Tim Tebow: It's Not John Fox and John Elway Setting Him Up for Failure

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Tim Tebow: It's Not John Fox and John Elway Setting Him Up for Failure
Doug Pensinger/Getty Images

The Tim Tebow circus continues in Week 9.

First, it was criticism against head coach John Fox for not playing Tebow over Kyle Orton early in the year.

The critics and maniacal fans continued their pressure on Fox after every game with Orton at the helm—even after winning at home against the Cincinnati Bengals.

The Bengals are now making their bid for the AFC North title and actually competing with the Ravens and Steelers.

The criticism was pointed at Orton and Fox when they lost by three points to the Oakland Raiders, and four points to the Tennessee Titans—two teams that are playing at a high level in 2011 in two games that were lost by minimal margins.

Meanwhile, as the losses piled up, every fan with a loud voice cheered and chanted for Tebow.

"He's a winner," they'd say.

"He has the intangibles, he has what Orton never will."

Now that two of Tebow's 2011 starts are in the books, we have a good idea of what Tebow has.

And the answer is not a lot.

Not yet.

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In the NFL, it takes time to make something out of a young QB. Time that the Denver faithful was unwilling to spend.

This week, the cries for Tebow's success have taken a new low.

The fans now say that the front office for Denver is holding him back by not playing to his strengths, as if Tebow could never harm himself by, say, playing terribly for seven-and-a-half quarters.

Denver has used the shotgun formation 30 percent more in the last two weeks than in the first five.

They've also used a spread formation regularly throughout games with Tebow—a formation that rarely works consistently in the NFL.

How about using Tebow as the primary ball-carrier?

His strengths are playing from a spread offense, and running the ball.

Consider his strengths played to.

Others suggest that Fox and offensive coordinator Mike McCoy should call plays with high-percentage passes to get Tebow rolling.

Listen, the last thing the coaching staff is focusing on is making a quarterback that is currently playing very poorly look good to his fans.

Tebow needs to fit the game plan, just as the game plan needs to fit him—and the rest of the team.

Doug Pensinger/Getty Images

You can certainly build an offense around a player.

However, midseason, there is no way to completely change an offense that consists of 15-16 rotating players to fit entirely around the shortcomings of one.

No matter how much of an effect the quarterback has on the game, there's 10 other players on the field with him at one time and they all have to fit together.

What does Tebow have that Orton didn't have? So far, nothing aside from a crazy fan base. 

So here it is Denver fans.

What do you want more?

Do you want Denver to build their team appropriately—the job that they're being paid to do?

Or do you want Tebow to look good as the team loses?

The constant unrelenting pressure from the fans continues to impede the progress of the Broncos organization.

Maybe it's time we all sit back, watch some football and let the pros do their job.

If you disagree, feel free to let me know. I'll be the guy shaking my head and smiling when Tebow takes the bench again.

Good luck to you later in life Tebow, you're one hell of a kid. And may the crazies that follow you now get lost on the way to your next team.

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