complaint to be made is that he’ll leave a few too many hard ones over the plate against righty hitters, who notably haven’t been much worse against him than lefties.

    Hittability 

    11/15

    Kluber’s changeup, slider and cutter (surprisingly) are all legit swing-and-miss pitches, so it’s not a shocker that he has an easily above-average swinging-strike rate and a strikeout rate in the 20s. He also generates more ground balls than the average starter. But once again, there’s a complaint: Thanks to that tendency to leave balls up, he hasn’t kicked the home run habit that plagued him in 2012.

    Workhorse

    14/25

    This is Kluber’s first full year as a starter, so it basically goes without saying that he’s a work in progress. He hasn’t been a lock for 100 pitches when he takes the mound, but the bright side is that he’s been able to make it through six easily enough and has found himself pitching in the seventh about half the time.

    Health

    10/10

    It was all going just fine until Kluber sprained his finger and landed on the DL in early August. That’s not exactly a career-threatening injury, however.

    Overall

    72/100

    Is Corey Kluber really this good? Well, let's put it this way: he's been one of 2013's most underrated and overlooked pitchers, and the things that made that possible are for real. Put him on your radar for 2014 if you haven't already.

85. Ervin Santana, SP, Kansas City Royals

25 of 109

    Stuff

    18/30

    Santana is as much a fastball-slider guy as he’s even been, but there's a twist this year. He’s switching things up between a regular four-seamer and a two-seamer like never before, and both are quality pitches with solid velocity (92-94) and good movement. His slider is still his moneymaker, however, and it still ranks as one of the better sliders in the league.

    Command

    15/20

    Santana’s never had a bad walk problem, but he was only ever about average at limiting them. It’s been a different story this year, as Santana has maintained a walk rate well below the league average. It’s not by accident either, as he’s throwing close to 50 percent of his pitches in the zone and about 60 percent of his heaters in the zone. The Royals have done a fine job of sharpening him up.

    Hittability 

    9/15

    Santana’s strike-throwing ways have put him in a position to throw more sliders this year, and the extra are helping him maintain the highest swinging-strike percentage he’s had since 2008. Not so coincidentally, he has his strikeout rate above the league average and has also benefited from a much-improved ground-ball rate. If only he didn’t still have issues with the long ball…

    Workhorse

    20/25

    Santana topped 220 innings in both 2010 and 2011 before regressing in a big way last year, but he's back to gobbling up innings in 2013—as you would expect for a guy who’s cut down on his walks while also getting more hitters out via strikeouts and ground balls. Santana going at least six innings has become one of the best bets in the game, and he’s also pitched into the seventh with regularity.

    Health

    10/10

    Santana had all sorts of arm scares in 2009, but he's had virtually nothing since then. His arm and shoulder are fine.

    Overall

    72/100

    There’s no understating what a huge bounce-back year 2013 has been for Santana. He’s not among the league’s more dominant starters, but he has quietly been among the league’s more dependable starters.

84. Francisco Liriano, SP, Pittsburgh Pirates

26 of 109

    Stuff

    25/30

    Liriano’s only a three-pitch pitcher with a sinker, changeup and slider to go to, but each of these three pitches has been absolutely electric in 2013. Liriano’s sinker sits 93-94 with some life that makes it look faster than that. His slider hasn’t looked this good since earlier in his career when he was overpowering every hitter in his path, and the increased trust he’s shown in his changeup this season isn’t misplaced. There’s not a lot of velocity differential between it and Liriano’s hard stuff, but his changeup appears to just stop in mid-air just before it gets to home plate.

    Command

    8/20

    The Pirates have to live with a few walks when Liriano takes the mound, as his walk rate is well above the league average for starters and has been all season. That’s life when you throw fewer than 40 percent of your pitches in the strike zone. However, Liriano’s fastball command is hardly disastrous, and part of the reason he hasn’t been living in the zone is because he’s been getting ahead more often with first-pitch strikes.

    Hittability 

    14/15

    Liriano has two elite swing-and-miss pitches in his slider and changeup, so it’s not a shock to see him with a huge swinging-strike percentage once again. That’s feeding a strikeout rate in the mid-20s, and this is also a season in which Liriano’s ground-ball percentage is over 50 percent. Extra-base hits off him have been hard to come by.

    Workhorse

    17/25

    Somewhat amazingly, Liriano has never pitched 200 innings in his career. He won’t get there this year either, and his high-strikeout, high-walk ways put a natural cap on his workload potential. But he has been able to give the Pirates between 95 and 110 pitches more often than not, working six innings more often than not. That’ll do.

    Health

    8/10

    Liriano has Tommy John surgery in his history, not to mention assorted other arm and shoulder injuries. His body has a few miles on it. 

    Overall

    72/100

    Should we call it a comeback? Whatever it is, Liriano has been a revelation in Pittsburgh this season, and it looks for real based on appearances and the numbers.

83. Gio Gonzalez, SP, Washington Nationals

27 of 109

    Daniel Shirey-USA TODAY Sports

    Stuff

    23/30

    Gonzalez has a four-seamer and a sinker that both sit in the 92-94 range, and his sinker has some impressive lateral movement on it. He also has a solid changeup that he breaks out against right-handed batters, but his best pitch is and always has been his curveball. It’s up there among the best lefty curveballs in the game, with hard, two-plane break that has frozen many knees over the years.

    Command

    8/20

    Gonzalez doesn’t walk the ballpark like he used to, but he still walks more hitters than your average starter and is not one who specializes in pounding the zone. Only about 40 percent of his pitches find the zone, and this year he hasn’t been able to help himself by putting as many of his hooks in the zone.

    Hittability 

    12/15

    One thing that hasn’t changed much this year for Gonzalez is his swinging-strike rate. But his strikeout rate has changed, and not for the better. It’s dropped from over 25 percent last year to about 24 percent. That’s obviously still very good, but it's not elite, and Gonzalez hasn't induced as many ground balls, either. Related: He’s given up more homers.

    Workhorse

    19/25

    Gonzalez fell just a couple outs shy of what would have been his third straight season of 200 innings last year, but we’ll give it to him. However, 200 innings is about his limit, as he walks too many and strikes out too many to be an efficient innings eater.

    Health

    10/10

    There’s very little in Gonzalez’s track record that warrants concern, as he has yet to spend time on the DL and has dealt with absolutely no injuries over the last two years.

    Overall

    72/100

    This season hasn’t been the roaring success for Gonzalez that the 2012 season was, but he still has a place among the top pitchers in the league.

82. Brian McCann, C, Atlanta Braves

28 of 109

    Scott Cunningham/Getty Images

    Hitting

    16/20

    McCann has looked like a new man at the plate after struggling mightily in 2012. His approach hasn’t changed that much, as he still sees his share of pitches while exercising a solid understanding of the strike zone. He walks more often than the average catcher, and strikes out less often. The main difference this year is that McCann is racking up tons of line drives, and the only reason they haven’t helped his BABIP as much as they should have is because a few too many of them have been directly at the right fielder. Turn those into hits, and McCann is having a typical McCann season.

    Power

    22/25

    McCann’s power was hardly seen at all in 2012 as he tried to play through a bad shoulder. He got that shoulder corrected over the offseason, and his power has returned with a vengeance. The huge HR/FB rate he had in the first half has been corrected in the second half, but he's still kept the homers coming. The only other catcher who's been on McCann's level in terms of power this year is that one bear-looking teammate of his (who's obviously been better).

    Baserunning

    2/10

    Most catchers are station-to-station baserunners, but McCann is more station-to-station than most. He hasn’t bothered trying to go first to third this year. Or second to home. And it basically takes a home run to get him in from first base. But hey, at least he’s avoided outs.

    Defense

    25/35

    McCann still has the goods behind the plate. He’s never been outstanding at controlling the running game, but he is quick enough out of the crouch with just enough arm strength to be perfectly average. He also keeps the ball in front of him well, calls a good game and is one of the better receivers out there. His reputation as a top-tier pitch framer is well deserved.

    Health

    7/10

    McCann didn’t play until May this year due to his recovery from offseason shoulder surgery. He’s looked terrific ever since, but his injury history is downright scary. He doesn’t often go on the DL, but McCann has certainly had seasons in which he’s been hurt pretty much constantly. At with his 30th birthday due up, odds are we haven’t seen the last of those.

    Overall

    72/100

    I get the sense that McCann is taken for granted on the national landscape. He obviously shouldn't be if that's the case, as he's one of the best hitting catchers in the business and a steady presence behind the plate.

81. Matt Kemp, CF, Los Angeles Dodgers

29 of 109

    Hitting

    19/20

    We know what the real Matt Kemp looks like, and the real Kemp looks nothing like the Matt Kemp who has showed up in 2013. The real Kemp certainly isn’t averse to expanding the zone and will indeed strike out his fair share. But the real Kemp also has astonishing plate coverage and can crush virtually anything. While 2013 is the season that matters most with this project, Kemp gets the benefit of the doubt because of how clear it is that his health (more on that in a moment) is at the root of his problems.

    Power

    25/25

    Another thing the real Matt Kemp has in spades is power. His power goes right back up the middle, and he has more than enough raw pop to send the ball soaring over the center field fence. He also doesn’t have much trouble hitting screamers into the outfield that put the center fielder on his horse to catch up. Fully healthy, he's one of the better power hitters in the league, and is certainly one of the best power-hitting center fielders in the league.

    Baserunning

    15/20

    Kemp career success rate on stolen bases is only 75 percent, and he’s been known to push his luck a bit too much and run into outs on the basepaths. However, he's a perfect nine-for-nine in steals when he's been able to play this season, and it's generally easy to live with the outs because of how many extra-bases he takes. He's not your typical station-to-station middle-of-the-order hitter.

    Defense

    10/25

    Regardless of his health, defense is easily the weakest part of Kemp’s game. He has plenty of athleticism, and he does make the occasional highlight-reel play, but he also takes questionable routes and just doesn’t get to as many balls as most center fielders. The best thing he has going for him is his arm, which is a weapon for most other center fielders to envy.

    Health

    3/10

    The injury bug just loves the taste of Matt Kemp. Hamstring strains derailed him at the start of 2012, and then, later in the year, he hurt his shoulder bad enough to require surgery over the offseason. He was clearly hampered by that in the early portion of the season and subsequently found himself on the DL on three separate occasions with three separate injuries. His health is an absolute wreck, and there’s some long-term doubt built in with him due to the state of his surgically repaired shoulder. 

    Total

    72/100

    The 2013 season has been even more of a lost season for Kemp than 2012 was. He hasn't been close to 100-percent healthy all year, and hasn't looked like himself when he's been healthy enough to play. Regarding his health, one has no choice but to have doubts. But if a full offseason's worth of rest proves to be just what the doctor ordered, he could be a monster once again in 2014.

80. David Ortiz, DH, Boston Red Sox

30 of 109

    Noah K. Murray-USA TODAY Sports

    Hitting

    29/30

    How do you become a yearly candidate for a .300 average and .400 on-base percentage? In Ortiz’s case, it’s simple. He’s always been one to work counts, and he has a much better eye than the average player. When it comes to hitting, the whole field is in play when Ortiz is at the plate, and he makes enough hard contact on his ground balls to beat the shift on a consistent basis. The catch this year is that he hasn’t maintained the effectiveness that he had against southpaws in 2011 and 2012, but he's still the best pure hitter the DH position has to offer.

    Power

    32/35

    Anything in the air off of Ortiz’s bat has a good chance to go, and he certainly has power to all fields. And while he is indeed a good fit for Fenway Park with the Green Monster looming in left field, he’s actually hit for more power on the road both in 2013 and throughout his whole career. He’s up there among the best power hitters in the game…though he’s not quite on the next guy's level.

    Baserunning

    4/10

    Ortiz’s power hasn’t been quite as explosive in 2013 as it was in 2012. Maybe that explains the career high for stolen bases this year. There’s not much to speak of outside of those, as Big Papi is definitely a station-to-station guy. He can get moving pretty well when he has to, but he hasn’t been pushing himself on the basepaths more than necessary this year. And he shouldn’t, given that that's how he hurt his Achilles last year. 

    Health

    7/10

    The Achilles injury that ended Ortiz’s 2012 season and delayed his return to action in 2013 hasn’t cropped up, but there are times when he still seems to be favoring the leg/foot in question. Aside from that, he’s got a body with a lot of miles on it and it’s just not fair to expect him to be 100 percent healthy at any given moment.

    Total

    72/85

    Left for dead a few years ago, Big Papi provides seemingly daily reminders that he’s still an elite hitter. If hitting were the only thing that mattered for all position players, he’d be up there among the game’s very best.

79. Mike Minor, SP, Atlanta Braves

31 of 109

    Howard Smith-USA TODAY Sports

    Stuff

    19/30

    Minor works off a four-seam fastball that’s more impressive than its velocity (90-91) would lead you to believe. It may not move fast, but it has good tailing action that makes it a tough customer. He rounds out his arsenal with a changeup, curveball and cutter. None of the three is particularly overpowering, but they have the same kind of sneaky-good movement that Minor’s fastball has.

    Command

    15/20

    Minor’s command was all over the place before the All-Star break in 2012, but he cleaned up his act down the stretch and has kept up the good work in 2013. His walk rate is well below the league average in the 5.0-6.0 range, and he’s improved on both his fastball command and, not so coincidentally, his first-pitch strike percentage. In short: impressive work, Mr. Minor.

    Hittability 

    11/15

    Minor wasn’t a big swing-and-miss guy last year, but that’s changed this year as he’s gotten ahead more often. He’s been able to expand the zone more often, and hitters have obliged him by swinging and coming up empty. As a result, his strikeout rate has moved above 20 percent. All he needs to do now is see about a ground-ball habit.

    Workhorse

    17/25

    Minor fell just short of 180 innings in 2012 when he averaged exactly six innings and 95 pitches per start. His command has bought him a few extra pitches and a few extra innings this year, making him a strong bet to pitch into the seventh. He’s not an elite workhorse yet, but he’s getting there.

    Health

    10/10

    Nothing to see here. The Internet machine reports that Minor is in good health and always has been.

    Overall

    72/100

    Minor was a well-kept secret down the stretch in 2012. So far as I can tell, he’s still a well-kept secret in 2013. Over the last calendar year, he’s been an ace.

78. Shelby Miller, SP, St. Louis Cardinals

32 of 109

    Dilip Vishwanat/Getty Images

    Stuff

    21/30

    Miller’s arsenal has one key weakness right now, and that’s lack of depth. He has a changeup, a cutter and a sinker, but they’re afterthoughts. Roughly 70 percent of his pitches are four-seamers. Another 20ish percent are curveballs. The good news is that his heater sits 94-95 and has some serious late movement on it. And while his curveball’s not a cartoon breaking ball in the spirit of Adam Wainwright’s hook, it does have some sharp break that makes it a plus pitch. 

    Command

    15/20

    Miller is maintaining a walk rate slightly better than league average in the low seven percent neighborhood, but that doesn’t give his command proper justice. He’s one of the rare ones who throws roughly 50 percent of his pitches in the strike zone, and when he’s on he’s spotting his plus fastball with the savvy of a 10-year veteran. 

    Hittability 

    13/15

    Miller is more likely to get whiffs on his fastball than he is on his curveball, which is generally not how these things work. Regardless, he gets plenty more swings and misses than the average starter and is maintaining a strikeout rate around 25 percent. His next conquest needs to be keeping the ball on the ground better, as he could definitely stand to cut down on the home runs.

    Workhorse

    13/25

    This is the one area where Miller is severely lacking, though not really through his own doing. The Cardinals have kept him on a short leash, keeping his pitch count tied closely to the century mark. As a result, starts longer than six innings have been a relative rarity for him. The workhorse department is one in which he’ll have much to prove come 2014.

    Health

    10/10

    Miller’s injury history isn’t entirely spotless, but there’s nothing in it that warrants less than a perfect score here. Or even a mention, for that matter.

    Overall

    72/100

    Miller needs to develop a reliable third pitch, but aside from that all he really needs is for his leash to be loosened. He’s used his rookie year to show why he was so highly thought of as a prospect.

77. Koji Uehara, RP, Boston Red Sox

33 of 109

    Winslow Townson/Getty Images

    Stuff

    17/25

    You’re going to get one or the other when Uehara is on the mound, as he basically splits his four-seamer and splitter usage right down the middle at 45 percent each. His fastball has below-average velocity at 89-90, but it does have some solid tailing action. It may not be a plus pitch, but his splitter sure is. It may only go 81-82, but its killer movement makes it one of the game’s top swing-and-miss offerings.

    Command

    15/15

    Uehara is one of the rare relievers who can put the ball precisely where he wants it almost every single time. He owns a career walk rate that’s a shade under 4 percent, and he’s sticking in that same general neighborhood this year. He may have had an other-worldly 2.3 walk rate last year, but this year he’s actually been throwing more pitches in the strike zone. He may have subpar fastball, but he’s not afraid to go right at hitters with it.

    Hittability

    19/20

    It’s typically the guys with the blistering fastballs and sharp, biting sliders who lead the relieving gentry in swinging-strike percentage. But in 2013, Uehara’s been at the top of the charts. He gets a ton of swings-and-misses on his splitter, and amazingly gets them on his heater too. The result is one of the highest strikeout rates in the league. The catch is that he can be taken for a ride when he makes mistakes.

    Reliability

    15/15

    Uehara has been a godsend for Boston’s bullpen, especially ever since taking over the ninth inning from Joel Hanrahan and Andrew Bailey. It turns out that high-strikeout, low-walk guys in the ninth inning are a good thing, and Uehara has been so dominant that he’s found himself atop the charts in key win probability stays like WPA and WPA/LI. It’s not unprecedented either, as Uehara has been a win probability merchant for some time now. He’s a “proven closer” who just so happens to be late to the whole closing thing.

    Health

    7/10

    Uehara’s medical track record is pretty bumpy. He’s had two lengthy DL stints with elbow injuries and another with a bad shoulder just last year. He’s been fine in 2013, but his track record obviously makes it tough to forecast another healthy season. Especially not at his age.

    Overall

    73/85

    Armed with a killer splitter, excellent control and an ability to miss bats, Uehara has graduated from criminally underrated reliever to dominant closer in 2013.

76. Gerrit Cole, SP, Pittsburgh Pirates

34 of 109

    Benny Sieu-USA TODAY Sports

    Stuff

    25/30

    Cole’s repertoire is an impressive one. He throws both a four-seamer and a two-seamer, and we all know about his velocity. He sits right at 97 miles per hour and can get up above triple digits. He rounds things out with a slider, curveball and changeup, but the slider is the only pitch of the three he’s really been comfortable using in 2013, and it’s really more of a cutter than a slider. His secondary stuff in general has been inconsistent, otherwise he'd have a near-perfect score here.

    Command

    14/20

    Cole had some issues with his command in the minors before he got the call to the majors, but he’s left those issues at the door. He’s keeping his walk percentage well below the league average and is pounding the zone consistently with his hard stuff, and generally at the bottom of the zone. The one gripe I have is that he’s left too many hard ones up to lefty hitters, which is something for him to work on.

    Hittability 

    9/15

    Cole’s arm is a live one, but for a while there he wasn't getting as many whiffs as he should have been. That changed in late July. Ever since whiffing eight Marlins on July 28, Cole has been striking out hitters at about the rate that he should be. It's a small sample size, sure, but definitely an encouraging one. Oh, and by the way, Cole keeps the ball on the ground well too.

    Workhorse

    15/25

    This is an area where Cole is obviously a work in progress. The Pirates have kept close tabs on him, limiting him to around 90 pitches per start. He’s been able to get through six often with that allotment, however, so things should only be better when his leash is loosened in 2014.

    Health

    10/10

    There’s nothing to report here. Cole’s million-dollar arm is in fine shape.

    Overall

    73/100

    It was easy to nitpick Cole's early performances, but he's really turned on the jets over the last several weeks and made it clear that he can thrive in the big leagues. The former No. 1 overall pick could be the Matt Harvey of 2014.

75. Justin Masterson, SP, Cleveland Indians

35 of 109

    Stuff

    20/30

    Masterson is baseball’s preeminent fastball-slider pitcher. He throws both a sinker and four-seamer, with the sinker serving a purpose by moving and the four-seamer serving a purpose by moving fast. He sits 94-95 with it and occasionally gets higher than that. Both hard pitches are above average, but his slider is the pitch that takes the cake. It goes in the mid-80s and has late two-plane break. Masterson’s arsenal may be shallow, but it’s effective.

    Command

    8/20

    Walks have come with the territory with Masterson over the last two seasons, as you would expect given the movement on his stuff and the awkwardness of his delivery. His walk rate was close to 10 percent in 2012 and has been hanging steady around nine percent this year. He’s also been throwing fewer pitches in the strike zone, missing often off the outside edge against lefty hitters.

    Hittability 

    13/15

    Masterson’s slider is a swing-and-miss pitch, but he also gets more whiffs on his sinker than your typical sinkerballer. His stuff has been particularly nasty this year, as he’s drawing more whiffs and has pushed his strikeout rate into above-average territory. On top of that, he’s still among the game’s elite ground-ball artists.

    Workhorse

    22/25

    Masterson has topped 200 innings in each of the last two years and he would have done so again this year had it not been for the injury he suffered in early September. He’s a lock for over 100 pitches when he takes the hill, and this year he was averaging right around seven innings per start.

    Health

    10/10

    Masterson had to have shoulder surgery after the 2011 season…but it was on his left shoulder. His more recent injury scare involves an oblique strain that has thrown the end of his season for a loop. But since he doesn't have a history with such injuries, we'll let it slide.

    Overall

    73/100

    When innings-eating ground-ball artists start racking up strikeouts, one has no choice but to tip one’s cap. Masterson is well deserving of a place in the top 25 among starting pitchers.

74. Clay Buchholz, SP, Boston Red Sox

36 of 109

    Stuff

    26/30

    Stuff has never been a problem with Buchholz. He has a deep repertoire that sees him split his time between a four-seamer, two-seamer, curveball, changeup, cutter and a very occasional splitter. His fastball and two-seamer both sit 92-94 and the latter can be nasty enough to draw cheating allegationsHis curveball is a plus pitch, and his changeup moves about a dozen miles per hour slower than his hard stuff. It gets a lot of hitters leaning on their front foot.

    Command

    8/20

    Walks come with the territory with Buchholz. His walk rate was up around nine percent before his shoulder acted up on him, and it was no fluke given that he was throwing fewer pitches in the strike zone than the average starter. Part of his problem is that his hard stuff can be too electric to control, and he doesn’t help himself by being basically incapable of throwing his changeup in the strike zone.

    Hittability 

    14/15

    Buchholz was a disappointing strikeout artist earlier in his career, but he’s finally found his stride in that department with a strikeout rate in the mid-20s. As a bonus, his ground-ball rate is up around 50 percent. When you do these things, you get an opponent batting average under the Mendoza line.

    Workhorse

    18/25

    Buchholz set a new career high in innings last season and appeared well on his way to setting a new career high when he was healthy earlier in the summer. He was averaging seven innings on close to 105 pitches per start. That’s elite territory, but we obviously can’t put Buchholz there given his past reputation and…well the discussion that’s due up next.

    Health

    7/10

    If it’s not one thing with Buchholz, it’s another thing. A thigh injury slowed his 2010 season, a stress fracture in his back wiped out his 2011 season, he spent a few weeks on the DL with an illness in 2012, and he's been sidelined for a long while with bursitis in his shoulder this year. 

    Overall

    73/100

    Buchholz broke through with a 2.33 ERA in 2010, but he didn’t show how good he might be. He didn’t do that until earlier this year when he was mowing his way through the American League. If he ever stays healthy, watch out.

73. Jean Segura, SS, Milwaukee Brewers

37 of 109

    Mike McGinnis/Getty Images

    Hitting

    15/20

    Segura’s not a patient hitter. He goes up to the plate looking to hack away, and he will expand the strike zone if he is so inclined. But he’s very good at making contact when he does go outside the zone, and he's a quality contact hitter in general. Most impressive of all, however, is his Derek Jeter-like ability to pepper right field with line drives. There's been some overachieving going on thanks to his high BABIP on ground balls, but Segura definitely has the look of a quality hitter.

    Power

    12/20

    Segura’s power production has been a surprise this year, and his power hasn’t exactly come cheap. He has impressive pop up the middle of the field, which is where a good chunk of his long balls have gone over the fence. The catch is that he’s benefited greatly from Miller Park, a known hitter’s haven. Realistically, his power isn’t this good.

    Baserunning

    18/20

    Segura’s very much a stolen-base threat in addition to a power threat. He’s been piling up the thefts in his first full season in the big leagues. He also does the little things on the basepaths well, with only a couple outs to show for quite a few extra bases taken. The one catch is that his stolen-base efficiency needs some work, as he's in the double digits in terms of being caught.

    Defense

    18/30

    Segura was originally a second baseman in the minors. It was his arm strength that got him moved to shortstop, and it’s still his best asset. But despite his athleticism, his range is really just OK. He passes the eye test, but he doesn’t make an excess of plays that other shortstops can’t make. That's in part because of how he doesn't always read the ball off the bat well.

    Health

    10/10

    Segura has dealt with some minor injury issues in his first full year as a big leaguer, but he's only missed a couple games due to injury, and nothing he's dealt with gives one pause. He should be OK.

    Overall

    73/100

    The Brewers traded two months of Zack Greinke for Segura. It turns out that they traded for a shortstop who can hit, hit for power, run the bases and play some solid defense. Well done, Doug Melvin.

72. James Shields, SP, Kansas City Royals

38 of 109

    Leon Halip/Getty Images

    Stuff

    19/30

    Among the pitches Shields throws at least 10 percent of the time are a four-seamer, a sinker, a curveball, a changeup and a cutter. That makes his arsenal a deep one, and he does have solid velocity with both his four-seamer and sinker sitting in the 92-93 range. Yet aside from the solid velocity, nothing really wows you until you get to Shields’ changeup. It’s been a dandy for a while now and is still among the game’s best out pitches.

    Command

    13/20

    Command has long been Shields’ main calling card, but he’s been issuing a few more free passes in 2013 than he usually does. His walk rate this year has been right around the league average for starters. Yet he’s actually been throwing more pitches in the strike zone this year than he did in 2012, and we know from Shields’ track record that he’s better than a merely league-average walk guy.

    Hittability 

    7/15

    One thing that hasn’t helped Shields both on the walk front and the hittability front is the fact that he’s been getting fewer swings out of the strike zone. That's naturally meant fewer whiffs for him. To boot, he’s seen his ground-ball rate go from being well over 50 percent last year to the low 40s this year. The bright side is that he’s cut down on home runs.

    Workhorse

    24/25

    Shields has logged at least 200 innings every year since 2007 and at least 220 the last two years. He’s headed in that direction once again in 2013, and it's been business as usual on a start-by-start basis. He was good for seven innings and 110 pitches when he took the ball with Tampa Bay. Same old story in 2013 with Kansas City.

    Health

    10/10

    Shields had surgery on his shoulder way back when he was a minor leaguer in 2002. Since then, a whole lot of nothing has happened to his health.

    Overall

    73/100

    Looking for a dependable starter who can eat innings and keep runs off the board? You’re looking for James Shields.

71. Doug Fister, SP, Detroit Tigers

39 of 109

    Gregory Shamus/Getty Images

    Stuff

    18/30

    Fister works primarily off a sinker, and it’s good one. It doesn’t have much velocity, as it sits around 89-90, but coming from Fister’s 6’8” frame it can seem like it’s falling out of the sky. He also has a four-seamer, cutter, splitter and curveball to turn to, with the last of those being the only one that really stands out as being particularly nasty. 

    Command

    18/20

    Fister is well established as one of the league’s top control artists. His career walk rate is under five percent, and he’s occupying that territory once again in 2013. Well over half of his sinkers find the strike zone, and he keeps them right where they should be: away from the middle of the plate.

    Hittability 

    8/15

    Only Fister’s curve is a swing-and-miss pitch, and he doesn’t have much use for swings and misses in general. He gets fewer of those than the average pitcher and is only about an average strikeout artist. He is, however, a terrific ground-ball artist with a GB% well over 50 this year.

    Workhorse

    19/25

    Fister has one 200-inning season to his name, and he should be able to cross the threshold again in 2013. He’s a model of efficiency on good days—those would be the ones in which he’s doing his usual thing with walks and ground balls—and is plenty good for 100 or so pitches and six innings. He’s also found himself pitching into the seventh more often than not this year.

    Health

    10/10

    Fister had a hard time with injuries in 2012, twice landing on the DL with abdominal strains. But he’s been fine in 2013 and has only had to go to the DL once with an arm/shoulder injury, and it wasn’t a serious one. 

    Overall

    73/100

    Not walking guys and racking up a ton of ground balls isn’t sexy, but Fister will vouch that it’s effective.

70. Jayson Werth, RF, Washington Nationals

40 of 109

    Hitting

    29/30

    Werth is among the league’s most patient hitters, and he’s able to make good use out of that patience via good plate discipline. He has no reservations about taking a walk. But Werth has been a bit more aggressive this year than he usually is, and he’s racked up some extra strikeouts because of that. The bright side is that he’s been a line-drive machine who has made good use of the whole field. So that BABIP of his? That’s no joke, and neither are his overall numbers. Werth started to put things together midway through 2012, and it’s safe to say now that he has things pretty well figured out.

    Power

    22/30

    Werth has seemed more interested in becoming an on-base machine than in recapturing the explosive power he had in his Phillies years, but some of that power has come back anyway. He’s not putting the ball in the air as often as he used to, but he’s working on his highest HR/FB in years and he hasn’t hit many cheapies to boot. As much as it seems like power’s not really his game anymore, it’s something he can still do.

    Baserunning

    8/15

    The days of Werth being good for 20 stolen bases per season are over, but he still has the speed to swipe the occasional base and has gotten to be very good at picking his spots. The same can be said of when he decides to go for an extra base, as he’s taken his share without making many outs in 2013.

    Defense

    7/15

    Werth is still a pretty good athlete, but he was never the most graceful outfielder and he’s not becoming any more graceful with age. He doesn’t cover any more ground than the average right fielder, and the last couple years have seen his arm become less of a weapon. He now passes for a merely average defensive player.

    Health

    7/10

    Werth was a durable player for a while there, but in the last couple years he’s spent time on the DL with a broken arm and a hamstring strain, and he’s recently come down with an infection in his right foot. At 34 years old, he’s probably not done adding injuries to his track record.

    Total

    73/100

    A lot hasn’t gone right for the Nationals in 2013, but they’re finally getting the Werth that they paid for a few years ago. He’s come to be an extremely tough out, and his power stroke looks a lot like it used to.

69. Jose Bautista, RF, Toronto Blue Jays

41 of 109

    Hitting

    21/30

    Bautista is still a lock to see at least four pitches every time he’s at the plate, and he still has some of the best plate discipline of any hitter in the majors. Combine the two, and you have a guy who’s going to get on base via the walk a fair amount. The catch is that Bautista’s contact habits are a bit all-or-nothing, as he’s either going to send the ball soaring through the air or skidding across the ground. He’s an extremely pull-heavy hitter to boot, and that predictability only makes it easier to defend him and, in turn, harder for his BABIP to go up.

    Power

    26/30

    Bautista was the best power hitter in the majors in 2010 and 2011, but that reputation began to fade last year and has continued to fade in 2013. His swing is still geared to get the ball in the air, yet he hasn’t been getting the ball in the air as often in 2013 as he did between 2010 and 2012. He’s also not getting it to go over the fence as regularly, notably hitting quite a few balls that have died on the warning track. His power is still really good, mind you, but not as explosive as it used to be.

    Baserunning

    9/15

    Baserunning is one of the more underrated aspects of Bautista’s game. He can swipe an occasional base, and he has no reservations whatsoever about going for the extra base on balls in play. He still has a frustrating tendency to run into outs, but he takes enough extra bases to make up for it.

    Defense

    10/15

    Bautista’s range in right field is nothing special. He reacts off the bat well enough and tends to take good routes, but he just doesn’t have the foot speed to cover a ton of ground. What he does have, however, is a cannon for an arm that he makes good use of. Running on Bautista is not advised.

    Health

    7/10

    The last two seasons have been rough on Bautista's health. He suffered a partially torn tendon sheath in 2012 that he eventually needed to have surgery on, and his dwindling power production makes one wonder if he’s fully recovered from it. Then he went and suffered a bone bruise in his left femur that got him shut down for the rest of the season. Worth mentioning: he turns 33 in October.

    Total

    73/100

    Bautista’s power may be down, but he still hits for more power than most. He’s also good at getting on base and can hold his own running the bases and playing defense as well. All told, he’s still a very well-rounded talent.

68. Austin Jackson, CF, Detroit Tigers

42 of 109

    Anthony Gruppuso-USA TODAY Sport

    Hitting

    15/20

    Pitchers have been a bit more aggressive in the zone against Jackson in 2013, forcing him to back off the uber-patient approach that he was using in 2012 and go back to being more of a hacker. But he's been able to salvage some of his improved discipline, and has thus been able to salvage a few walks. And although his BABIP is uncharacteristically low, he’s been a line-drive machine who has been bitten by some bad luck. He deserves better than the numbers he has.

    Power

    15/25

    Jackson broke out a power bat in 2012 to hit 16 home runs in 137 games, but he hasn’t quite had the same punch this year. He hasn’t hit the ball in the air that often, for one, and he’s been punching a few too many balls to deep center and deep right-center. All the same, he does have some solid power for his position, as that line drive habit of his comes in handy in terms of racking up both doubles and triples.

    Baserunning

    15/20

    Jackson has really cut down on the stolen bases over the past two years. Part of that is his power increasing, and another part of it is the fact that he’s had some issues with his wheels. But Jackson is still a very productive baserunner, and he gets a lot of chances to let it loose with guys like Torii Hunter, Miguel Cabrera and Prince Fielder behind him in the lineup. Despite that, he’s getting better about not running into outs on the bases rather than more prolific.

    Defense

    19/25

    Jackson was arguably the best defensive center fielder in the league in 2010 and 2011, but the advanced metrics saw regression in 2012, and they haven’t changed their mind this year. The numbers pass the eye test, as he does seem to have lost some a step in the field. The complaints only go so far, though. Jackson still covers a ton of ground, and he’s one of the smoothest in the league out in center field with a pretty good arm to boot.

    Health

    9/10

    Jackson’s body doesn’t have too many miles on it so early in his major league career, but it’s looking like he might be a one-DL-stint-per-year kind of guy. He spent three weeks on the DL with an ab strain last year and a month on the DL with a hamstring strain this year.

    Total

    73/100

    Jackson was one of the best players in baseball who got no attention whatsoever in 2012. He hasn’t been that guy in 2013, but he still gets on base, hits for some power, runs the bases and plays defense with the big boys.

67. Yasiel Puig, RF, Los Angeles Dodgers

43 of 109

    Hitting

    20/30

    “Surely this isn’t sustainable.” That’s been the line on Puig’s hitting ever since he first arrived, and it’s still the right conclusion to draw. He’s too aggressive for his own good. Any pitcher who can spin him a solid breaking ball on either corner stands a chance of getting him to whiff, and his contact habits shouldn’t be supporting a BABIP as high as his. But let’s give Puig this much credit: His plate coverage is astounding, and his brute strength helps him make plenty of hard contact. He won’t be a brilliant hitter in the long run, but he should be an easily above-average hitter.

    Power

    25/30

    Puig’s power production really hasn’t been as enormous as his .500-plus slugging percentage suggests it has been, but there’s no denying that he has a ton of raw power, and he definitely deserves credit for proving that he has the goods to make it show up in games. Puig has home run power from foul pole to foul pole, and he’s going to be a legit source of doubles and triples once he establishes a more consistent line-drive approach.

    Baserunning

    5/15

    Puig is definitely fast enough to be an impact baserunner, but for now he’s a total runaway locomotive on the basepaths. He needs to pick his spots better when it comes to stolen bases, and he also needs to know when to hold up when running on balls in play. He’s taken plenty of extra bases, but he's also racked up a ton of TOOTBLANs since he came to the majors. There’s a learning curve for him to tackle.

    Defense

    13/15

    I’ll be surprised if Puig doesn’t win a Gold Glove at some point in his career. He’s not the most instinctive outfielder, but he has the athleticism to cover a ton of ground and he certainly doesn’t mind sacrificing his body to make plays. And yes, his arm is powerful enough as is. Just wait until he learns to harness that power.

    Health

    10/10

    Unless he gets the message that he would be wise to tone things down, Puig is the kind of guy who’s going to be banged up all the time. But he’s been able to play through the various aches and pains he’s accumulated in 2013, and let’s not forget that he’s only going to be 23 years old in the winter. Puig’s body should be able to put up with some punishment for a while longer before he starts to break down.

    Total

    73/100

    Puig has obviously been a lot more dynamic in his rookie season than this score indicates, but this score also indicates another thing we know about him: He’s still raw. The 2014 season should be a good one for him, but it's unlikely it will go as swimmingly as this season has gone.

66. Freddie Freeman, 1B, Atlanta Braves

44 of 109

    Hitting

    27/30

    Freeman’s 6’5” frame gives him a big strike zone to watch over, so he deserves credit for cutting down on his strikeouts while also shoring up his walk habit as his big league career has evolved. It helps that he has a short, quick stroke that allows him to smoke line drives all over the field. He has a huge BABIP in 2013, and it should be considered a gift of Freeman’s hard-hitting ways.

    Power

    22/35

    Freeman’s power production does leave something to be desired in light of the size of his body and the position he plays. However, he’s going to be a solid source of doubles as long as he continues to crank out line drives on a regular basis, and he has enough pop in his bat to hit the ball out of the yard in any direction.

    Baserunning

    5/10

    Freeman was an occasional base stealer in 2011 and 2012, but he hasn’t bothered keeping up the habit in 2013. He’s also not one to surprise you on the basepaths, as he more or less fits the mold of a typical station-to-station big guy.

    Defense

    10/15

    Freeman’s a big target for Braves infielders to aim for, and he does a fine job of scooping throws out of the dirt. And while he’s not the quickest first baseman in the league, he’s gotten better at ranging out of his zone to make plays. He’s not among the elites defensively, but the signs of progress are there.

    Health

    9/10

    There’s a case to be made for a perfect score here, but Freeman was seemingly never 100 percent in 2012 and has run into more injury problems this year. He spent some time on the DL with an oblique strain earlier in the season and then had to sit out the All-Star Game with a bad thumb.

    Overall

    73/100

    Freeman was good in 2011 and 2012. Not great, but good. It was clear all along that he had the potential to be great, and that potential is being realized this year.

65. Derek Holland, SP, Texas Rangers

45 of 109

    Stuff

    22/30

    Holland throws both a fastball and a sinker that sit 94-95 and can occasionally go higher than that. Both pitches have good action, with the sinker in particular boasting plenty of horizontal movement. Holland has an average changeup that he breaks out against right-handed batters, but his signature pitch is a slider that is criminally overlooked as one of the game’s top offerings. 

    Command

    12/20

    Walks were an issue for Holland when he was getting his feet wet in 2010, but not so much anymore. His walk habit hasn’t budged too much since last year, and that’s a good thing seeing as how his walk rate in 2012 was 7.1 percent. He’s been pounding the zone with his sinker as consistently this year, and he’s gotten to be pretty good at pounding right-handed batters up and in with his hard stuff.

    Hittability 

    11/15

    Holland’s slider is his go-to whiff pitch, and it’s a dandy for that. Close to half of the swings taken at his slider have resulted in whiffs, and that’s feeding into what is turning out to be a strong strikeout year for Holland. He’s also keeping the ball in the yard well.

    Workhorse

    20/25

    Holland nearly hit 200 innings in 2011, a year in which he threw four shutouts. After a down year due to bad health in 2012, he should be able to hit 200 innings this year. He’s been averaging close to seven innings per start while throwing over 100 pitches per start, which is where the big boys reside.

    Health

    9/10

    There’s one medical red flag where Holland is concerned, and it’s planted squarely in his left shoulder. He was sidelined for over two months with shoulder inflammation in 2010 and was on